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Urinary Tract Infection Quantitative Real-Time PCR

Custom Panels Offering Next Day Results

By utilizing quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) to rapidly analyze your patient’s sample in 24 hours, qPCR technology precisely detects the correct pathogen(s) and identifies antibiotic drug resistance. This allows providers the ability to prescribe timely and effective treatment.

Rx Guidance is also available to compliment our molecular pathology reports by recommending the most appropriate drug, dose, and duration of treatment based on the results of our qPCR results and the presence of antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

Almost half of all women will acquire a urinary tract infection (UTI) at least once in their lifetime.

Normally, antibiotics are highly effective in treating UTIs. But without antibiotics, the infection can spread into the kidneys or the bloodstream, causing severe illness.

Our Target Pathogens

Urinary Tract Infection Panel

Bacteria

  • Acinetobacter baumanii
  • Citrobacter freundii
  • Escherichia coli
  • Enterobacter aerogenes
  • Enterobacter cloacae
  • Enterococcus faecalis
  • Enterococcus faecium
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • Mycobacterium avium
  • Mycobacterium intracellulare
  • Mycobacterium kansasii
  • Proteus mirabilis
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Serratia marcescens
  • Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus
  • Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS), Streptococcus pyogenes

Fungal

  • Candida albicans
  • Candida glabrata
  • Candida parapsilosis
  • Candida tropicalis
Understanding how to successfully manage a treatment plan begins with a timely and highly accurate diagnosis.

Antibiotic Resistance Panel

  • VanA, VanB (Vancomycin Resistance genes)
  • mecA (Methicillinresistance gene)
  • ermB, C; mefA (Macrolide Lincosamide Streptogramin Resistance)
  • qnrA2 (Fluoroquinolone resistance genes)
  • tet M (Tetracycline resistance genes)
  • SHV, KPC Groups (Class A beta lactamase)
  • CTX-M1 (15), M2 (2), M9 (9), M8/25 Groups (Class A beta lactamase)
  • IMP, NDM, VIM Groups (Class B metallo beta lactamase)
  • ACT, MIR, FOX, ACC Groups (AmpC beta lactamase)
  • OXA-48,-51 (Class Doxacillinase)
  • PER-1/VEB-1/GES-1 Groups (Minor Extended Spectrum beta lactamases)
  • dfr (A1, A5), sul (1, 2) probes (Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole resistance)

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"UTI'S ARE THE TENTH MOST LIKELY REASON FOR A MEDICARE PATIENT TO HAVE AN UNPLANNED READMISSION TO THE HOSPITAL." ~INFECTIOUS DISEASES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Our Report

UTI's are among the most common infectious diseases and contributor to high financial burden worldwide, administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy is the key to achieving good therapeutic outcomes.

www.gracemedicalconsultants.com

Created By
Grace Medical Consultants
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Credits:

Created with images by designer491 - "Paper with urinary tract infection and pills. " • Davizro Photography - "Gown doctor with blisters pills in pocket" • meenon - "urine bag use for observe clinical in shock patient or treatment" • Vlad Kochelaevskiy - "Build hospital"

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