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Process Journal Madeleine Jones EDVT11022

Design brief

Your school is holding a textile showcase to raise money for their whole school project, which aims to support children who have been subjected to child labour. The entire school community is invited to attend and all ticket sales will go straight to supporting the project. Your principal has asked the year 10 Home Economics textile class to create an item that will be displayed at the school textile showcase. Your item will need to demonstrate a range of sewing skills and in an effort to promote ethical understanding, the principal has requested that the item be constructed with a minimum of 90% recycled products/items/fabrics. You will have 8 weeks to complete the textile item and it will need to be submitted in week 8 of term 4. You have been provided with a budget of $20.00 to complete the item

Mood Board

Considerations

Must be appropriate for textile showcase and school community

Must consider ethical consumerism

Incorporate elements and principals of design

Suitability of fabric for textile item

Constraints

Must use a range and high level of sewing techniques

Must be constructed from 90% recycled items

Able to be completed in the time frame: 8 weeks

Must be constructed within budget: $20

Research on Design Brief

What is ethical consumerism and How can I make a textile item that is ethical?

Have you ever stopped to think, where do my clothes come from? Or how do my choices in clothing, food and many other every day things positively or negatively effect the world we live in? If this questions have crossed your mind, then you have been considering ethical consumerism. How do we define ethical consumerism? Ethical consumerism can be defined as the practice of purchasing products and services produced in a way that minimises social and/or environmental damage, while avoiding products and services deemed to have a negative impact on society or the environment (https://www.igd.com/)

there are many ways to create a textile item that is follows ethical practice. These consist of:

  • using recycled items and fabric to construct your design. These can come from second hand store, schools that have left over fabrics, families members who may be getting rid of textile products
  • buy already made garments from second hand stores and re-design and re-construct them into contemporary garments/textile items
  • if you are going to buy fabric, ensure it is purchased from a store who is ethically certified and make sure the fabric is an ethical choice.

Elements and principles of design

Colour: Colour is the first thing people notice when looking at a design. Colours are classified into three groups: primary, secondary and tertiary.

Direction: Is the way the line runs on a fabric this can be either horizontal, vertical or diagonal.

Line: Lines can run in many different directions, be different widths and create a number of illusions, therefore the line and direction of a line can have a huge impact on the design being produced. Example: pinstriping.

Shape: Is usually utilised as a design on a fabric, therefore shapes are limitless and quiet often are symbolic of something. Example: polka dot fabric.

Size: Refers to the amount of space that an object takes up.

Texture: Describes the way something feels – such as soft, hard, smooth or rough.

Value: Value is the lightness to darkness of a colour.

Balance: If a design is balanced, it is said to be in a state of equilibrium. Designs can be balanced symmetrically or asymmetrically. Symmetrical balance occurs if one side of the design looks exactly like the other side. This creates a formal effect. Asymmetrical balance occurs when one side of the design looks different from the other side. This creates an informal effect.

Emphasis: Uses the elements of design to draw attention to a particular area.

Proportion: Involves dividing a design into parts and deciding whether a harmonious effect if created.

Repetition: Repetition involves using the same design again and again. This can create a uniform or busy look, depending on the designer’s intentions.

Rhythm: Rhythm is a continuous flowing movement. Rhythm deals greatly with the elements of line and direction.

Nelson, A. (2017). Process Journal Powerpoint, week 5. unpublished learning activity. CQUniversity Australia.

3 Design Choices

Design one - Pouf/ottoman

RepetitionRepetitionRepetitionThis design meets the design brief as it would be constructed from at least 90% of recycled products, this is because the denim and fabric has been purchased from a second hand store or recycled from home. It would come under budget because everything except the thread/cotton are purchased from a second hand store or recycled from home. the pouf is also very suitable for a textile showcase as it can be easily displayed. The item has colour contrast and emphasis through the denim and floral patch, it has line through the denim seams as well as pockets and seams that are already on the jeans and the texture is smooth. Repitition is also evident through the panels of denim. The only negative that this design has, is that it does not show a large amount of sewing skills.

