SUSAN B. ANTHONY Emily Maxey

American women's rights activist, abolitionist, and women's suffrage leader

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

  • Susan B. Anthony was born in Adams, Massachusetts on February 15, 1820. She was the second of seven children in her family. Her father was a cotton-mill owner who taught his children to show their love for God through helping other people.
  • Anthony was brought up in a Quaker family with long activist traditions.
  • As Anthony grew up, she helped her family pay bills by teaching. During this time (1850's), Anthony developed strong opinions on slavery, women's rights, and temperance.
  • Her strong views would cause her to be a leading figure in the Women's Suffrage Movement.

WOMEN'S RIGHTS

  • Susan B. Anthony attended the first women's rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York with her family in 1848.
  • However, she did not take up the case until 1851. Up until that time, Anthony had devoted most of her time to the temperance movement (avoidance of alcohol). Male members of the movement refused to let her speak at rallies because she was a woman.
  • This caused Anthony to realize that women had to win the right to speak in public and to vote before they could accomplish anything else.
  • With the outbreak of the Civil War, Anthony focused her attention on ending slavery. She organized the Women's National Loyal League, which gathered petitions to force passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution to end slavery.
  • After the war, she focused her efforts on the right for women to vote.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND IMPACT

  • Organized the National Women Suffrage Association
  • 1872: Susan B. Anthony and fifteen supporters from Rochester became the first women ever to vote in a presidential election.
  • She gathered petitions from 26 states with 10,000 signatures, but Congress laughed at them. She appeared before every congress from 1869 to 1906 to ask for passage of a suffrage amendment.
  • Anthony died on March 13, 1906 in Rochester.
  • Fourteen years after her death, the Nineteenth Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, was added to the U.S. Constitution.

SOURCES

http://susanbanthonyhouse.org/her-story/biography.php

http://www.notablebiographies.com/An-Ba/Anthony-Susan-B.html

http://www.history.com/topics/womens-history/susan-b-anthony

Credits:

Created with images by frankieleon - "Susan B in the hizzy" • ulleo - "books book stack isolated"

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