Loading

Crime, Justice, & Equity 2019 Technology, Media, & Privacy Law (TMPL) Conference University of Florida Levin College of Law

Day 1 • April 4, 2019

Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial Classroom (Holland Hall Room 180)

12:00 pm – 12:45 pm • Lunch Buffet

12:45 pm – 1:00 pm • Welcome and Opening Remarks

John L. Mills

Jon L. Mills is Professor of Law, Dean Emeritus, and Director of Center for Governmental Responsibility at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. He is Counsel to Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP. Professor Mills is a globally recognized expert in privacy and cyber security issues. He appeared in landmark litigation including high profile privacy intrusion cases representing the families of Dale Earnhardt, Jr., Gianni Versace, and Sea World trainer Dawn Brancheau. He was also counsel in cases to prevent disclosure of information from electronic intrusions and hacking. He has lectured on privacy to judges, attorneys and corporate counsel. He served as Dean of the University of Florida Levin College of Law from 1999–2003 and Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives from 1987–1988, served as member of the 1997–1998 Florida Constitution Revision Commission (as Chair of Style and Drafting Committee and was selected Most Valuable Member). He has written books, reports and multiple law review articles on public policy issues including two books on privacy: Privacy: The Lost Right (Oxford University Press 2008) and Privacy in the New Media Age (University Press of Florida 2015). He received his J.D. from the University of Florida (with honors) and his B.A. from Stetson University.

Diane McFarlin

Diane McFarlin is the dean of the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications. She began her journalism career in high school and took a reporting job in Sarasota after earning her B.S. in Journalism from the University of Florida. Dean McFarlin rose through the ranks to become managing editor of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune at age thirty. She was named executive editor of The Gainesville Sun three years later and then returned to the Herald-Tribune, serving as executive editor for a decade and publisher for thirteen years. She became the dean of the College in January 2013. Since arriving here, she has developed a strategic framework for the College, expanded interdisciplinary initiatives, established a central hub for professional advising and student services, increased research productivity through top faculty hires and increased funding, and launched The Agency, a strategic communication agency led by professionals and run by students. In March 2019, she was named the Scripps Howard Awards College Administrator of the Year. Dean McFarlin is a past president of the American Society of News Editors and has served six times as a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes. She has taught at the Centers for Independent Journalism in Prague and Bucharest and addressed the World Editor’s Forum on the subject of multimedia newsrooms. McFarlin has worked on behalf of numerous nonprofit organizations and launched the Season of Sharing charitable fund, which has raised $20 million to provide crisis funding to families on the brink of homelessness.

Laura A. Rosenbury

Laura A. Rosenbury is the Dean and Levin, Mabie & Levin Professor of Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. Under Dean Rosenbury’s leadership, UF Law has increased incoming applications, enrolled some of the most accomplished and diverse classes in UF Law’s history, and successfully completed two of the largest fundraising years in the past decade. As a result, UF Law rose seventeen spots in U.S. News and World Report – Best Law Schools rankings since 2016. Dean Rosenbury also has worked with faculty and alumni to forge international partnerships and extend UF Law’s reach around the globe. Before joining the UF Law community, Dean Rosenbury was a professor of law and vice dean at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis. She also has served as a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, Stanford Law School and University of Chicago Law School. Dean Rosenbury’s research and teaching focus on the law of private relationships, exploring how law and social norms interact in family law, employment discrimination law, and property law. Her work has been published in the Yale Law Journal, Michigan Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Cornell Law Review, and in many other journals and books. Dean Rosenbury was elected to the American Law Institute in 2010 and was named a fellow of the American Bar Foundation in 2014. Dean Rosenbury previously worked as a litigation associate at Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York City, primarily defending corporations in white-collar criminal cases. She also clerked for Judge Carol Bagley Amon of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York and Judge Dennis Jacobs of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Dean Rosenbury received her A.B. summa cum laude in women’s studies from Harvard-Radcliffe College and her J.D. cum laude from Harvard Law School, where she served as a primary editor of the Harvard Law Review.

