Good Life Tour of the Harn By James dika

The "Gloucester" is definitely a piece of work that I am glad to have seen in person. Viewing this painting through a phone or a computer would not have done it justice. Through the lens of a camera, it is clear that this painting requires a great deal of skill. However, viewing this painting in person really drives home the skill level that Childe Hassam needed to put together such a work of art. What really amazes me is the level of detail that Hassam incorporated into this oil on panel. Its almost as if each individual leaf can be told apart on each tree. One can even notice that the structures across the river have windows. This communicates to me the grandeur of human civilization and the eloquence of nature. This painting left me feeling appreciative of the beauty of our world that we often disregard.

"Gloucester" oil on panel painting by Childe Hassam. Taken at the Harn museum of art.

The Asian art wing of the Harn museum of art is by far my favorite exhibition. I really felt as if the museum did a great job with the level of interaction that they gave this exhibit. The outdoor section of this wing allows the viewer to feel as if he is in the environment in which this art was created. The windows allow for a great deal of natural lighting, which is in my opinion preferable in an art exhibit. Aside from this, I really enjoyed the sheer amount of art work and skill found in this exhibit. Their was enough spacing in between all of the art so as to not overwhelm me and allow me to take my time in enjoying the art. The exhibit left me feeling curious as to the motivation behind each of the pieces, particularly the larger one pictured below.

Picture of the Asian art wing of the Harn museum

These face masks definitely appeal to what I regard as beauty. The Igbibio people of Nigeria believed that the deceased that led moral lives would be allowed to move onto the spirit world. Those who led immoral lives were in contrast barred from entry into the spirit world and were forced to remain behind and wander endlessly. Pictured below are the "faces" of the bad spirits. By picturing the immoral spirits in such a grotesque manner, these masks reaffirm my belief that beauty is within the content of one's character and that those who live immorally are not beautiful. The face masks do not necessarily arouse any emotions in me. Rather, they leave me pensive about the type of life I lead.

"Face Mask (mbop) created by the Ibibio people of Nigeria. Pictured in the Harn museum

The Good Life theme most present in this photograph is adversity. The photograph pictures three girls holding hands standing in,, what appears to be an uncivilized area. The pictured girls are wide-eyed and do not look remotely happy. This photograph really brings to light the subject of poverty. The photograph forces the viewer to imagine himself or herself in a similar position and leaves him or her yearning for social justice.

"Three girls holding hands" by Sebastiao Salgado. Pictured at the Harn museum

1st painting - "Gloucester" oil on panel painting by Childe Hassam. Taken at the Harn museum of art. 2nd painting- Picture of the Asian art wing of the Harn museum 3rd painting- "Face Mask (mbop) created by the Ibibio people of Nigeria. Pictured in the Harn museum 4th painting - "Face Mask (mbop) created by the Ibibio people of Nigeria. Pictured in the Harn museum

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