Goblin Shark BY ERIN VICTORIA FELTS

The goblin shark swims a average of 6 mph. , but when catching food is can reach 12 mph

A goblin shark protects itself by using it's head and it's horn.

The goblin shark has been caught in all three major oceans, indicating a wide global distribution. In the Atlantic Ocean, it has been recorded from the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Individuals of this species have been found in the Pacific Ocean.

It has a thin body with a skin covered with dermal denticles. Its blood vessels are very close to the skin, which gives it a pink hue. It has five pairs of gill slits, two small rounded dorsal fins, short and wide pectoral fins, one anal fin smaller than the dorsal fin, and a caudal fin with a poorly developed lower lobe.

The Goblin sharks jaw is on a hinge. It can swing out of the mouth when feeding!

In the deep ocean, there is no light, it's eyes are very small, and almost useless, however, it's long flat snout is full of electromagnetic sensors that can detect its prey.

The males tend to sneak up onto the female (who is usually bigger than the male). The male will then bite the female around the gills to stabilize her and he will insert one of his claspers into her cloacae to deliver his sperm

The life span of a shark can be around 20 to 30 years.

The Goblin Shark mostly feeds on fish, mollusks and crab, and it poses no real danger to humans.

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