Patterns of Animal Skins Caden, Gage, Caleb

Tigers Stripes

You might be wondering how in the world do Tigers have evenly spaced out and parallel lines. Well scientists don't even know why they were designed in that exact way. Not every tiger has the same patterns in they're stripes. There are no same patterns!

Smaller Species

There are also patterns to animal spots, not just stripes. The forest can be a whole bunch of color and patterns, from the rosette spots on leopards and stripes, the biggest tiger to the smallest butterflies and polka-dotted flies. Exactly how these animals got their funky coats has been a mystery. According to recent studies, fruit flies are decorated with 16 spots on their wings, a finding that could apply to larger animals as well. The spot-stripe maker is called Morphogen, which is a protein that tells certain cells to make pigment. It is crazy that a fruit fly could have exactly 16 spots, no more, no less.

Survival of the Sea Creatures

Tasseled Anglerfish

The Tasseled Anglerfish is one of over 200 Anglerfish species that put food on the table by combining camouflage and the fishing tackle that gives them their name. The fish uses a protruding piece of rodlike dorsal spine, tipped with a bacteria fueled, glowing “lure,” to tempt prey close enough to be gulped by its outsize mouth.

Coleman Shrimp

The vivid Coleman shrimp has developed the perfect camouflage for its perch amid the venomous spines of a fire urchin in Komodo National Park, Indonesia. The blue tips of the urchin’s spines are filled with toxic venom, but the shrimp is able to live comfortably among them without injury.

Octopuses and Squids that Change Color

Octopuses and squids are some of the only animals in the world that can change color in the blink of an eye. They are called cephalopod's they use this as an instinct to hide from predators. They can also use this as a way to hide from prey and attack when the prey cant see them.

Sources

http://www.livescience.com/6305-study-reveals-creatures-spots-stripes.html

http://ocean.si.edu/ocean-news/how-octopuses-and-squids-change-color

Credits:

Created with images by eileendeliot - "zebra zoo coat" • jdnx - "Tiger" • Marcus Meissner - "Tiger" • Marcus Meissner - "Tiger" • cheetah100 - "Tiger" • Pexels - "animal big cat safari" • Marcus Meissner - "Tiger" • Joachim_Marian_Winkler - "tiger siberian tiger cat" • skeeze - "tiger yawning snow" • PLR_Photos - "Tiger" • MarioQA - "Tephritid fruit fly (Ceratitis)" • Christian Gloor (mostly) underwater photographer - "Coleman's Shrimp"

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