Design 2

This tote bag meets the design brief as it would be constructed from at least 90% of recycled products, this is because the fabric has been sourced from 2nd hand stores or recycled from home. it would come under budget because everything except the thread/cotton are purchased from a second hand store or recycled from home. The bag is also very suitable for a textile showcase as it can be easily displayed. The item has colour contrast through the denim outer and pink lining, it The only negative that this design has, is that it is a little boring and has a 90's feel to it.

Design three

This design meets the design brief as it would be constructed from at least 90% of recycled products, this is because the dress undergarment would be purchased from a second hand store and the CD's/DVD's are recycled from home/family/friends. It would come under budget because everything except the thread/cotton are purchased from a second hand store or recycled from home. the dress is also very suitable for a textile showcase. The item has colour contract and emphasis through the CD's, particularly when they catch the light. Repetition through evident through the the CD's/DVD. The texture would be rough/sharp. The only negative that this design has, is that it does not show a large amount of sewing skills and the hand sewing of the CD's would be incredibly time consuming.

Chosen Design and Construction

the chosen design is number one - the pouf/ottoman

This is because:

  • it meets the design brief - recycled products, suitable for textile show, under budget etc
  • it can be made within the required time frame
  • it is something that I have always wanted to make and will be used in my home

Construction steps

What you need

Pattern print-outs

Scissors

at least 6 pairs of jeans

Straight pins

Sewing machine

cotton

2 large garbage bags full of fabric items for stuffing (e.g. old clothing, worn towels, jeans, old pillows etc)

Large hand sewing needle

1m contrast fabric for top and bottom of pouf

Steps

Cut out pattern and stick together

pin pattern onto denim jeans and cut 8 pieces

pin two pieces together at a time and using a straight stitch and 1.5 inch seam allowance, sew along pinned side removing pins as you sew, to create pairs of panels.

following above step, sew pairs together and then sew two halves together

once you have a whole pouf constructed, turn inside out so the right side are on the outside.

Hem the hexagonal top and bottom pieces with 1.5cm hems pin bottom hexagon piece to bottom of pouf

begin stuffing pouf and once full, sew hexagonal pieces on the top and bottom of the pouf using a slip stitch.

put your feet up and enjoy!

Design Evaluation

Overall, the construction of the pouf/ottoman went well. There was no major issues and it was relatively easy to sew. What worked really well was the placement of the pockets that were already on the jeans. This means the pouf has storage for things like TV remotes. The pouf would have been even better if I placed some more hexagonal patches all over the pouf as embellishments and to create more repetition. Although I could have done more in terms of embellishments, I am very happy with the product and it is already being used in my house. My husband loves it. I believe the pouf satisfies the key and basic factors. This is evident through meeting the design brief. I was able to purchase the jeans from a second hand store for a total of $8.00. I did not spend any money on the stuffing as it was all recycled from home or donated from my family members. The stuffing it made from the offcuts of the jeans, 2 bath mats, 2 large sheets and 4 pillows. I believe the pouf is a completely ethical item. The construction techniques were appropriate because it is well constructed and meets a pouf’s basic requirement – that is it can hold a person’s feet up. It was completed with accuracy and there are no sewing issues/problems evident. If I was to do this again, I would definitely use the same pattern but I would like to use different fabrics, potentially something more modern to suit my home. I would also do a decorate hand stitch all over the seams to create eye catching detail. I believe I definitely achieved my goals, which was to create a textile item, that was constructed of a minimum of 90% recycled items, show a range of sewing techniques and be under budget. Most importantly, my textile item comes under ethical consumption, which is something that is very important to me. I care about the environment and want to ensure it is here for our future generations.

Credits:

Created with images by lauraapriljayne - "Mood board/theme" • familymwr - "Photographers expand horizons in 2010 Army Digital Photography Contest 110311"

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