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm • Session 1: Digitally Monitoring Racial Equality in the Justice System

A discussion about how data and information technology should be used to drive equality and accountability within the justice system.

PANELISTS • Day 1 - Session 1

Michael Braga

Michael Braga is the regional investigations editor for GateHouse Media, which owns more than 150 newspapers across the United States. Braga has been working as an investigative reporter and editor for the past decade and co-authored a series of stories about Florida mental hospitals (Insane. Invisible. In Danger) that won the Pulitzer Prize in 2016. Born in New York, he holds a B.A. in History from Duke University and an M.A. in Economics from the University of Texas. Braga spent three years working as a reporter in Venezuela and Argentina and more than a decade for business publications business in Florida.

Jennie Brooks

Jennie Brooks is the Assistance Director of Data Outreach at Measures for Justice, a non-profit organization that develops data-driven performance measures to assess and compare the criminal justice process from arrest to post-conviction on a county-by-county basis. Brooks joined Measures for Justice in 2016 and is responsible for assisting in the development and implementation of its national outreach and data collection strategies. She also leads the organization’s work to collect data from twenty states by 2020. She completed her undergraduate education at the Western Michigan University and received her master’s degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Eastern Michigan University.

Kenneth B. Nunn

Kenneth B. Nunn is the Associate Director of the Center on Children and Families at the University of Florida Levin College of Law and the Assistant Director of the Criminal Justice Center. Professor Nunn joined the University of Florida Levin College of Law faculty in 1990 and has twice been named “teacher of the year.” His expertise includes in the fields of Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Race Relations and the Law, Police Brutality, Race and the Criminal Process, Cultural Studies, and African and Africa-centered thought. He co-founded the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations, one of a few law school centers that focus on race. Professor Nunn is also an Affiliate Professor in the UF Center for African Studies and in the UF African American Studies Program. He previously worked as a public defender in San Francisco and Washington, D.C. and as a staff attorney at the Southern Africa Project. Professor Nunn has published a variety of written works, including several book chapters and various articles on topics such as race, diversity, critical theories, and human injustice. He received his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Laurent A. Sacharoff

Laurent A. Sacharoff is a Professor of Law at the University of Arkansas School of Law, where he teaches criminal law, criminal procedure, evidence, and cybercrime. Professor Sacharoff was named outstanding law professor of the year for 2015, and in 2016, he was named the university-wide rising teacher of the year. His research interests include criminal law and procedure as well as computer law and encryption. Professor Sacharoff’s works have been published in major journals such as Texas Law Review, Alabama Law Review, and Washington University Law Review, and have been cited by the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit Court and in legal treatises. He previously served as a law clerk for the Honorable John S. Martin, Jr. in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and joined the law firm of Sullivan & Cromwell, where he was the pro-bono fellow handling prison litigation. He received his B.A. from Princeton University and his J.D. from Columbia Law School, where he was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar.

MODERATOR • Day 1 - Session 1

Darren Hutchinson

Darren Hutchinson is the Associate Dean for Faculty Development, holds the prestigious Raymond & Miriam Ehrlich Eminent Scholar Chair, and is a Professor of Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. Professor Hutchinson has written extensively on issues related to Constitutional Law, Critical Race Theory, Law and Sexuality, and Social Identity Theory. His numerous publications have appeared in many prestigious journals including Cornell Law Review, Washington University Law Review, UCLA Law Review, and Alabama Law Review. At the University of Florida Levin College of Law, Professor Hutchinson teaches Constitutional Law, Remedies, Race and the Law, and Civil Rights Seminar. Prior to his career in teaching law, Professor Hutchinson practiced commercial litigation at Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in New York City. He also clerked for the late Honorable Mary Johnson Lowe, a former United States District Judge in the Southern District of New York. He received a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

2:15 pm – 3:15 pm • Session 2: Body Cameras, Mugshots, and Criminal Records

Balancing Privacy and Transparency This session will address the public interests and privacy concerns implicated by publicly accessible body camera footage, arrestee mugshots, and individual criminal records.

