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Sixth Form Open Evening 2021 The Bishop of Llandaff High School

Contents

Exploring the Sixth Form Virtual Open Evening

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Sixth Form Open Evening Presentation

Marc Belli - Executive Headteacher Sarah Parry - Head of School

Presentation for External Students

Miss S Rees - Assistant Headteacher/Head of Sixth Form

Email Contact: reess@bishopofllandaff.org

Student President and Vice President

Shivam - President

Holly - Vice President

Sixth Form Application Process

When applying for a place in the school's sixth form, please follow the link below to access the application form and an options booklet, summarising the courses offered from September 2022. The majority of information outlined in the options booklet can also be found in the 'Subject Information' section of this virtual open evening.

Once completed, please return your application form to our admissions officer, Mrs Burke. This can be done by emailing the form to the address below or by posting to the school address, marked for the attention of Mrs Burke.

Email Contact: burkeg@bishopofllandaff.org

A Level Fine Art

Students will research the work of other artists, develop skills and interpret ideas, themes and subject matter creativity. With help and direction they decide on a theme for their project which develops their creative, intellectual and technical skills through the disciplines of drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, textiles, digital imagery and installation. In order to succeed students need to have an enquiring mind and an enjoyment of creative making. They have the option of developing skills and ideas within any specialist area depending on what is most appropriate to their chosen specialist area of study. Coursework ideas are discussed in class and during the first term students will learn a range of new processes and techniques. There is a dedicated studio for independent study during non-contact time and students must write a minimum of 1000 words documenting the development of their coursework. The A Level exam is undertaken during the spring term, coursework is presented for internal assessment in February and exam work during April. Your work is presented for public exhibition and external examination in June.

AS Level: Personal Creative Enquiry - Non Examination Assessment (40% of A Level qualification or 100% of AS qualification). Students are required to produce an extended, exploratory project/portfolio and outcome(s) based on themes and subject matter which are personal and meaningful to the student. The Enquiry must integrate practical and theoretical work.

A Level: The course consists of two integrated constituent parts - A2 Unit 2 (36% of A Level) An in-depth critical, practical and theoretical investigative project/portfolio and outcome(s) based on themes and subject matter of personal significance. There is an extended written element of 1000 words (minimum). A2 Unit 3 Externally Set Assignment (24% of A Level). This includes a period of preparatory work followed by a 15 hour period of sustained focused investigation conducted under exam conditions.

Progression Routes & Career Opportunities: Students are required to think creatively and innovatively, and be flexible within a variety of situations, useful skills when studying other subjects at degree level and much sought after by employers. Those wishing to pursue careers in architecture, web design, advertising or any of the new creative industries are advised to have studied Art A Level. Some students progress to study their chosen specialist areas at degree level following an Art Foundation Course. To view career opportunities and hear Art graduates talking about their work visit www.lightboxresource.co.uk.

Email contact: wicksa@bishopofllandandaff.org

Student Experiences

Level 3 BTEC Applied Biology

National Extended Certificate in Applied Human Biology (Equivalent to one A level). This course covers a vocational qualification focusing on applied science and reflects aspects of employment within establishments that use science.

The course is graded via a mix of internally assessed assignments (41.7%) and portfolio material and externally assessed exam and supervised assessment tasks (58.3%). In year 12, you will study 2 units: Unit 1 Principles and Applications of Science & Unit 2 Practical Scientific Procedures and Techniques.

The content in Unit 1 is an extensive range of foundation concepts in Biology. You will study how the human body functions at a genetic, cellular and tissue level. You will gain understanding of how human biology and lifestyle factors interact to affect the health of individuals and populations. In Unit 2, Learners will investigate the effect of antimicrobial agents on the growth of microorganisms, by selecting and applying knowledge of microorganisms and infectious diseases.

In Year 13, 2 further units will be covered: Unit 3 Human Biology and Health Issues & Unit 4 Functional Physiology. In unit 3, Learners will further develop their understanding of human biology and skills in researching and evaluating the impact of health issues, initiatives and scientific reporting. Unit 4 includes detailed study of the muscular, skeletal, endocrine and nervous systems, their associated disorders and the role of homeostasis in controlling and coordinating the body systems Although this is a 2 year course, students can cash their year 12 modules to gain a Certificate in Applied Human Biology which is the equivalent to an AS Level.

Progression Routes & Career Opportunities: The course has been developed to give full-time students the opportunity to enter employment in the science sector or to progress to vocational qualifications such as the Edexcel Level 5 BTEC Higher Nationals or a degree courses in biology, chemistry, environmental science, forensic science, engineering, construction, health or sport related courses.

Email contact: emeryk@bishopofllandaff.org

Level 3 Applied Diploma in Business Studies

Level 3 Applied Diploma (A Level equivalent – Graded A*-E). Assessment Details: 50% Examination; 50% Non-Examination Assessment

An understanding of the business world is relevant to most job roles within the United Kingdom’s economy. This qualification is designed to provide students with the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills associated with business activities. It will prompt research, investigation and review of many aspects of business, to promote an awareness of the career opportunities available.

This qualification is designed primarily to support students progressing to university. It offers exciting and interesting experiences that focus on ‘applied learning’ ie. Learning through the acquisition of knowledge and understanding in purposeful contexts linked to the local, regional and national business environment. The qualification would support a student’s progression from any study at Level 2, particularly GCSE Business Studies.

Students must complete all units to obtain the Diploma (a ‘Certificate’ is also available which requires the completion of units 1 and 2 only). Unit 1 The Organisation – Survival and Prosperity (on-screen examination); Unit 2 Active Marketing (controlled assessment); Unit 3 Organisational Strategies and Decision Making (on-screen examination); Unit 4 Strategies and Decision Making for Retail Organisations* (on-screen examination); and Unit 5 Markets and Customers (controlled assessment) * Optional for those students wanting to pursue retail (instead of Unit 3)

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: This qualification will support students’ access to higher education degree courses. Alternatively, the qualification allows them to gain the required understanding and skills to undertake employment within business, including the retail sector.

Email contact: jenkinse@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology

Level 3 Applied Diploma (A Level equivalent – Graded A*-E)

WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology is a qualification with elements of psychology, law and sociology that complements studies in humanities. This is an Applied General qualification. This means it is designed primarily to support learners progressing to university. It has been designed to offer exciting and interesting experiences that focus learning for 16-19 year-old students through applied learning, ie. through the acquisition of knowledge and understanding in purposeful contexts linked to the criminal justice system.

