Kilted Bros Magazine January 2017

Happy New Year, Misfits and Hooligans!

Wow. 2016 was a shit-show, wasn't it? From celebrities dying to the political maelstrom, last year was certainly enough to test anyone's patience. Fortunately, if you're reading this, you made it through. It might have been rough, but you now have stories to tell.

2106 was a year of growth for us in many ways. We

Rules for Wear Tartans

"I want to wear a tartan, but I'm not Scottish. Is that allowed?"

"I want to wear a tartan, but it's not my family's clan. Is that OK?"

"I want to wear my boyfriend's family tartan, but we're not married. Is that permissible?"

For Fuck's Sake -- YES.

There are probably still some purists around who say that you can only wear a clan tartan if you have the clan's name as a surname. If you have some Scottish heritage and want to celebrate it by wearing the kilt then there's nothing to stop you. Look at the surnames of your grandparents and then your great grandparents on both sides of the family and see if any of them give you a genuine link to a tartan. If you come up with nothing then you can always fall back on what we call a District tartan. This is one that has been designated as being suitable for people from a particular area - a city or locality in Scotland.

If you don't fancy that idea then, then there are quite a few general tartans that can be worn by anyone plus a growing number of 'Fashion' tartans.

At the end of the day you can actually wear any clan tartan that you like even if you don't have a connection, but most people like to feel their use of a tartan is 'genetically' justified.

We have a Scottish customer who came to Cleveland for a 2-year job. He didn't bring any of his kilts with him, so he stopped in to grab a few. We asked him about the "rules" of wearing tartans. He told us, "Unless you're going to a wedding, a funeral, or a family gathering, you can wear whatever you want. If I'm heading out to the pub, I grab whichever kilt I want and go. There are no rules."

Nick is Italian and Polish. Jefferson is German and Jewish. We both wear kilts because they're comfortable. End of story.

Meet your Kilted Bros

Jeff

Springfield, IL

This is my spouse and I at a recent black tie formal event. The kilts were a hit!!!

Barry

Niles, Michigan

Recently widowed, 58, hairdresser for 36 years, recently started driving school bus. Only own on Kilted Bros kilt, the others I own are Utilikilts, found Kilted Bros to be more affordable and like the Kilted Bros community!

Max

Winter Garden, FL

American Leatherboy 2015

I love wearing kilts. There is just something freeing and hit about wearing one.

Jim

Baltimore, Maryland

I live in the Baltimore area, and enjoy wearing a kilt. It's easier for me to wear one of my kilts when my bagpipes are with me. I'm usually kilted (or sometimes less) around my friends.

Joe

Wickliffe, Ohio

My name is Joe. I am a 57 year old musician (keyboard player) living east of Cleveland. Besides my music I enjoy Jeopardy, a wonderful life with my husband and using braille to find out what men look like. (Works best with eyes closed)

Scott

Clearwater, FL

Daddy that loves wearing his kilts any where possible

AJ

Syracuse, New York

I'm a Lutheran (ELCA) Pastor, that is a totally out member of the LGBTQ community. I play the Pipes. And, I no longer own a traditional black suit. My motto is: Sharing God's love with the world, one tartan at a time! 😉

Chuck

Cleveland, Ohio

Hello, my name is Chuck. I was born and raised in Struthers Ohio. Since no one has ever heard of it I just say the Southside of Youngstown. I've been living in Cleveland for 2.5 years now. Just trying to get my shit together. I'm into music and art. I love working with local bands, that affords me the opportunity to meet really awesome people. For all of you wondering, no I'm not gay. If you have to label me, according to the Millennials on tumblr, I'm what they call pansexual. Ether way I'm not officially "out" in my area. Yes people know and it's not like I'm hiding it. I just don't feel the need to proclaim my sexuality to everyone I know or will ever meet. I never understood that practice. Anyway I hope you enjoy my pics. I'm also on Snapchat and Tumblr. Feel free to search for me or just ask.

Jim

Tampa, FL

Regular guy here. Enjoy playing basketball, softball and music concerts.

Major Stev

Bethel, Oxford county, Maine

Regular gentleman farmer/volunteer firefighter. Fun loving, collector of rare books and art. Deeply dedicated to my community and friends. Ginger and now graying some after an exciting career that took me around the world.

Tourist Tips for Edinburgh: How Not to Annoy the Locals

About Edinburgh

Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe and attracts millions of tourists each year. This article provides you with some tips from the point of view of a local to help you avoid being a typical 'annoying tourist' and also helps you avoid some of the typical tourist traps.

Make Sure You Know You Are Not in England

One of the worst faux pas you can commit in Scotland is to believe you are in England. Scotland is not part of England, but a separate nation that joined with England in a Union in 1707 to form Great Britain.

In 2014 there was a referendum on whether Scotland should become an independent country. The result was close, but Scotland voted to stay in the United Kingdom. Regardless no Scot is happy about their country being mistaken as part of England.