PANELISTS • Day 1 - Session 2

Latonia P. Hines

Latonia P. Hines is a double alumna of the University of Florida. She graduated from UF with Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and minors in English and Geography in 1996. She went on to attend the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law and graduate with a Juris Doctorate degree in 1999. She has been a prosecutor for over ten years in the Cobb County Solicitor’s Office, which handles all misdemeanor and ordinance violation cases which occur in Cobb County. Latonia holds the title of Senior Assistant Solicitor General and Training Coordinator. She is the Prosecutorial Liaison for SunTrust Park and Battery Atlanta and handles the public safety and policy issues arising out of the new Braves Stadium complex. She handles cases such as Domestic Violence, Human Trafficking, theft and DUIs. She helps train police officers and new prosecutors. Outside of her work at the Solicitor’s office, she has also been adjunct professor at Kennesaw State University. Latonia is deeply involved with journalism and media. She is the former Editor-in-Chief of the Cobb Bar Magazine, Justicia. Latonia is a regular legal analyst and expert for local and national television networks, such as CBS, CNN, and HLN, and including such shows as The Nancy Grace Show. She also appears regularly on Atlanta’s NBC affiliate, 11Alive, as a legal analyst. Since 2016, Latonia has been an active member of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS). In 2017, she received an Emmy award as a member of the 11Alive’s Legal Dream Team coverage of the Ross Harris murder trial. She is a regular public speaker and often gives presentations on the intersection of law and media.

Chacyln Hunt

Chaclyn Hunt is a civil rights attorney with the Invisible Institute, where she co-directs the Youth/Police Project & the Citizens Police Data Project. The Invisible Institute is a journalism production company on the South Side of Chicago focused on human rights documentation, investigative reporting, civil rights litigation, the curating of public information, conceptual art projects, and the orchestration of difficult public conversations. Its mission is to enhance the capacity of citizens to hold public institutions accountable. The Invisible Institute’s Citizens Police Data Project is a tool for holding police accountable to the public they serve by taking records of police interactions with the public that would be generally inaccessible and establishes a permanent record for every police officer. The Invisible Institute’s Youth / Police Project builds conversations with black teens about how their lives are affected by the character of the police presence in their neighborhoods. Hunt has coordinated a Youth/Police Conference at the University of Chicago Law School and co-authored an article titled, “They Have all the Power”: Youth/Police Encounters on Chicago’s South Side, 2016 U. CHI. LEGAL F. 125. She received her B.A. from the University of California, Santa Cruz and her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School.

Thomas R. Julin

Thomas R. Julin is a shareholder in the Miami office of Gunster. He is dedicated to advocating the First Amendment rights of businesses. Most notably, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled favorably in Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc., 564 U.S. 552 (2011) on Julin’s argument that data mining for target marketing is protected against regulation that cannot survive heightened judicial scrutiny. That precedent-setting opinion, which resulted in the invalidation of three state laws, since has been cited in more than 1,000 judicial decisions in which companies have challenged laws and regulations restricting advertising, pharmaceutical sales, securities offerings, labor practices, internet communications, and more. Julin has extensive litigation experience, resulting in more than 250 reported judicial decisions. From the beginning of his practice to today, he has focused on advocating open government principles. Recently, he led a journalist’s campaign to declassify twenty-eight pages of a Congressional report regarding the Saudi government’s possible support for the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States. The report had been kept secret for more than thirteen years until declassified by President Obama in 2016. He earned his J.D. and B.A. from the University of Florida.

Aaron Mackey

Aaron Mackey is a Staff Attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EEF). His work centers on free speech, privacy, government surveillance, and transparency. Before joining EFF in 2015, he worked on speech, privacy, and freedom of information issues in Washington, D.C. at the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and the Institute for Public Representation at Georgetown Law. Mackey graduated from Berkeley Law in 2012, where he worked for EFF while a student in the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic. He also holds an LL.M. from Georgetown Law. Prior to law school, Mackey was a journalist at the Arizona Daily Star in Tucson, Arizona. He received his undergraduate degree in journalism and English from the University of Arizona.