The course is comprised of 4 units, units 1 and 2 in Year 12 and units 3 and 4 in Year 13; all of which are compulsory. These are: Unit 1 (Controlled Assessment 25%) - Changing awareness of crime: enables students to demonstrate an understanding of different types of crime, influences on perceptions of crime and why some crimes are unreported; Unit 2 (External Assessment 90 minute examination 25%) - Criminological Theories: allows students to gain an understanding of why people commit crime, drawing on what they have already learned in Unit 1; Unit 3 (Controlled Assessment 25%) - Crime scene to courtroom: provides an understanding of the criminal justice system from the moment a crime has been identified to the verdict. Students will develop the understanding and skills needed to examine information in order to review the justice of verdicts in criminal cases; and Unit 4 (External Assessment 90 minute examination 25%) - Crime and punishment: students will apply their understanding of the awareness of criminality, criminological theories and the process of bringing an accused to court in order to evaluate the effectiveness of social control to deliver criminal justice policy.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: An understanding of criminology is relevant to many job roles within the criminal justice sector, social and probation work and sociology and psychology. Level 3 applied qualifications provide transferable knowledge and skills that prepare students for progression to university. Level 3 criminology carries the same number of UCAS points as A level qualifications.

Email contact: kaidl@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

Level 3 Diploma in Food Science & Nutrition

An understanding of food science and nutrition is relevant to many industries and job roles. Care providers and nutritionists in hospitals use this knowledge, as do sports coaches and fitness instructors. Hotels and restaurants, food manufacturers and government agencies also use this understanding to develop menus, food products and policies that support healthy eating initiatives. Many employment opportunities within the field of food science and nutrition are available to graduates.

Year 12: Unit 1 Meeting Nutritional Needs of Specific Groups. This will be both internally and externally assessed. 90 minute examination; plus 15 minutes reading time (90 marks). There are three sections on each paper - Section A Short answer questions; Section B Extended answer questions; and Section C Related to a case study. Unit 2 Ensuring Food is Safe to Eat - This unit is externally assessed. An assignment will be produced each academic year and cannot be opened before 1st May. It is an eight hour timed, supervised assessment and students are not allowed to collaborate during times when they are working on the assessment tasks. This assessment is synoptic and requires students ‘to identify and use effectively in an integrated way an appropriate selection of skills, techniques, concepts, theories, and knowledge from across the course content’.

Year 13: Unit 3/Unit 4 - Units 1 and 2 are mandatory and provide a core breadth of knowledge and understanding. Students must then choose either Unit 3 or Unit 4. Both of these units require them to draw on the knowledge, skills and understanding gained in Units 1 and 2 in order to complete the assessment requirements. The ‘amplification’ section of the unit content in units 3 and 4 indicate where they will draw on learning from other units.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: Food industry and product development, health services, dietetics, food and nutrition, home economist, food manufacturing.

Email contact: patersong@bishopoflandaff.org

Student Experiences

Level 3 Applied Diploma in Tourism

Level 3 Applied Diploma (A Level equivalent – Graded A*-E)

This qualification is designed to support students who are interested in learning about the travel and tourism industry alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses. Although, not necessarily in travel and tourism-related subjects.

This qualification includes two mandatory units covering the following content areas. Year 12: Unit 1: The United Kingdom Tourism Project – the travel and tourism industry in the UK is growing and is of major importance to the economy (External Assessment 25%); Unit 2: Worldwide Tourism Destinations – students will investigate the features and appeal of global destinations and how reputation affects types of tourists (Internal Assessment 25%);

Year 13: Unit 3: The Dynamic Tourism Industry – students will explore how tourism adapts to the ever – changing industry, adapting to external pressures and changes in society, at a national and global scale (External Assessment 25%); and Unit 4: Event and itinerary planning – this is a synoptic unit in which students will understand the process of event management and the nature of tour itineraries in the UK (Internal Assessment 25%).

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: In addition to the travel and tourism sector-specific content, the requirements of the qualification will mean that students develop transferable skills, which are highly regarded by higher education providers and employers. The qualification will give students transferable knowledge, understanding and broad skills such as communicating and presenting ideas. All of the content in the qualification will help prepare students for further study.

We are generally referring to skills in the following three main categories: cognitive and problem-solving skills, using critical thinking, approaching non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions; interpersonal skills, communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation; and intra-personal skills, self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development.

Email contact: evansl@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Biology

The first module provides students with an understanding of the basic principles of cell biology and biochemistry. The second module involves the study of some of the animal systems. The A2 course allows further study of human systems and biochemistry as well as microbiology, ecology and genetics. There will be an option topic in the final unit. There are essential practical tasks throughout the course which will be performed during normal lessons and written up in a lab book. There are two examined theory modules taken each year – all of which are assessed in the summer exam session (Year 12 modules are each worth 20% of the A Level qualification, with the A2 modules each worth 25%). At A2 there is an assessed practical exam worth 10% of the total A2 qualification. Students must complete a booklet of assessed homework and a test at the end of each topic within a module. This specification is divided into a total of 5 modules, 2 at AS, 2 at A2 and one practical assessment sat in Year 13

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Basic Biochemistry and Cell Organisation; and AS Unit 2 Biodiversity and Physiology of Body Systems. A Level: A2 Unit 3 Energy, Homeostasis and the Environment; A2 Unit 4 Variation, Inheritance and an Option; and BY5 is the Practical Assessment.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: The A level Biology qualification is necessary for those wishing to study medicine; veterinary science; nursing; dentistry; physiotherapy; podiatry; dietetics; and other medical careers. It is also taken by those intending to follow careers in pharmacy; optics; psychology; forensic science; scientific journalism; biotechnology; and a range of laboratory research work. There are an increasing number of careers involving environmental management and conservation and a wide range of courses in biological sciences (eg. Zoology; plant science; genetics; molecular biology; biotechnology; microbiology and environmental biology) in universities. Biology selected alongside Chemistry; Physics; Maths; Psychology; or Geography can open up a broad range of university options.

Email contact: emeryk@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Business Studies

This course introduces students to the dynamic business environment and the importance of entrepreneurial activity in creating business opportunities and sustaining business growth. The focus is to nurture an enthusiasm for studying business using contemporary contexts, enabling them to develop an appreciation of the strategic, complex and inter-related nature of business issues from a local to global perspective.

Students will gain a breadth of knowledge across a variety of areas including Marketing; Accounting and Finance; People in Organisations; Operations Management; The External Environment; and Objectives and Strategy. They will focus on different types of organisations in various environments and familiarise themselves with current issues in business and the UK economy. These will be examined at a local, regional, national and international level. Students will explore, apply and evaluate business concepts and theories through critical consideration of current issues, problems and institutions that affect everyday life. Through their studies, they will be able to make justifiable decisions and offer solutions to such problems using both quantitative and qualitative methods, taking into account opportunity cost.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: The course provides a foundation for further study of the subject and is suitable for students intending to pursue careers or further studies in the areas of business, management, marketing, logistics, social sciences, accountancy and finance. Some students have also combined elements of design, fashion and art with business/management.

