Tuberculosis BY MATT BUHLIG

WHAT IS IT?

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that mostly affects the lungs. It is spread through tiny particles when someone coughs or sneezes who has tuberculosis. Tuberculosis, also known as TB, cannot be fought when an infected person also has HIV. It is rarely deadly if you don't have HIV. Unfortunately, most strains resist medications, but it can be treated. It is rare. There are fewer that 200,000 U.S cases per year.

WHAT CAUSES IT?

TB is caused when someone who has it, and is untreated coughs, sneezes, sings, or laughs. Infected particles from that person land on another person's body. However, it's only contagious if it is completely untreated.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Symptoms of TB include: coughing up blood, excessive coughing, chest pain while breathing, unintentional weight loss, fatigue, fever, night sweats, chills and loss of appetite, if it occurs in the lungs. Symptoms can vary if it affects other areas of the body. For example, if you have spinal TB, you will have spinal pain.

HOW IS IT TREATED?

The infected person is given medication. However, some strands resist normal medication, and the person is given a very strong dose to combat TB. If you have HIV and also have TB, a hospital visit is required to treat it because the body cannot fight TB on it's own.

HOW CAN YOU PREVENT IT?

TB can be prevented by simply isolating and treating an infected person. By keeping an infected person isolated until they are treated means the disease cannot spread, and no more people can be infected with TB.

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