Gregg Thomas

Gregg Thomas is a partner in the Tampa office of Thomas & LoCicero. He is a leading media and First Amendment lawyer. Thomas has argued and won numerous high-profile cases on behalf of newspapers, television stations, movie producers, and other media entities. He has also handled multi-million-dollar commercial disputes and trademark infringement cases. Thomas has argued and won cases before the Florida and United States Supreme Courts, including Butterworth v. Smith, 494 U.S. 624 (1990), where he convinced the U.S. Supreme Court that laws prohibiting grand jury witnesses from disclosing their testimony violated the First Amendment. Prior to entering private practice, Thomas was a judicial clerk to the Honorable Ben Krentzman and the Honorable George Carr, both United States District Court Judges in the Middle District of Florida. He earned his J.D. from the University of Florida and holds a B.A. from Vanderbilt University.

Russell L. Weaver

Russell L. Weaver holds the rank of Professor of Law and Distinguished University Scholar at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law. Professor Weaver teaches the First Amendment, Constitutional Law, Advanced Constitutional Law, Remedies, Administrative Law, Criminal Law, and Criminal Procedure. He has received the Brandeis School of Law’s awards for teaching, scholarship, and service, and has been awarded the President’s Award (University of Louisville) for Outstanding Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity in the Field of Social Science, the President’s Award for Outstanding Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity in the Career Achievement Category, and the President’s Award for Distinguished Service. Professor Weaver is a prolific author who has written dozens of books and articles over the last twenty-five years. He is particularly noted for his work in the constitutional law area, especially his writings on free speech. In addition to authoring From Gutenberg to the Internet: Free Speech, Advancing Technology and the Implications for Democracy, and The Right to Speak Ill, he served as a consultant to the constitutional drafting commissions of Belarus and Kyrghyzstan and as a commentator on the Russian Constitution. Previously, Professor Weaver was associated with Watson, Ess, Marshall & Enggas in Kansas City, Missouri, and worked for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of General Counsel in Washington, D.C. He graduated cum laude from the University of Missouri School of Law and earned his B.A. from the University of Missouri.

MODERATOR • Day 1 - Session 2

Amy Gajda

Amy Gajda is the Class of 1937 Professor of Law at the Tulane University Law School. Professor Gajda’s scholarship focuses on media law, torts, information privacy, and higher education law. She brings her background as an award-winning television news anchor and reporter, whose work appeared in The New York Times, to her insight into the tensions between social regulation and protected expression. Her articles have appeared in California Law Review and other legal journals. Professor Gajda’s most recent book, The First Amendment Bubble: How Privacy and Paparazzi Threaten a Free Press (Harvard University Press 2015), explores judicial oversight of journalistic news judgment. She is a frequent commenter on media law, privacy and press rights in print and broadcast media around the world, including the CBS Morning News, The Guardian, The New Yorker and Australian Broadcasting Network. Professor Gajda practiced law in Washington, D.C., before starting her teaching career at the University of Illinois. She is admitted to practice in the District of Columbia, Virginia and her home state of Michigan. She has chaired the Association of American Law Schools’ Section on Defamation and Privacy and its Section on Mass Communication, and she led the Law and Policy Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. She received her B.A. from The University of Michigan and her J.D. from Wayne State University.

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm • Day 1 Closing Plenary

This session will provide an opportunity to recap the previous panel discussions, highlight key takeaways, seek further insights from other speakers in attendance, and to solicit audience questions.

PANELISTS • Day 1 - Closing Plenary

Amy Gajda

Amy Gajda is the Class of 1937 Professor of Law at the Tulane University Law School. Professor Gajda’s scholarship focuses on media law, torts, information privacy, and higher education law. She brings her background as an award-winning television news anchor and reporter, whose work appeared in The New York Times, to her insight into the tensions between social regulation and protected expression. Her articles have appeared in California Law Review and other legal journals. Professor Gajda’s most recent book, The First Amendment Bubble: How Privacy and Paparazzi Threaten a Free Press (Harvard University Press 2015), explores judicial oversight of journalistic news judgment. She is a frequent commenter on media law, privacy and press rights in print and broadcast media around the world, including the CBS Morning News, The Guardian, The New Yorker and Australian Broadcasting Network. Professor Gajda practiced law in Washington, D.C., before starting her teaching career at the University of Illinois. She is admitted to practice in the District of Columbia, Virginia and her home state of Michigan. She has chaired the Association of American Law Schools’ Section on Defamation and Privacy and its Section on Mass Communication, and she led the Law and Policy Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. She received her B.A. from The University of Michigan and her J.D. from Wayne State University.

