Cholesterol By: Connor Legge and Mason Bosley

Low-density lipoprotein is made up of 50% cholesterol and 25% proteins. Its function is to carry cholesterol and other fats to the cells that need it. It takes the cholesterol from the liver and moves it to different areas of the body to fulfill it's function. If LDL is not controlled it can get caught in the walls of the arteries. The build up of LDL in the arteries is called atherosclerosis.
High-density lipoprotein is a substance made up of 20% cholesterol and 50% protein. Its function is to carry cholesterol from the cells and tissue back to the liver. Removes excess cholesterol.
HDL, LDL and triglyceride level must all be monitored. If any of these were not there could be some serious health related problems. If HDL is not monitored it can drop, which would leave no one to clean up the LDL. This could lead to build up of LDL on the walls of veins and arteries, and eventually a stroke or heart attack. If LDL is not monitored it can get to high and cause a build up of excess cholesterol on the walls of arteries and veins. This can lead to a stroke or heart attack because of lack of blood flow. Triglycerides also if unmonitored can lead to a heart attack or stroke because of excess cholesterol on the walls of veins and arteries.
A person can lower their cholesterol levels by eating a low cholesterol diet, exercising regularly, eating unsaturated fats, and taking medications to help balance cholesterol levels. People can increase their cholesterol levels by eating fish which increases HDL levels, eating saturated fats, and eating a diet with more cholesterol.

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