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Kaitlynn Feller Photo portfolio

Rule of Thirds

In each of these photographs, I have used the rule of thirds to focus and blur and enhance the focal point. The water droplets on the leaves pull the viewer’s eye in and let them know that that is the focal point. The round dark spot on the tree keeps the viewers eye occupied. I blurred the the background of both pictures to make sure that the viewer’s eye doesn’t get confused. The different shades help contrast the picture and makes it more vibrant.

Macro

In these photos I used super macro to show the full extent of the plants. I put the focus on the first leaf and the two berries behind it and the bee. The berries and leaves in the background are blurred to put more focus. For the bee picture, I blurred the background and wanted to have the flower and bee focused on to please the viewer's eye. The photo is macro because the focal point of both pictures is much larger than it would be in real life.

Leading Lines

The picture below utilizes leading lines. Your eyes immediately go to the trunk of the tree and go all the way to the top (left photo). The barbed wire lead your eyes into the trees and to the pole (right photo). There is a good contrast between the greens and browns in both photos.

Monochrome

In these monochrome photos, I used the burn tool to darken preferred areas. I tinted the color of black that I used. I made the photo on the right have more of a purple tone, while the one on the left has more of a green tone.

Portrait

In my portrait photos the focal point for all of them is the face of the model. I photographed the models in a way that made them look off-guard. In the top right picture, I lowered the saturation. In the top left photo, I lightened the models hair. In the bottom left corner, I edited out the models bra strap.

Homework

I took these photos on a nature walk on Thanksgiving. The one on the far left is very simple to explain, it is a photo of the best person in the universe, that's all. The middle photo is of a plant that is focused on, while the background is blurred. I did the same thing with the photo on the right.

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