Frank LoMonte

Frank LoMonte is the Director of the Brechner Center for Freedom of Information at the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications. Previously, he was the Executive Director of the Student Press Law Center (SPLC) in Washington, D.C. Before joining the SPLC, Professor LoMonte practiced law with Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP in Atlanta and clerked for the Honorable R. Lanier Anderson, III, of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and for the Honorable C. Christopher Hagy of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Prior to embarking on his legal career, Professor LoMonte was an award-winning investigative journalist and political columnist. He was the capitol correspondent for the Florida Times Union (Jacksonville), Washington correspondent for Morris News Service and the Atlanta bureau chief for Morris. He was the Otis Brumby Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at the Georgia Law School in spring-summer 2014 and has been a lecturer since 2015 in the University of Georgia Washington Program, teaching a course for undergraduates on “Law of Social Media.” He received his B.A. from Georgia State University and his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Georgia School of Law.

Day 2 • April 5, 2019

Main Courtroom, Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center

8:30 am – 9:00 am • Continental Breakfast

9:00 am – 9:15 am • Welcome and Opening Remarks

Jon L. Mills

Jon L. Mills is Professor of Law, Dean Emeritus, and Director of Center for Governmental Responsibility at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. He is Counsel to Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP. Professor Mills is a globally recognized expert in privacy and cyber security issues. He appeared in landmark litigation including high profile privacy intrusion cases representing the families of Dale Earnhardt, Jr., Gianni Versace, and Sea World trainer Dawn Brancheau. He was also counsel in cases to prevent disclosure of information from electronic intrusions and hacking. He has lectured on privacy to judges, attorneys and corporate counsel. He served as Dean of the University of Florida Levin College of Law from 1999–2003 and Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives from 1987–1988, served as member of the 1997–1998 Florida Constitution Revision Commission (as Chair of Style and Drafting Committee and was selected Most Valuable Member). He has written books, reports and multiple law review articles on public policy issues including two books on privacy: Privacy: The Lost Right (Oxford University Press 2008) and Privacy in the New Media Age (University Press of Florida 2015). He received his J.D. from the University of Florida (with honors) and his B.A. from Stetson University.

9:15 am – 10:30 am • Session 1: Predictive Crime Analytics Law Enforcement and National Security in the Age of Big Data

This session will feature a discussion of issues regarding individual rights and public safety that are raised and addressed by data analytics that predict the likelihood that individuals may become involved in criminal activity, especially in regards to the increasing privatization of this field.

PANELISTS • Day 2 - Session 1

Hannah Bloch-Wehba

Hannah Bloch-Wehba is an Assistant Professor of Law at the Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law. Professor Bloch-Wehba’s scholarship explores the intersection of civil liberties and cyber issues in the law, focusing on free expression, privacy, and government accountability. Her interests include transparency and accountability for law enforcement, public access to information, and the use of new technologies in government decision-making. Professor Bloch-Wehba most recently taught at Yale Law School, where she was a clinical lecturer-in-law, research scholar, and Stanton Foundation First Amendment Fellow. Her articles have appeared in journals including Washington Law Review, Suffolk University Law Review and Brooklyn Journal of International Law. Before entering academia, Professor Bloch-Wehba worked as a Stanton Foundation National Security Fellow for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in Washington, D.C., where she represented journalists and media organizations in federal matters involving access to information, privacy, and other First and Fourth Amendment issues involving national security, technology, and surveillance. Previously, she practiced at Baker Botts LLP in Houston, Texas. She received her J.D. from New York University School of Law, where she served as senior articles editor for the Journal of International Law and Politics. She received her B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin.

