Mountain Sherpas By Austin platt

In order to conquer Mount Everest, climbers must rely on the guidance of the sherpas to be successful.

Mount Everest and its peak

Mount Everest, located in the Himalayas, is the one of the tallest mountains in the world, and stands at 29,029 feet tall. This is by far the most challenging mountain to climb in the world, because of the numerous risks that are involved. Not only is the terrain challenging, even for the most experienced climbers, but the high altitudes coupled with unpredictable weather make climbing Everest one of the most challenging experiences one might ever have.

The memoir that guided me through my research

My research comes from the book Into Thin Air, a memoir written by Jon Krakauer. He informs the reader about his climb on Mount Everest and how he was successful, although others on that same climb did not survive.

Looking directly at the most challenging mountain to climb

Theme of the novel with HOW it relates to your chosen topic: If you don’t succeed at first, try again. This relates to my topic because it falls under the perseverance category. In order to conquer Mount Everest or another tall mountain, you must persevere and rely on the sherpas to succeed.

How does the novel address your research topic? This addresses my research topic because I want to learn more about how the sherpas are so skilled when it comes down to climbing treacherous mountains.

Another quote that relates to my research topic: “It ain't over till it's over” - Yogi Berra...This also relates to my topic because he is encouraging everybody (in this case climbers) to keep fighting until one of two things happen: You prevail, or you quit because you know for sure there is no possible way you can succeed.

FALSE, but there is some truth

Note card 1: CNN: Altitude sickness can strike as low as a few thousand meters, and the human body must adapt as greater heights are reached. "If you go straight up to 3,500 meters, the next morning you'll feel like you have the flu or a hangover," said Levitt. The same is not true of Sherpas. The conditions for a normal human are very harsh, because altitude sickness can occur just a few thousand feet up. However, sherpas do not experience the same because they live so close to the mountains. Sherpas are essential in order for a group of people to conquer a mountain.

Note Card 2: Nat Geo: “The cheerful smiles and legendary strength of the Sherpas have been an integral part of Everest climbing expeditions from the very beginning. Indeed, very few significant successes have been achieved without them.” Sherpas are reliable people that have been trustworthy for many years, This is because Sherpas have been on almost every successful climb. The Sherpas are important guides when ordinary people are faced to climb mountains with harsh conditions.

Note Card 3: Nat Geo: A year later, it happened again. This time, the earthquake triggered an avalanche that took at least 18 lives at Everest base camp, 10 of them Sherpa. The twin tragedies jeopardized the millions of tourist dollars Everest brings into cash-strapped Nepal. Each permit alone draws $11,000, though groups split the cost. This year, 289 climbers are taking their chances, a drop of about 20 percent from 2015. The first team of Sherpa workers reached the summit Wednesday, ferrying equipment and securing ropes for paying clients who will try for the top during a short window of good weather. A three-man British-Mexican team summited the next day with guides. But the last two years have left members of the tight-knit Sherpa community wondering if the risk is still worth it. Climbing such are hard mountain like Everest is not an easy task, and sometimes not even the Sherpas can handle such a tall task.

Note Card 4: Database: It isn’t unheard of for climbers to get into testy exchanges at high altitudes, where big egos meet thin air. One can reasonably argue over what happened on the Lhotse Face, and who deserves a greater share of the blame, even within a context of cultural, historical, and economic grievance. Many of the facts at hand—falling ice, who touched whom and in what order, the nature or validity of the prohibition against climbing that day—are in dispute, and yet may be of middling significance in light of what happened next. Although the intention of the Sherpas is to be amicable, it appears that sometimes it doesn’t always turn out that way. In this situation, there was much violence between the climbers and the Sherpas, so this conveys not all of the relationships are perfect.

Note Card 5: Nat Geo Database: Since the first expeditions in the 1920's, 99 Sherpas and other Nepalis have been killed on Everest—about 40 percent of all climbing deaths there. Sherpas working on Everest normally don't die en masses. Apart from their darkest seasons—1922, 1970, and now, 2014, the darkest of all—they tend to perish one by one, casualties of crevasse falls, avalanches, and altitude sickness. Everest has been the leading cause for fatalities since the very first climbs. There are many ways that people can die, and Everest is the setting where it happens the most.

Essential Question: How does learning information through multiple perspectives and genres influence your understanding of a topic? Learning information through multiple perspectives and genres can influence one's understanding in several ways. Since there are different ways to present a topic, different websites or databases that are credible can differ their perspective of a topic compared to other sources, like a magazine or book. In this case, those who have climbed Everest and other treacherous mountains might have a different opinion than a database. This is how learning information through multiple perspectives can influence one's understanding of a topic.

Works Cited: Bos, Carole. “Sherpas and Their Dangerous Job on Mt. Everest.” AwesomeStories.com, 15 June 2016, www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Sherpas-and-Their-Dangerous-Job-on-Mt.-Everest. TRAAP score 14. The author is credible because there are some media credits from BBC and other reliable sites. The information is mostly facts, without bias, and it is specific to my research questions. There is a purpose to this particular website and there are no ads. Also, the structure of this site is easy to maneuver. Danielle, Preiss. "Sherpas First To Climb Mount Everest After 2 Years Of Avalanches." Weekend Edition Saturday (NPR) (2016): Points of View Reference Center. Web. 10 Jan. 2017. Hendwork, Brian. “The Sherpas of Mount Everest.” National Geographic, National Geographic Society, 10 May 2002, news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/05/0507_020507_sherpas.html. TR.A.A.P. Score:16. The author is credible because it is from a reliable site (Nat Geo), but it has not been updated in the past decade. The information is relevant for my topic and there is also no bias in it. There is also a distinct purpose for this site. All of the grammar and conventions have been updated, but there are some ads. http://web.a.ebscohost.com/pov/detail/detail?sid=4f200a97-0ec7-4f23-8d3b-fe96c9771ab4%40sessionmgr40... This author is credible because it is a first - hand account and it is a database. Also, this is mostly facts from an altercation and it is relevant to my research. There is a purpose to this database, and all of the grammar is correct. Senthilingam, Meera. “The Biological Secrets That Make Sherpas Superhuman Mountaineers.” CNN, Cable News Network, 7 Oct. 2016, www.cnn.com/2015/11/11/health/sherpas-superhuman-mountaineers/. T.R.A.A.P. Score:17. The author is credible because it is from a reliable site (CNN) and it has been edited in the past few months. There is no bias or opinions, there is a purpose to this website, and it is relevant information for my topic. All of the grammar is updated, there are no ads, and it is easy to read because it is fluent. “Sherpas - Climbers Guide to Everest.” Sherpas - Climbers Guide to Everest, ExplorersWeb Inc, www.mounteverest.net/expguide/sherpas.htm. TR.A.A.P. Score:16. The author is credible because it is from a reliable source, but there is no author. The information is relevant for my research questions and there is a definite purpose for the site. There are several ads, but the spelling and grammar has been updated. “Sherpas: The Invisible Men of Everest.” National Geographic, National Geographic Society, news.nationalgeographic.com/news/special-features/2014/04/140426-sherpa-culture-everest-disaster/. TR.A.A.P. Score:15. The author is credible because it is from a reliable source, but there is no author.The information is relevant for my research questions and there is a definite purpose for the site. There are several ads, but the spelling and grammar has been updated.

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