Montgomery Bus Boycotts Emily Roder

Where and when did this happen?

The Montgomery Bus Boycotts took place from December 5, 1955 to December 20, 1956. African Americans refused to ride the city buses in Montgomery, Alabama in order to stop segregation on public buses.

what lead to the bus boycotts?

Just 4 days before the Bus Boycotts began, Rosa Parks was arrested for not giving up her seat on a Montgomery bus for a white man. Rosa Parks was arrested and fined. The bus boycotts first began on Parks’s first court hearing and lasted for just over a year.

Rosa Parks & The bus boycott

What was the goal of the bus boycotts?

African Americans refused to ride the buses to protest segregated seating. They wanted to be able to sit wherever they wanted and they also wanted there to be the hiring of more black drivers. At first the goal did not include changing the segregation laws, but a group of African American men fought to eliminate the bus segregation laws.

Who was involved in the bus boycotts?

About 40,000 African Americans were involved in the bus boycotts. The majority of African Americans living in the city, boycotted the the bus system. African American leaders in the capital of the city and ministers supported and spread the word about the bus boycotts. Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the leaders of the bus boycotts. He became a national leader of the civil rights movement and believed in nonviolent protesting. Before the start of the bus boycotts, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus and her actions lead to the beginning of the bus boycotts.

What obstacles did people face & how did they overcome them?

African Americans who were involved with the bus boycotts had to find new ways of transportation. In addition, the group did not use any violent protest, but rather used nonviolent protesting. This was very hard for many not to retaliate. The K.K.K. used violent protesting in order to intimidate many people. This did not stop any African American protesters. African Americans had to find new ways to overcome these obstacles. They found new ways of transportation. They would carpool, walk, and many African American taxi drivers lowered their cost to the same as the bus price. The people continued with their nonviolent protesting and because of this method, they ended up winning their rights.

What was the outcome/lasting impacts of the event?

The Montgomery bus boycotts were the first large protests that occurred and lead to the civil rights movement. Because of the bus boycotts, Martin Luther King became a more prominent leader in the Civil Rights Movement. This lead him to creating the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and later delivering his “I Have a Dream” speech. The SCLC also helped with the Birmingham Riots and the March on Washington. The boycotts brought attention to civil rights struggles and lead to the end of segregation and brought the beginning of equal rights.

MlK & the bus boycott

Modern day inequality

The day after President Trump’s inauguration, a women’s march began on Washington. They planned to boycott any companies that supported Trump. The strike also included boycotting certain businesses. Many big name retailers broke their ties with Trump products in order to avoid the boycott. The women's march organizers also sided with many others in order to boycott banks. The event and boycotts took place in order to gain equal rights for women. These women wanted an end to racial profiling and wanted many more issues to be resolved.

Bibliography

HISTORY.com (n.d.). Montgomery Bus Boycott - Black History - HISTORY.com. HISTORY.com. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/montgomery-bus-boycott

Ushistory.org (n.d.). Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott [ushistory.org]. Ushistory.org. Retrieved from http://www.ushistory.org/us/54b.asp

N.a (n.d.). Rosa Parks and The Montgomery Bus Boycott, MLK - Wesleyan University. Wesleyan.edu. Retrieved from http://www.wesleyan.edu/mlk/posters/rosaparks.html

Eli Watkins, Cnn (6 Feb. 2017.). 'A day without a woman' -- Women's March organizers plan general strike. CNN. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/06/politics/general-strike-womens-march/index.html

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