Plate Boundaries Jocelyn Hewlett

DIVERGENT PLATE BOUNDARIES

OCEANIC TO OCEANIC

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Ocean to ocean Divergent Boundaries separate or move away from each other (<-- -->) this happens because of a stress called tension. The types of landforms ocean to ocean boundaries can form is the Mid-Ocean Ridge and volcanos. The Mid-Ocean Ridge is an underwater mountain formed by tectonic plates.

CONTINENTAL TO CONTINENTAL

Continental to continental divergent plate boundaries move away from each other (<-- -->) they do this because of tension. The type of landforms these boundaries can create are continental rift and volcanos. The pictures used as examples is the East African Rift and Iceland. The picture of Iceland you can see was separated by tension.

CONVERGENT PLATE BOUNDARIES

CONTINENTAL TO CONTINENTAL

Continental to continental plate boundaries move towards each other (--> <--) the type of stress that causes this is called compression. The type of landform that can be created by compression are mountains. As an example of the mountain(s) that were formed by this type of stress, the Himalayas were pushed so much to the point it created a giant mountain such as other mountains also.

OCEANIC TO CONTINENTAL

Oceanic to continental Convergent plate boundaries move towards each other (--> <--) the type of stress that causes this is called compression. The type of landforms that can be created by oceanic to continental plate boundaries can be trenches and volcanos. As an example to this, the pictures above show Mount Rainier that was created by compression and these boundaries. The oceanic and continental plates were pushed towards each other to create the landforms I used as examples.

TRANSFORM PLATE BOUNDARY

Transform plate boundaries move past each other. The type of stress that causes this is called shear. The type of landform(s) shear can create, are faults. Faults are commonly found all over the world that create earthquakes and tsunamis. An example of faults that break over time, the San Andreas Fault is the most popular that almost everyone knows about.
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Jocelyn Hewlett
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