Former students have gone on to study at a range of highly regarded institutions including LSE, Warwick, Kings College, Manchester and Bristol. Some of our recent alumni have graduated with 1st class Honours from universities such as Exeter and Cardiff. Career destinations include Goldman Sachs, Ocado and Deloitte.

Email contact: jenkinse@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Chemistry

The AS course comprises two modules while the A2 course comprises a further three modules covering aspects of theoretical and practical chemistry. The course extends many of the topics introduced at GCSE. For example, the structure of the atom is studied in more depth. It allows students to access many other areas of study including how materials behave as explained by the bonding exhibited.

A greater understanding of the chemical industries, including pharmaceutical and petrochemical industries, is developed to show the industrial relevance of the subject. The chemistry of amino acids and proteins illustrates the biological relevance and the environmental chemistry topic shows the impact of chemicals on our everyday lives.

AS Level: Unit 1 The Language of Chemistry, Structure of Matter and Simple Reactions; and Unit 2 Energy, Rate and Chemistry of Carbon Compounds. There is no practical assessment at AS Level but students are expected to complete designated practical work from the specification.

A Level: Unit 3 Physical and Inorganic Chemistry; Unit 4 Organic Chemistry and Analysis; and Unit 5 Practical coursework. Examination set by the WJEC on a designated day.

To broaden and support the course, students are encouraged to make use of the opportunities available in the department and in Cardiff. These include the use of a growing chemistry library on the science concourse; and membership of 'Cardiff Scientific Society'.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: Chemistry is a subject of global impact which has a profound effect on our planet and is involved in nearly every facet of everyday life. Chemistry A Level is an essential entrance requirement for many careers and courses. For example, agricultural science; chemical engineering; veterinary medicine; pharmacology; biochemistry; dentistry; chemistry; medicine; metallurgy; pharmacy; laboratory technician; science journalism; biological sciences; environmental sciences; nursing; and water technology.

Email contact: emeryk@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Drama

The course comprises two areas of study. The first is a theory element that requires students to study one set text and to respond to a live theatrical performance. The second is a practical element requiring them to perform a devised piece of theatre adapted from an extract of a text. At A2 Level a further two set texts are studied in depth. In terms of the practical work, a scripted and a devised piece are created in the style of a practitioner in response to a stimulus provided by the exam board.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Theatre Workshop - Students either act in a group or contribute a chosen technical production skill to a performance reinterpreting a set text into an adaptation. They will work on the ideas of a practitioner. A creative log and evaluation will be required. AS Unit 2 Text in Theatre - Written paper open text exam. A series of questions based on one performance text studied. Students will be required to analyse how they would perform and stage an extract of the play, detailing their influences from live productions.

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Text in Action - Students work in response to a stimulus set by the WJEC and prepare two performances. In each case they will either act or demonstrate a technical production skill with a group of performers. The performance will include, scenes/extracts from a published text and a piece devised by the group. Both performances must be produced in contrasting styles of practitioners/recognised theatre companies. An evaluation of performance work for both pieces will be required. A2 Unit 4 Text in Performance - Two questions on two different set texts from a prescribed list. This is an 'open-text' examination where students will be asked to discuss the plays as a whole.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: The qualification is an excellent basis for those who wish to study literature, drama or performing arts through higher education. It will provide an excellent foundation for those who aspire to have a career in the media, theatre, broadcasting or the Arts in general. It will furnish students with many skills that translate well into the employment market and foster excellent communication and team work skills that many employers would regard as desirable.

Email contact: lloydf@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Economics

Economics is central to society and students may already be aware of economic issues such as the Eurozone crisis; the US government shutdown; increasing youth unemployment; the rise of university fees; and the funding for life-saving drugs on the NHS which have economic concepts at their heart.

This is a subject with analysis at its core. Very often solutions to our questions are not simply black or white and as a result, there is a great deal of discussion and personal opinion involved. Economists are people who are able to assess situations, draw conclusions and make recommendations based on information provided to them. Scientists and mathematicians are often attracted to Economics because of the logical reasoning associated with the subject, together with the behavioural element that makes the subject so unique.

AS Level: Microeconomics - At AS, students study the basic economic problem and the concepts of demand and supply together with elasticity and how they can impact on a market. They will investigate how and why markets might fail and what solutions governments can offer. Macroeconomics - At AS, this begins with an overview into national income. Students examine aggregate demand and aggregate supply, and investigate how changes in either of these can impact on our economy and employment/output/inflation. They will study the Government’s four macroeconomic objectives and how monetary and fiscal policy can be used to affect the economy.

A Level: Microeconomics - At A2, students study the costs, revenues and profits a firm may face. They will examine the different economic models of competition and how these can lead to different outcomes for the market, the current competition policy (including privatisation) and the impact this may have on efficiency, price and consumer choice. Macroeconomics - At A2, students will examine the key macroeconomic issues affecting our economy and study institutions such as the EU, and the Euro and how they may benefit or disadvantage our economy. Finally, they will look at economic development, including the barriers to development countries may face and the policies that can support their development.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: Many students go on to pursue an Economics or joint honours degree, combining Economics with History, Philosophy and Politics. Former students have gone on to study at a range of highly regarded institutions including LSE, Bristol, Manchester and Warwick. Such a degree can lead to careers in banking; the civil service (specialising in agriculture or transport); insurance; and wider finance/business sectors. In addition, economists are sought after in areas such as the media; crime; charities; and think tanks. Some of our alumni have gone on to work for Citibank and Goldman Sachs.

Email contact: jenkinse@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level English Language & Literature

This is a mentally active and challenging course; there will be no dictated notes to learn, but the direct engagement with the set texts and the motivation to write creatively in specific genres will be of importance. Students take responsibility for their own learning. A seminar approach is most common in class teaching and thoughtful student contribution is very beneficial They will acquire and understand linguistic vocabulary and learn to apply the terminology to the analysis of texts, including their own.

The AS and A2 GCE in English Language and Literature, introduced in 2015, is based on a conviction that the study of literature and the ability to write creatively can be enhanced by a systematic knowledge of language.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Comparative Analysis and Creative Writing (closed book). The study of poetry anthology/creative writing and commentary (2 hour examination). AS Unit 2 Drama and Non-Literary Text Study (open book, clean copy). Tennessee Williams – A Streetcar Named Desire (Penguin Modern Classics) and Truman Capote – In Cold Blood (Penguin Modern Classics) (2 hour examination).

