59 shots Cinematography By: Katie Choi

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The boy is holding an object.
He drops the object.
The object hits a person.
The person is mad.
The boy is making fun of the person.

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The person walks to the door.

Mid-range shot (4 seconds)

A close-up of hand grabbing the door knob and opens the door.

(3 1/2 seconds)

The man walks through the door.

(4 seconds)

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A long shot provides the audience with information about the location, conditions, mood and setting.

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Wider than a mid-range shots. Shows action. Also, more surrounding back and forth is displayed on the screen.

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Mid-range shots are used to communicate actions and interactions of characters.

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A two-shot is an image that includes two characters.

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A medium close-up shot communicates gesture, broad expressions and action framed within close limits.

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Over-the-shoulder shots, are used to draw your audience into the action, as if the audience was in the shot with the character.

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Be careful...close-up shots limit the space in which your character can move.
Close-up shots communicates expression and reaction very well. Close-up shots focus attention on the expression and limit the background distractions.
Extreme close-up shots can be dramatic and communicate strong emotional impact!

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Extreme close-ups focus attention

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The used of side FX and/or dialogue to represent action not visible to the audience.

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Ariel shots can be very dramatic. A high camera perspective can communicate an interesting view of a location or action if used in the correct situation.

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A Tilted Camera Frane is used if you want to disorient your audience, create anxiety and tension.

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Capturing action in the shawdows can effectively create an apprehensive, fearful mood.

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Be creative. Use varied frame sizes and perspectives to involve and engage your audience.

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A low angle looking up creates a feeling that a character is dominant and superior.

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A camera looking down on a character communicates to an audience that a character might be weak and vulnerable.

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Relative size relationships, proportions and perspectives can be used to create strong emotional responses in your audience.

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Don't limit motion in your frame to just lateral (side to side) motion.

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Have characters and action move away from the audience.....
and toward the viewers

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Don't always position your character side-by-side.

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Position your character on a angle, with one a little closer to the camera than the other.

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Use shape, contrasting forms and color to focus attention.

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Positioning and staging the character and the props to frame the center of interest.

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Don't "camaflogue" your characters.
Use contrasting shapes, colors and forms to make your characters stand out.

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Dont't hide your character in the background.
Use lighting to highlight and frame your center of interest.

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It helps the audience if you design your character so that it stand out

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A pan shot is created when the camera is physically rotated on a tripod as it scans a background.

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Tracking is accomplished when you physically move the camera on a tracking system.

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Trucking the camera in or out of a shot is accomplished when you physically move the camera tracking system in or out on the set.

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A Zoom-Out is the creation of an apparent movement away from the subject by manipulation of the zoom ring on the camera lens.

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A zoom-in is the apparent movement toward a subject by the manipulation of the zoom ring on the camera lens

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Actual movement is when a character move across a stationary background

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Apparent movement is when a background is moved behind the subject.

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An anticpatory shot is a shot that is planned to set up and ready the audience for the next shot.

Anticipatory shot
Action shot

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An anticipatory action can occur within the same shot and lead up to the main action. In the shot to the left, a character exaggeratedly winds up before punching his victim. The wind-up lets the audience anticipate the punch!

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An emotional and / or physical reaction should follow every action.

Action
Reaction

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Physical force like gravity, drag, momentum, etc

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Th way you animate a object, machine, animal or character will depend on it's design and structure.

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How your character moves is also determined by how he / she feels ; his / her personality what motivate his / her action

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Timing within the shot should reflect the amount of time needed to convey the emotional pacing of the action within the shot.

( 3 second shot) fast timing

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Timing within the shot should reflect the amount of time needed to convey the emotional pacing of the action within the shot.

( 5 second shot ) slow timing

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