Euthanasia Program Emily Winia and Angel Johnson

Euthanasia is described as the action of inducing a quiet and easy death, but, Nazi Germany took this and made it their own. Many people describe the Nazi's way as an expanded version of Charles Darwin's "survival of the fittest" theory.

Helene Melanie Lebel ID Card

The Euthanasia Program targeted children with deformities/disabilities, gays, Jews, gypsies and foreigners. These people were considered not having a purpose to humanity and were therefore punished for the ways they differed from the Nazi standard.

The Nazi's believed the right to live should be earned, not entitled. So, thousands of people who they believed didn't earn their rights were subjected to horrid treatments. Most children were forced to take lethal doses of medicine or starved. Adults were gassed or shot. All of the fallen victims were eventually cremated.

Gassing vans "Hospitals" Cremation
  • 1 in every 1,000 people were subjected to Nazi Euthanasia
  • 40-60 people were gassed at once in a small van
  • Bodies were cremated 2-8 at a time
  • 5,000 children were killed and 7,700 handicapped patients fell early
  • 70,273 died from gassing and 20,000 from lethal injection
Examples of victims you may find in a Euthanasia facility during the Nazi regime
Telford Taylor

"Death is life-just as much as birth. It was never meant to be murder." -Telford Taylor, chief of counsel for prosecution during Nuremberg Trials.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum “Holocaust Encyclopedia” United States Holocaust Memorial Museum United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum United States Holocaust Memorial Museum United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

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