Mark D. Cole

Mark D. Cole is the Professor of Media and Telecommunication Law at the University of Luxembourg, where he is also a Faculty Member of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) and the Course Director for the Master in Space, Communication and Media Law (LL.M.) at the Research Unit in Law. In addition, he is the Director for Academic Affairs at the Institute of European Media Law (EMR). Professor Cole is member of the Advisory Committee of the Luxembourg Independent Media Authority (Autorité luxembourgeoise indépendante de l’audiovisuel, ALIA), one of the first appointed arbitrators at the German Media Arbitral Tribunal (Deutsches Medienschiedsgericht, DMS), Co-Director of the Institute of Legal Informatics (Institut für Rechtsinformatik) at the Universität des Saarlandes and holds a seat in the Advisory Council of the European Audiovisual Observatory of the Council of Europe. He specializes in European and Comparative Media Law, including traditional mass media, new information technologies, data protection, and intellectual property. Professor Cole is also a co-editor of the publications Rundfunkstaatsvertrag/Jugendmedienschutzstaatsvertrag – Heidelberger Kommentar and Europäisches und Internationales Medienrecht as well at the forthcoming The EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive – Comparative Commentary on the AVMSD and National Implementation. In addition, he is the co-founder and associate editor of European Data Protection Law Review (EdpL). He studied law and political science and holds a doctorate from the Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz (2003) as well as both German State Examinations in Law (1998/2004).

Berta Esperanza Hernández-Truyol

Berta Esperanza Hernández-Truyol is an internationally renowned human rights scholar who utilizes an interdisciplinary and international framework to promote human well-being around the globe. Professor Hernández-Truyol joined the University of Florida Levin College of Law and was named Levin, Mabie & Levin Professor of Law in 2000. In 2019, she was named the Stephen C. O’Connell Chair. Professor Hernández-Truyol is engaged in initiatives that seek to develop, expand and transform the human rights discourse with a focus on issues of gender, race, ethnicity, culture, sexuality, language, and other vulnerabilities as well as their interconnections. She travels broadly to discuss and teach human rights. She has made presentations and offered courses in countries around the world including Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, France, Italy, Mexico, Peru, Spain, and Uruguay. Her current research includes an examination of the ongoing migration crises. Among her many publications, Professor Hernández-Truyol co-authored Just Trade: A New Covenant Linking Trade and Human Rights (NYU Press 2009), which elucidated how embracing the interdependence of trade and human rights promotes human flourishing. She earned her LL.M. in International Legal Studies from New York University School of Law, her J.D. from Albany Law School of Union University, and her B.A. from Cornell University.

Ronald Krotoszynski

Ronald Krotoszynski is the John S. Stone Chairholder of Law, Director of Faculty Research, and Professor of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law. Professor Krotoszynski teaches Administrative Law, Constitutional Law, First Amendment, Telecommunications Law, Comparative Constitutional Law, Comparative Law, and Federal Civil Rights. He is also the author of several books, including Privacy Revisited: A Global Perspective on the Right to be Left Alone (Oxford University Press 2016) and Reclaiming the Petition Clause: Seditious Libel, “Offensive” Protest, and the Right to Petition the Government for a Redress of Grievances (Yale University Press 2012). Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Alabama School of Law, Professor Krotoszynski served on the law faculty at Washington and Lee University School of Law. He clerked for the Honorable Frank M. Johnson, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and was an associate with Covington & Burling, in Washington, D.C. Professor Krotoszynski earned his B.A. and M.A. from Emory University and his J.D. and LL.M. from Duke University, where he was articles editor for the Duke Law Journal and selected for Order of the Coif.

MODERATOR • Day 2 - Session 1

A. Michael Froomkin

A. Michael Froomkin is the Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law. Professor Froomkin is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of JOTWELL: The Journal of Things We Like (Lots), an online law journal that publishes reviews of the best new scholarship relating to the law. He is also the founder of the We Robot conference on legal and policy issues relating to robotics. He is an Affiliated Fellow of the Yale Information Society Project (Yale ISP), and on the Advisory Boards of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), and the Future of Privacy Forum. Professor Froomkin currently teaches Administrative Law, Torts, and short courses in Robot Law and Privacy. He clerked for the Honorable Stephen F. Williams of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and for the Honorable John F. Grady, chief judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Professor Froomkin joined the University of Miami faculty after working in the London office of the Washington, D.C., firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering. He received a M.Phil. degree from Cambridge University and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

10:45 am – 11:45 am • Day 2: Summary Plenary

This session will provide an opportunity to recap the previous panel discussions, highlight key takeaways, seek further insights from other speakers in attendance, and to solicit audience questions.