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Shakespeare - A study of Antony and Cleopatra (closed book) (2 hour examination); A2 Unit 4 Unseen Texts and Prose Study (open book). A study of Thomas Hardy – Tess of the D’Urbervilles (Penguin Classics) (2 hour examination). A2 Unit 5 Critical and Creative Genre Study. Non-exam assessment; 2500-3500 word folder.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: English A Level is clearly an important step towards studying the subject at university. Its analytical and evaluative procedures of close reading and logical argument are also valued as good training for a variety of other courses at university, including law, journalism and humanities. Past A Level students have even gone on to study medicine and science subjects - English's reasoning requirements and demand for articulate expression being regarded as important here too. Finally, its cultural dimension, in the sense of giving an insight into how people and societies have acted and expressed themselves in different historical periods, is unique and is thought highly of in many walks of life.

Email contact: dodwellc@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level English Literature

This is a mentally active and challenging course; there will be no dictated notes to learn, but the direct engagement with the set texts and the motivation to undertake directed and undirected private reading are of prime importance. Students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning. A seminar approach is most common in class teaching and thoughtful contribution is very important. They will acquire and understand technical vocabulary, increase their general vocabulary and develop their personal written style. The WJEC AS and Advanced GCE in English Literature is based on a conviction that the study of Literature should encourage enjoyment of literary studies based on an informed personal response to a range of texts.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Prose and Drama (2 hour examination). Prose fiction pre-1900, questions based on Charlotte Brontë, Jayne Eyre (Penguin Classics); Drama questions based on Christopher Marlowe – Doctor Faustus (Longman). AS Unit 2 Poetry Post-1900 (2 hour examination). Critical analysis of one poem from D H Lawrence; Selected Poems (Penguin Classics edited by James Fenton); Gillian Clarke, Making the Beds for the Dead (Carcanet); and comparison of two poems from prescribed text.

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Poetry Pre-1900 and Unseen Poetry (2 hour examination). Question in two parts based on reading of one poetry text from John Donne, Selected Poems (Penguin Classics) and Comparative analysis of two unseen poems. A2 Unit 4 Shakespeare (2 hour examination). One question on Shakespeare set play extract and an essay question based on reading of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. A2 Unit 5 Prose Study. Non-examination assessment reading 2500-3500 words.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: English A Level is clearly an important step towards studying the subject at university. Its analytical and evaluative procedures of close reading and logical argument are also valued as good training for a variety of other courses at university, including law, journalism and humanities. Past A Level students have even gone on to study medicine and science subjects - English's reasoning requirements and demand for articulate expression being regarded as important here too. Finally, its cultural dimension, in the sense of giving an insight into how people and societies have acted and expressed themselves in different historical periods, is unique and is thought highly of in many walks of life.

Email contact: dodwellc@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level French

The course provides students with the opportunity to develop communication, listening, reading and writing skills in French, to promote knowledge of the language and culture. As well as enabling students to acquire skills and understanding for practical use, further study or employment. There is also provision for a weekly conversation class (in small groups) with the French assistant(e) to help you develop spoken French further. Information is given about a specialist work experience firm which arranges placements abroad, and several AS students have completed rewarding placements in recent years.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Speaking - An oral test lasting 12-15 minutes covering two tasks – arguing a point of view based on a written stimulus card, and a discussion based on a second written stimulus card. AS Unit 2 Listening, Reading, Translation from French into English (38 marks). Critical Response in French (36 marks) – a closed-book written paper where students answer one essay question in 300 words in French on the study of one film from a prescribed list (2 hours 15 minutes)

A Level: A2 Unit 4 Speaking - An oral test lasting 11-12 minutes where candidates present an independent research project (2 minutes), to be followed by a discussion (9-10 minutes). A2 Unit 5 Listening, Reading, Translation from English into French. A written paper (105 minutes). A2 Unit 6 Critical and analytical response. A closed-book written paper where candidates answer one essay question of 300 words in French on the study of one literary work from a prescribed list (90 minutes).

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: A qualification in a Modern Foreign Language is increasingly seen as a valuable asset by many universities, colleges and employers, as it reflects a student's linguistic, communication and organisational skills. UK businesses are desperately seeking those with competence in a language other than English. The Russell Group of Britain's top universities has very sound advice on which subjects to choose if students wish to pursue courses and subsequent careers.

Email contact: penacqv@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Geography

The course provides students with an in-depth understanding of both the human and physical landscapes in future contexts. Application of key skills, problem solving and decision making also form a key part of both the AS and A2 modules.

AS Level: AS consists of two units - Unit 1 Changing Landscapes; Investigating Changing Landscapes (coastal landscapes) and investigating Tectonic hazards. Written examination 2 hours (A Level 24%). Unit 2 Changing Places. Investigating Changing Places. Fieldwork Investigations in Human and Physical Geography. Written examination 1 hour 30 minutes (A Level 16%)

A Level: A2 consists of three units of study - Unit 3 Global Systems and Global Governance; Investigating Global Systems (water and carbon cycles), investigating Global Governance (change and challenges with oceans and global migration), and investigating 21st Century Challenges. Written examination 2 hours (A Level 24%). Unit 4 Contemporary Themes - Investigating tectonic hazards, energy and the development of India. Written examination 2 hours (A Level 16%). Unit 5 Independent Investigation. Non-examination assessment 3000-4000 words (A Level 20%) which is an independent write up based on fieldwork.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: This course encourages students to apply geographical knowledge, theory and skills to the world around them. They will develop a critical understanding of the world’s people, places and environments in the 21st Century and develop their knowledge and understanding of contemporary geographical concepts. These transferable skills will enable them to progress to higher education and a range of employment opportunities. There are rapidly growing fields of study now at the forefront of work done locally, nationally and globally. It is likely that the sectors of employment that deal with managing change in the physical and human environment will grow most rapidly in the coming years. The specification provides an ideal foundation for the study of geography, earth sciences, environmental and ecology studies, global politics and town planning as well as other related areas. This may be accessed via higher education courses, vocational qualifications or directly into employment.

Email contact: evansl@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Health & Social Care, and Child Care

The study of Health and Social Care should by its nature contribute to candidates’ understanding of spiritual, moral, ethical, social, legislative, economic and cultural issues; including taking responsibility for one’s own actions. It also encourages candidates to understand and discuss the decisions that may influence Health and Social Care policies and the subsequent effect on the well-being of the population and the provision of support in the community. In order to understand the nature of Health and Social Care, learning is applied to a range of work-related contexts. This can be achieved through a variety of approaches including work experience, links with local employers, case studies and research.