The video below provides a handy guide on the difference between the UK, Great Britain and England.

(Also note we in the UK like to think of ourselves as different from the rest of Europe. We don't tend to talk of vacations to Europe, but holidays to Spain, France or Germany, as to us they are all distinct countries.)

Scottish Ancestry

During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries millions of people emigrated from Scotland to Canada, the United States, Australia, and many other countries throughout the world. It is great that their descendants wish to come and visit the country their ancestors came from. Just don't expect the locals to be really impressed that your 'great great grandmother came from the clan Campbell, and was brought up on the Isle of Skye'. There are millions like you.

When to Wear Kilts

Feel free to wear a kilt in Scotland whenever you feel like it. However you should be aware that most Scottish people only wear kilts on special occasions, for example to weddings or ceilidhs.

You are quite welcome to proudly wear your kilt whilst walking along Edinburgh's busiest shopping street, just bear in mind that it is most likely to identify you as 'wealthy American tourist who thinks he is Scottish' in the minds of observers.

Buying Your Own Clan's Tartan

Despite what the owners of hundreds of shops in Edinburgh would like you to believe, your clan probably does not have its own tartan pattern going back hundreds of years.

There is evidence that highlanders wore tartan cloth as far back as the seventeenth century. It was worn in the eighteenth century by members of the Highland Regiment Clan, and there is some evidence to suggest that members of different families may have worn different colours so they could be told apart.

However the tradition of tartan as Scotland's national dress dates from the nineteenth century when it was popularized by George IV, and a romantised version of Scotland's past. The rules about which tartan you can wear depending on which family you come from all date from then. Admittedly some people do take tartan seriously, and if you are joining some sort of 'clan gathering' it may be worth researching properly. Otherwise approach your purchase with a degree of cynicism, and if your tartan happens to be a particularly hideous combination of colours, don't feel bad for buying a different one, and be aware that the tartan you buy in many of the tourist shops was most likely made in China anyway.

Also note that most 'clans' come from the North of Scotland. If your ancestors came from the Lowlands your links to tartan are even more tenuous.

About Edinburgh

Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe and attracts millions of tourists each year. This article provides you with some tips from the point of view of a local to help you avoid being a typical 'annoying tourist' and also helps you avoid some of the typical tourist traps.

Make Sure You Know You Are Not in England

One of the worst faux pas you can commit in Scotland is to believe you are in England. Scotland is not part of England, but a separate nation that joined with England in a Union in 1707 to form Great Britain.

In 2014 there was a referendum on whether Scotland should become an independent country. The result was close, but Scotland voted to stay in the United Kingdom. Regardless no Scot is happy about their country being mistaken as part of England.

The video below provides a handy guide on the difference between the UK, Great Britain and England.

(Also note we in the UK like to think of ourselves as different from the rest of Europe. We don't tend to talk of vacations to Europe, but holidays to Spain, France or Germany, as to us they are all distinct countries.)

Scottish Ancestry

During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries millions of people emigrated from Scotland to Canada, the United States, Australia, and many other countries throughout the world. It is great that their descendants wish to come and visit the country their ancestors came from. Just don't expect the locals to be really impressed that your 'great great grandmother came from the clan Campbell, and was brought up on the Isle of Skye'. There are millions like you.

When to Wear Kilts

Feel free to wear a kilt in Scotland whenever you feel like it. However you should be aware that most Scottish people only wear kilts on special occasions, for example to weddings or ceilidhs.

You are quite welcome to proudly wear your kilt whilst walking along Edinburgh's busiest shopping street, just bear in mind that it is most likely to identify you as 'wealthy American tourist who thinks he is Scottish' in the minds of observers.

Buying Your Own Clan's Tartan

Despite what the owners of hundreds of shops in Edinburgh would like you to believe, your clan probably does not have its own tartan pattern going back hundreds of years.

There is evidence that highlanders wore tartan cloth as far back as the seventeenth century. It was worn in the eighteenth century by members of the Highland Regiment Clan, and there is some evidence to suggest that members of different families may have worn different colours so they could be told apart.

However the tradition of tartan as Scotland's national dress dates from the nineteenth century when it was popularized by George IV, and a romantised version of Scotland's past. The rules about which tartan you can wear depending on which family you come from all date from then. Admittedly some people do take tartan seriously, and if you are joining some sort of 'clan gathering' it may be worth researching properly. Otherwise approach your purchase with a degree of cynicism, and if your tartan happens to be a particularly hideous combination of colours, don't feel bad for buying a different one, and be aware that the tartan you buy in many of the tourist shops was most likely made in China anyway.

Also note that most 'clans' come from the North of Scotland. If your ancestors came from the Lowlands your links to tartan are even more tenuous.

For the rest of the article, visit Tourist Tips here.

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