PANELISTS • Day 2 - Summary Plenary

A. Michael Froomkin

A. Michael Froomkin is the Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law. Professor Froomkin is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of JOTWELL: The Journal of Things We Like (Lots), an online law journal that publishes reviews of the best new scholarship relating to the law. He is also the founder of the We Robot conference on legal and policy issues relating to robotics. He is an Affiliated Fellow of the Yale Information Society Project (Yale ISP), and on the Advisory Boards of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), and the Future of Privacy Forum. Professor Froomkin currently teaches Administrative Law, Torts, and short courses in Robot Law and Privacy. He clerked for the Honorable Stephen F. Williams of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and for the Honorable John F. Grady, chief judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Professor Froomkin joined the University of Miami faculty after working in the London office of the Washington, D.C., firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering. He received a M.Phil. degree from Cambridge University and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

Latonia P. Hines

Latonia P. Hines is a double alumna of the University of Florida. She graduated from UF with Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and minors in English and Geography in 1996. She went on to attend the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law and graduate with a Juris Doctorate degree in 1999. She has been a prosecutor for over ten years in the Cobb County Solicitor’s Office, which handles all misdemeanor and ordinance violation cases which occur in Cobb County. Latonia holds the title of Senior Assistant Solicitor General and Training Coordinator. She is the Prosecutorial Liaison for SunTrust Park and Battery Atlanta and handles the public safety and policy issues arising out of the new Braves Stadium complex. She handles cases such as Domestic Violence, Human Trafficking, theft and DUIs. She helps train police officers and new prosecutors. Outside of her work at the Solicitor’s office, she has also been adjunct professor at Kennesaw State University. Latonia is deeply involved with journalism and media. She is the former Editor-in-Chief of the Cobb Bar Magazine, Justicia. Latonia is a regular legal analyst and expert for local and national television networks, such as CBS, CNN, and HLN, and including such shows as The Nancy Grace Show. She also appears regularly on Atlanta’s NBC affiliate, 11Alive, as a legal analyst. Since 2016, Latonia has been an active member of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS). In 2017, she received an Emmy award as a member of the 11Alive’s Legal Dream Team coverage of the Ross Harris murder trial. She is a regular public speaker and often gives presentations on the intersection of law and media.

Ronald Krotoszynski

Ronald Krotoszynski is the John S. Stone Chairholder of Law, Director of Faculty Research, and Professor of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law. Professor Krotoszynski teaches Administrative Law, Constitutional Law, First Amendment, Telecommunications Law, Comparative Constitutional Law, Comparative Law, and Federal Civil Rights. He is also the author of several books, including Privacy Revisited: A Global Perspective on the Right to be Left Alone (Oxford University Press 2016) and Reclaiming the Petition Clause: Seditious Libel, “Offensive” Protest, and the Right to Petition the Government for a Redress of Grievances (Yale University Press 2012). Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Alabama School of Law, Professor Krotoszynski served on the law faculty at Washington and Lee University School of Law. He clerked for the Honorable Frank M. Johnson, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and was an associate with Covington & Burling, in Washington, D.C. Professor Krotoszynski earned his B.A. and M.A. from Emory University and his J.D. and LL.M. from Duke University, where he was articles editor for the Duke Law Journal and selected for Order of the Coif.