The qualification serves to provide a broad educational basis for further education or for moving into employment within the Health and Social Care Sector; builds upon the broad educational framework supplied by the Qualification and Subject Criteria; and provides a suitable route for progression for candidates completing GCSE Health and Social Care.

AS Level: AS Unit 1: Promoting health and well-being Written examination: 2 hours 20% of qualification. AS Unit 2: Supporting health, well-being and resilience in Wales. Non-exam assessment: approximately 30 hours 20% of qualification.

A Level: Childcare focus - A2 Unit 3: Theoretical perspectives of children and young people's development Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes 30% of qualification. A2 Unit 4: Supporting the development, health, well-being and resilience of children and young people Non-exam assessment: approximately 40 hours 30% of qualification Adult focus: A2 Unit 5: Theoretical perspectives of adult behaviour Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes 30% of qualification. A2 Unit 6: Supporting adults to maintain health, well-being and resilience Non-exam assessment: approximately 40 hours 30% of qualification.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: Social worker, care in the community practitioner, occupational therapist, dietician, paediatric nursing, health promotion specialist, nursery assistant.

Email contact: patersong@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level History

The ‘Period Study’ element at AS Level provides an opportunity to study developments in the history of Europe between 1890 and 1991. The ‘Depth Study’ will allow students to study, in depth, a range of historical topics and problems relating to the period of reform and protest in Wales and England c.1783-1832. At A2 Level, students will extend their understanding of the depth study examined at AS Level. In addition, the ‘Breadth Study’ will enable them to consider aspects of history from a long-term perspective. The non-examined assessment component will allow them to evaluate contrasting historical interpretations on a specific individual, event or change.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Period Study ‘Europe in an age of conflict and co-operation, c.1890-1991’. Written examination; 1 hour 30 minutes; 20% of overall qualification (50% at AS) AS Unit 2 Depth Study Part 1 ‘Radicalism and the fight for parliamentary reform c.1783-1832’ Written examination; 1 hour 45 minutes; 20% of overall qualification (50% at AS).

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Breadth Study ‘The American century c.1890-1990’. Written examination; 1 hour 45 minutes; 20% of qualification. A2 Unit 4 Depth Study Part 2 ‘Protest and the campaign for social reform c.1832-1848’. Written examination; 1 hour 45 minutes; 20% of qualification. A2 Unit 5 ‘Historical Interpretations’. Non-Examined Assessment (NEA); 20% of qualification. This component encourages students to explain how and why different historical interpretations have been formed. They choose a focus area from a choice of three.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: History can not only lead to a career in teaching but also in law; politics; journalism; the Civil Service; television; and banking. As ‘The History Benchmarking Draft Report’ states, “Important abilities and qualities of mind are acquired through the study of history. They are particularly valuable for the graduate as they are readily transferable to many occupations and careers”.

Email contact: hartb@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

Level 3 BTEC ICT

BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate (Equivalent to 1 A Level)

This qualification gives students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills in IT systems, systems management and social media in business to enable them to progress to further study in the IT sector or other sectors.

The BTEC approach to learning, through projects, practical assignments, group work and through simulating the world of work, has always supported the development of employability skills, such as self-management. In the new Nationals the balance of cognitive and work skills has been carefully calibrated to ensure that students get a range of different opportunities across their course.

The course includes the following: Unit 1 Information Technology Systems (synoptic); Unit 2 Creating Systems to Manage Information; Unit 3 Using Social Media in Business; and Unit 5 Data Modelling.

Progression Routes & Career Opportunities: When taken alongside other Level 3 qualifications, including BTEC Higher Nationals or A Levels in complementary or contrasting subjects, such as mathematics, physics, science, arts or technology, the qualification gives students the opportunity to progress to a degree in an information technology discipline or a degree where information technology related skills and knowledge may be advantageous.

This qualification carries UCAS points and is recognised by higher education providers as meeting admission requirements to many relevant courses. Students can choose their optional units from a wide range so that they can explore their own choice of areas for further study. For example, the qualification supports entry to HND in Business, BA (Hons) in Computer Arts, BSc (Hons) in Fashion Buying Management, BSc (Hons) in Software Development for Animation, BA (Hons) in Accounting and Finance.

The qualification, when studied with other Level 3 qualifications, is aimed at progression to higher education but also enables students to develop knowledge and skills needed for entry-level roles related to IT, including vocational apprenticeship roles and trainee/entry-level roles such as a social media specialist, web/content developer, or business analyst.

Email contact: huntn@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Mathematics

This popular course encourages students to develop an understanding of coherence and progression in mathematics and how different areas of mathematics can be connected. They will develop skills enabling them to recognise how a situation may be presented mathematically and to understand the relationship between 'real world' problems and other mathematical models and how these can be refined and improved. In so doing it will develop the use of mathematics as an effective means of communication and extend the range of mathematical skills and techniques used in more difficult, unstructured problems. It also provides a complete course in mathematics for those who do not wish to proceed further in the subject but require it for other science-based career choices.

Mathematics is, inherently, a sequential subject. There is a progression of material through all levels at which the subject is studied. The content of AS Mathematics therefore builds upon the knowledge, understanding and skills established in studying GCSE Mathematics (Higher Tier). The course is broadly split into Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics (combining Statistics and Mechanics). Pure Mathematics involves algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus. Mechanics deals with motion and forces, whilst Statistics involves probability and discrete and continuous distributions.

AS Level: Unit 1 Pure Mathematics (one examination of 2 hours 30 minutes); and Unit 2 Applied Mathematics (one examination of 1 hour 45 minutes).

A Level: Unit 3 Pure Mathematics (one examination of 2 hours 30 minutes); and Unit 4 Applied Mathematics (one examination of 1 hour 45 minutes).

Use of a calculator is allowed in every examination, however there is a strong emphasis on the importance of full written methods. Examinations can only be taken during the summer session at the end of an academic year.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: An A level in Mathematics will provide an essential and firm foundation for those who wish to proceed to further mathematical study or to employment. Careers include accountancy and professional service; the actuarial profession; retail and investment banking; computing and IT; engineering sciences; statistical research; and teaching. It can also be financially rewarding to study Mathematics – studies have shown that graduates and non-graduates who complete a Mathematics A Level can earn on average 10 per cent more than those of similar ability and background who do not.

Email contact: jonesg@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Further Mathematics

This is for the more able student as the pace is extremely demanding (with an aim of covering the equivalent of a full A Level in Mathematics in Year 12). The sequential nature of the subject means that the progression to Further Mathematics AS and/or A Level then follows in Year 13. Over two years, two complete A Level courses are covered. In Year 13, students can opt to cover only the first three out of five modules of Further Mathematics, leading to an AS qualification; this would be in addition to the full A Level in Mathematics already covered in Year 12.

Please note that Further Mathematics can only be selected in addition to Mathematics.

Year 12 (equivalent to completing one A Level in Mathematics) - ‘Further Mathematics’ lessons in Year 12 cover the content of the A2 ‘Mathematics course’ (normally covered by Year 13 ‘single’ maths students), comprised of Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics (Statistics and Mechanics) and involving two examination papers (in addition to the two papers for ‘single’ mathematics AS). Year 13 (equivalent to either an AS Level or one full A level in Further Mathematics)

AS Level: Further Mathematics consists of three modules - Unit 1 on Further Pure Mathematics; (one examination, 1 hour 30 minutes); Unit 2 on Further Statistics; (one examination, 1 hour 30 minutes) and Unit 3 on Further Mechanics (one examination, 1 hour 30 minutes).

A Level: Further Mathematics will consist of two units - Unit 4 on Further Pure Mathematics (one examination of 2 hours 30 minutes); and Unit 5 on Further Statistics OR Unit 6 on Further Mechanics (one examination of 1 hour 45 minutes).

Examinations can only be taken during the summer session at the end of an academic year.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: An AS or A Level in Further Mathematics will provide an excellent route for a continuation of further mathematical study at university as the level of mathematics covered is beyond the scope of the single mathematics course at A level. It is also frequently requested as a desired component for university entry into various courses leading to career pathways which include science, engineering and finance. The studying of Further Mathematics can result in a university offering a lower grade combination for entry.

Email contact: jonesg@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Media Studies

WJEC Media Studies specification is designed to allow students to draw on their existing experience of the media and to develop their abilities to respond critically to a wide range of visual or audio texts. It enables students to explore a wide variety of media, including digital media technologies, drawing on the fundamental concepts informing the study of the media, texts, industry and audiences.

The specification also encourages creative work to enable students to gain a greater appreciation of the media through their own production work and to develop their own production skills. At A2 in particular, students are given the opportunity to research a topic which will then form the basis for their production, thus encouraging them to create productions informed by an awareness of contemporary media issues.

AS Level: Unit 1 Investigating the Media - Written examination; 2 hours 15 minutes; 24% of the qualification. This unit assesses knowledge and understanding of media language, representation, media industries and audiences. AS Unit 2 Creating a Media Production. Non-exam assessment; 16% of the qualification. A media production including individual research and planning, created in response to a choice of briefs set by the WJEC, and applying knowledge and understanding of key concepts.

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Media in the Global Age - Written examination; 2 hours 30 minutes; 36% of the qualification. This unit assesses knowledge and understanding of media language, representation, media industries and audiences. A2 Unit 4 Creating a Cross-Media Production - Non-examination assessment; 24% of the qualification. A cross media production including investigative research and development created in response to a choice of briefs set by the WJEC, and applying knowledge and understanding of key concepts and digital convergence.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: The course is a great introduction for a career in the media or creative studies. It develops analytical skills and will support the study of English at university level. A qualification in Media Studies is increasingly seen as a valuable asset by many universities and employers as it reflects a student’s linguistic and communication skills.

Email contact: dodwellc@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Music

Music integrates the three components of performing, composing and appraising through the study of various musical traditions.

AS Level Music: Performing Practical Examination (12%) - A performance consisting of two pieces (minimum) either as a soloist or as part of an ensemble or a combination of both. Composing Course Work - Two compositions (12%) - A piece of at least 1 minute duration which uses the techniques associated with the Western Classical Tradition and be in response to a brief set by WJEC; and a free composition of at least 2 minutes duration. Appraising Examination Two areas of study (16%) - Area of study A, The Western Classical Tradition; Either The Symphony 1760-1830 including one set work or Choral Music 1730-1800 including one set work; area of study B, One from Rock and Pop 1965-1990; area of study C, Musical Theatre; area of study D, Jazz 1935-1960.

A Level Music: Performing Option A - a performance consisting of a minimum of three pieces (22%); or Option B, a performance consisting of a minimum of two pieces (14%). Composing Coursework Option A - Composing two compositions (14%). A piece of at least 1 minute duration which uses the techniques associated with the Western Classical Tradition and be in response to a brief set by WJEC or a free composition of at least 2 minutes duration; or Option B composing three compositions (22%). A piece of at least 1 minute duration which uses the techniques associated with the Western Classical Tradition and be in response to a brief set by WJEC or a free composition reflecting one different area of study of at least 2 minutes duration or a free composition. Appraising Examination two areas of study (24%) - Area of study E The Western Classical Tradition. The Symphony 1830-1910 including one set work or Choral Music 1800-1880 including one set work; Area of study F Post 1900. List A, either Strand 1 Impressionism or Strand 2 Twenty-first century Chamber Music in Wales; List B, either Strand 3 American Popular Songs of the 20s and 30s or Strand 4 Popular Music in Wales. Set works will be included in each strand.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: The course provides the basis to proceed to higher education to study Music and Music Technology. It is essential grounding for those who wish to work as performers, composers, music broadcasters or in arts administration. It shows a student’s ability to perform under pressure, work with others and perform to a high standard. Career opportunities include performing artist, sound technicians, radio and television.

Email contact: lloydf@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Physical Education

The course covers an extensive range of analytical skills from an interesting variety of subject areas. The assessment tasks make provision for students to further develop their literacy, oracy and practical performance skills whilst following lesson content that will appeal to their interests in sport or physical activity. A diverse range of future opportunities will be accessible to them should they choose to continue into higher education and they will be afforded the opportunity to develop the essential skills required to be successful not only in this subject but those with which it has close ties.

AS Level: Unit 1 Exploring Physical Education - Written examination (1 hour 45 minutes); 24% of qualification. Question types will include multiple choice, data response, short and extended answers. AS Unit 2 Improving Personal Performance in Physical Education Practical performance; 16% of qualification. In one activity as a player/performer; practical performance as a coach; personal performance profile coursework.

A Level: Unit 3 Evaluating Physical Education - Written examination (2 hours); 36% of the qualification. A range of questions to include data response, short and extended answers. A2 Unit 4 Refining Personal Performance in Physical EducationPractical performance; 24% of the qualification. One activity as a player/performer, coach or official. Investigative research.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities:

This qualification provides an essential grounding for students who wish to study Sport or Physical Education at university. There is now an increasingly wide range of courses that allows them to continue with this subject in higher education, including sports science, coaching, education and many others related to management or sports development. However, this course is not limited to gaining entry into sports specific courses. Many past students have gained access to courses in medicine, psychology and physiotherapy through following this course.