MODERATOR • Day 2 - Summary Plenary

Jon L. Mills

Jon L. Mills is Professor of Law, Dean Emeritus, and Director of Center for Governmental Responsibility at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. He is Counsel to Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP. Professor Mills is a globally recognized expert in privacy and cyber security issues. He appeared in landmark litigation including high profile privacy intrusion cases representing the families of Dale Earnhardt, Jr., Gianni Versace, and Sea World trainer Dawn Brancheau. He was also counsel in cases to prevent disclosure of information from electronic intrusions and hacking. He has lectured on privacy to judges, attorneys and corporate counsel. He served as Dean of the University of Florida Levin College of Law from 1999–2003 and Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives from 1987–1988, served as member of the 1997–1998 Florida Constitution Revision Commission (as Chair of Style and Drafting Committee and was selected Most Valuable Member). He has written books, reports and multiple law review articles on public policy issues including two books on privacy: Privacy: The Lost Right (Oxford University Press 2008) and Privacy in the New Media Age (University Press of Florida 2015). He received his J.D. from the University of Florida (with honors) and his B.A. from Stetson University.

12:00 pm – 12:45 pm • Lunch & Discussion

An interactive question and answer session for audience members and panelists to engage in further dialogue about how technology is reshaping privacy and transparency issues related to criminal justice in the fields of law, journalism, and public policy.

MODERATOR • Day 2 - Lunch & Discussion

Frank LoMonte

Frank LoMonte is the Director of the Brechner Center for Freedom of Information at the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications. Previously, he was the Executive Director of the Student Press Law Center (SPLC) in Washington, D.C. Before joining the SPLC, Professor LoMonte practiced law with Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP in Atlanta and clerked for the Honorable R. Lanier Anderson, III, of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and for the Honorable C. Christopher Hagy of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Prior to embarking on his legal career, Professor LoMonte was an award-winning investigative journalist and political columnist. He was the capitol correspondent for the Florida Times Union (Jacksonville), Washington correspondent for Morris News Service and the Atlanta bureau chief for Morris. He was the Otis Brumby Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at the Georgia Law School in spring-summer 2014 and has been a lecturer since 2015 in the University of Georgia Washington Program, teaching a course for undergraduates on “Law of Social Media.” He received his B.A. from Georgia State University and his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Georgia School of Law.

12:45 pm – 1:00 pm • Closing Remarks

Frank LoMonte

Frank LoMonte is the Director of the Brechner Center for Freedom of Information at the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications. Previously, he was the Executive Director of the Student Press Law Center (SPLC) in Washington, D.C. Before joining the SPLC, Professor LoMonte practiced law with Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP in Atlanta and clerked for the Honorable R. Lanier Anderson, III, of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and for the Honorable C. Christopher Hagy of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Prior to embarking on his legal career, Professor LoMonte was an award-winning investigative journalist and political columnist. He was the capitol correspondent for the Florida Times Union (Jacksonville), Washington correspondent for Morris News Service and the Atlanta bureau chief for Morris. He was the Otis Brumby Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at the Georgia Law School in spring-summer 2014 and has been a lecturer since 2015 in the University of Georgia Washington Program, teaching a course for undergraduates on “Law of Social Media.” He received his B.A. from Georgia State University and his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Georgia School of Law.

Jon L. Mills

Jon L. Mills is Professor of Law, Dean Emeritus, and Director of Center for Governmental Responsibility at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. He is Counsel to Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP. Professor Mills is a globally recognized expert in privacy and cyber security issues. He appeared in landmark litigation including high profile privacy intrusion cases representing the families of Dale Earnhardt, Jr., Gianni Versace, and Sea World trainer Dawn Brancheau. He was also counsel in cases to prevent disclosure of information from electronic intrusions and hacking. He has lectured on privacy to judges, attorneys and corporate counsel. He served as Dean of the University of Florida Levin College of Law from 1999–2003 and Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives from 1987–1988, served as member of the 1997–1998 Florida Constitution Revision Commission (as Chair of Style and Drafting Committee and was selected Most Valuable Member). He has written books, reports and multiple law review articles on public policy issues including two books on privacy: Privacy: The Lost Right (Oxford University Press 2008) and Privacy in the New Media Age (University Press of Florida 2015). He received his J.D. from the University of Florida (with honors) and his B.A. from Stetson University.

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a copyright violation, please follow the DMCA section in the Terms of Use.