Email contact: potterr@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Physics

This course provides students with a broad and balanced understanding of how we are able to exist on earth today. Topics covered will analyse the existence of particles smaller than an atom, to the components of light received from galaxies millions of light years away. It encourages students to explain physical phenomena using mathematical concepts so consequently there is a 40% mathematical content. It is not essential to study A Level Mathematics, although there are areas where the courses overlap. It is important to note that those planning to study Physics at university will require Mathematics A Level.

A practical exam taken in Year 13 is worth 10% of the qualification. Students will be required to keep an up to date lab book showing all of the experimental tasks, analysis and evaluations carried out over the two year course. Topics such as particle physics, radiation from stars, planetary motion and medical physics have proved particularly popular with students due to their interesting and stimulating nature. If you have a curious, questioning mind with an enthusiasm for finding out how the universe is in existence then AS/A Level Physics could be the course for you!

AS Level: Unit 1 Motion, Energy and Matter; and Unit 2 Electricity and Light.

A Level: Unit 3 Oscillations and Nuclei; Unit 4 Fields and an Optional Unit; and Unit 5 Practical Examination.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: Physics is still the fundamental science and as such its study opens up many opportunities in today's technological world. Physics students are always in demand whether going straight into the work place or on to further studies in a wide variety of subject areas. Finance; engineering; and law are just a few careers that see Physics as an advantage. There are also many opportunities to study exciting courses such as astronomy; medical physics; physics with music; theoretical physics; and physics with a year abroad.

Email contact: emeryk@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Product Design

This course offers a unique opportunity in the curriculum for students to identify and solve real problems by designing and making products or systems. Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. The specification encourages students to use creativity and imagination when applying interactive design processes to develop and modify designs, and to design and make prototypes that solve real world problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants, aspirations and values.

The specification enables students to identify market needs and opportunities for new products, initiate and develop design solutions and make and test prototypes. Students should acquire subject knowledge in design and technology, including how a product can be developed through the stages of prototyping, realisation and commercial manufacture. Students should consider small and large commercial/manufacturing contexts and gain an insight into design and technology activity in the creative industries.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Written paper; 2 hours (20% of the qualification); AS Unit 2 Design and Make Task NEA; 40 hours approximately (20% of the qualification);

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Written paper; 2 hours 30 minutes (30% of the qualification); and A2 Unit 4 Design and Make Project Non- examination Assessment; 60 hours approximately (30% of the qualification).

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: Product design, industrial design, interior design, architecture, mechanical engineering, fashion illustration, project management, product research and development, graphic design, CAD engineer.

Email contact: patersong@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of behaviour. The specification has been designed to provide a broad introduction to the scope and nature of psychology as a science. The emphasis is on applying knowledge and understanding rather than just acquiring knowledge. Psychology develops students’ transferable skills of analysis, evaluation and critical thinking.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Psychology Past to Present - Written examination; 1 hour 30 minutes; 20% of qualification. Compulsory questions relating to five psychological approaches, therapies and classic pieces of research evidence. AS Unit 2 Using Psychological Concepts - Written examination; 1 hour 30 minutes; 20% of qualification. Section A Contemporary debates in Psychology. Section B The Principles of Research. Section C The Application of Research.

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Psychology Implications in the Real World - Written examination; 2 hours 30 minutes; 40% of qualification. Section A The Study of Behaviours. Three structured essays from a choice of six. Section B Controversies. One question from a choice of two requiring a synoptic exploration of psychological controversies. A2 Unit 4 Psychology Applied Research Methods - Written examination; 1 hour 30 minutes; 20% of qualification. Section A Personal Investigation. One compulsory question based on an investigative activity carried out prior to the assessment. Section B Novel Scenarios. Compulsory questions requiring a response to a piece of research.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: Psychology is relevant to a number of different career options including market research; advertising; social work; teaching; nursing; the police service; and personnel management. Professional psychologists also work in a variety of fields including industry, education, sport and the NHS.

Email contact: kaidl@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Religious Studies

Society has become so multi-cultural that issues of religion and ethics are always headline news. What people believe and how they behave has thus become a fascinating area for study. For this reason, RS as a qualification is valued by employers and universities alike. Indeed, as one blue-chip company has recently told its recruitment teams; "when employing staff look out for students of Religious Studies - they are usually very solid, reliable individuals who, alongside good logical skills, are often highly people-orientated". The subject is ideal for you if you are keen to learn more about religion, ethics and morality. Opt to study this subject with us and you will join the many thousands of students in the UK who can see the advantages of taking a subject that will teach you the skills of critical thinking, textual analysis, evaluation and cultural understanding.

AS Level: Unit 1 An Introduction to the Study of Buddhism - Written Examination; 1 hour 15 mins (worth 15% of qualification). This unit explores the events in the life of the Buddha, the religious scriptures used by Buddhists and the concepts they contain, including the nature of life and rebirth. Unit 2 An Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics - Written Examination; 1 hour 45 mins (worth 25% of qualification). This unit explores philosophical questions surrounding the existence of God and the origins of evil and suffering. Students develop their understanding of ethical theories including Natural Law, Situation Ethics and Utilitarianism and will apply these to contemporary issues. For example, abortion, euthanasia, IVF, war etc.

A Level: Unit 3 The Study of Buddhism - Written Examination; 1 hour 30 mins (20% of qualification). This unit explores the diversity of Buddhist views including those of Mahayana Buddhism, Zen Buddhism and Pure Land Buddhism. The unit also includes an in-depth study into the Mindfulness Movement happening across Western society. Unit 4 Religion and Ethics - Written Examination; 1 hour 30 mins (20% of qualification). This unit provides students with an opportunity to undertake an in-depth study of ethics and allow them to assess how ethical decisions are made. Unit 5 Religion and Philosophy - Written Examination; 1 hour 30 mins (20% of total qualification). This unit allows students to explore and assess notions of ‘faith’ and ‘belief’, considering the origins and reliability of such concepts. They will also gain an understanding of religious experience and undertake an in-depth study of a range of case studies on these experiences e.g. miracles, near death experiences etc.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: The course is ideal for students pursuing law, medicine, social services, the police force and teaching, as well as those planning to study philosophy, ethics or religion at a higher level. In addition RS provides a stimulating background to the study of history and literature. The teaching of this subject is interactive in style and students become deeply involved in their own learning.

Email contact: jonese@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Sociology

Subject Information

All units require the student to demonstrate essential skills developed through their study of sociology; ie. the ability to show their knowledge and understanding of key concepts and issues in the context of sociological theory and methodology. They are also expected to select, interpret, apply and evaluate their knowledge and understanding in a range of theoretical and practical contexts.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Acquiring Culture - Written examination; 1 hour 15 minutes; 15% of the qualification. Section A One structured question on the key concepts and processes of cultural transmission, socialisation and the acquisition of identity. Section B Consists of families and households module that involves compulsory questions and a choice between two essay questions. AS Unit 2 Understanding Society and Methods of Sociological Enquiry - Written examination; 2 hours; 25% of the qualification. Section A Methods of Sociological Enquiry. One compulsory question based on stimulus material. Section B Understanding Society. This section will be based upon Education. There will be compulsory questions based on data response and a choice between two essay questions.

A Level: A2 Unit 3 Power and Control - Written examination; 2 hours; 25% of the qualification. This section will be based upon crime and deviance. It includes compulsory questions and a choice between two essay questions. A2 Unit 4 Social Inequality and Methods of Sociological Enquiry - Written examination; 2 hours 15 minutes; 35% of the qualification. Section A Applied Methods of Sociological Enquiry. One compulsory question which will require students to design, justify and evaluate a piece of sociological research. Section B Social Inequality. Questions in this section are on the theme of social differentiation and stratification. These will include a compulsory question and a choice between two essay questions.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: This specification provides a suitable foundation for the study of Sociology or a related area through a range of higher education courses (including criminology, administration or law; progression to the next level of vocational qualifications (such as social work or nursing); or direct entry into employment.

Email contact: kaidl@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Spanish

Student Experiences

Brief Description: The course provides students with the opportunity to develop communication, listening, reading and writing skills in Spanish, to promote knowledge of the language and culture. In addition, it enables students to acquire skills and understanding for practical use, further study or employment. There is also provision for a weekly conversation class (in small groups) with the Spanish assistant(e).

AS Level: Unit 1 - Speaking - An oracy test lasting 12-15 minutes covering two tasks - arguing a point of view, and a discussion. Unit 2 - Listening, Reading Writing - Translation task from Spanish into English, Critical response in Spanish based on a prescribed film.

A2 Level: Unit 3 - Speaking - An oracy task where candidates present an independent research project and a subsequent discussion. Unit 4 - Listening, Reading, Translation - Written Paper. Unit 5 - Critical and Analytical Response - A written paper where candidates answer one essay question on the study of one literary work from a prescribed list.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities:

Email contact: penacqv@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

Level 3 BTEC Sports Studies

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport (Equivalent to 1 A Level)

Brief Description

The BTEC Sport Level 3 course includes both theory and practical sport. It will develop students’ sporting knowledge and their practical ability by covering Unit 1; anatomy and physiology; Unit 2; Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well-being; Unit 3; Professional Development in the Sports Industry and then a final fourth unit from Sports Leadership, Application of Fitness Testing, Sports Psychology or Practical Sports Performance.

4 Units are taught over the 2 years, with 3 Mandatory Units 1-3) and 1 optional. 2 of the mandatory units are externally assessed (Unit 1 & 2).

This course particularly suits those wanting a more practical style of sports course and those who may be aspiring to continue on to higher education or enter employment in sports coaching, sports development and sports management. It provides students with frequent opportunities to develop a range of techniques, personal skills and attributes essential for successful performance in working life.

Course Summary

Two out of the four units are assessed through assignments in a variety of formats; these include written reports, posters, practical sports, demonstrations, group tasks, interviews, practical coaching, presentations and student produced videos, work experience, projects, performance observation and time-constrained assessments.

Unit 1 and 2 are assessed through externally assessed examinations. Unit 1 has a variety of multiple choice, short and longer response answers.

Unit 2 has 2 tasks: Task A being a case study on which you have 4 hours to make notes, Task B – further case study information and set tasks based around analysing the information (your notes from Task A are allowed into the assessment).

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities

The BTEC National Extended Certificate qualification provides an essential grounding for those students who wish to study sport or physical education at university. It provides opportunities for sport, leisure and recreation employment through gaining a nationally recognised Level 3 vocationally specific qualification.

Email contact: potterr@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

A Level Welsh (Second Language)

During the first stage of the AS Level students will study elements of Welsh media, literature and language in addition to developing oral, creative and critical writing skills. They will study a ‘set’ Welsh film for the media element and a series of Welsh poems for the literature element nurturing their ability to explore and voice their appreciation of these elements. At A2 Level, students will further their study of Welsh literature with the introduction of a Welsh play and a series of Welsh short stories. The course will develop their key skills of communication, IT skills, and ability to work with others, all of which are essential to the study of Welsh.

AS Level: AS Unit 1 Film and Oracy, Oral examination (15% of the qualification). Section A Discussing the film studied (20 mins per group). Section B Personal response to the film studied (5 mins per candidate). AS Unit 2 Non-examination assessment (10% of the qualification). Production of 3 extended written tasks (1,500 – 2,000 words). AS Unit 3 Writing Examination (15% of the qualification). Examination paper 2 hours. Section A Language; dealing with a selection of language exercises. Section B Poetry; a question based on the set poetry texts.

A Level: A2 Unit 4 Drama and Oracy, Oral examination (25% of the qualification). Section A Living through Welsh. Section B Discussing the drama studied (30 mins per group). Section C Personal response (5 mins per candidate); Synoptic response. A2 Unit 5 Welsh in Society & Translanguaging (2 hours); Written examination paper (15% of the qualification). Section A Welsh in Society; Structured questions based on a set text. Section B Translanguaging; Written response in Welsh to an English article; Synoptic response. A2 Unit 6 Use of the Language & The Short Story (2 hours); Written examination paper (20% of the qualification). Section A Language; a variety of language exercises. Section B A structured question based on one of the set texts. Synoptic response, 1 question linking knowledge/understanding and the skills developed in the subject.

Progression Routes & Career Opportunities: The AS and A2 Welsh Second Language are recognised qualifications with universities within the UK in line with other languages. Career opportunities are to be found in public services in Wales such as teaching, local government, media and journalism. With the Welsh Assembly Government's increasing emphasis on developing bilingualism in Wales, developing Welsh Language skills as far as is possible is advantageous.

Email contact: morganr@bishopofllandaff.org

Student Experiences

Welsh Baccalaureate - Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate

Brief Description: Students will take part in four challenges across the two years in the Sixth Form, with these challenges helping to develop skills which both employers and further education establishments value. The challenges will also support students’ other subjects and enable students to be better prepared for their future destination.

Course Summary: Global Citizenship Challenge, Community Challenge, Enterprise and Employability and Individual Project.

Progression Routes and Career Opportunities: The skills challenge certificate is recognised by many employers and universities within the UK. It provides the opportunity to develop skills which are essential for both employment and future study such as literacy, numeracy, digital literacy, planning and organisation, critical thinking, creativity and innovation and finally personal effectiveness. Many universities now include the Advanced SCC in their UCAS offers.

Email contact: huballd@bishopofllandaff.org

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