Daisy Bates FAPRONIA WASIF

Bates was a civil rights activist, journalists, author, and was NAACP leader during the Little Rock desegregation crisis of 1957.
Daisy Bates was born in a tiny hut in southern Arkansas on November 11,1914. Her mom was killed and her dad left town. She stayed with her friends parents.
In the famous fight for integration at Central High school began in 1955, bates began involved when the NAACP informed her that their were failed attemptes integrating the schools in the city.
Her husband had launched a newspaper called the Arkansas State Press and she had joined him working on it. This newspaper mainly focused on the improvments needed for the colored race.
On November 4, 1999, Bates died from a heart attack. she was buried in Haven Of Rest Cemetery in her home town Little Rock.
Bates was elected the president of the Arkansas Confrence of Branches. Her and her husband worked as much as they could to fund segregated programs for racial integration.
Daisy Lee Gatson was born on November 11,1914 in Hittig, Arkansas. Her mom was sexually assuluted and was murded by three white men and was murdered hen Daisy was young.
Even though bates didn't have any children, she had much respect and cared for the children who were troubled.

Works Cited

"American National Biography Online: Bates, Daisy." American National Biography Online: Bates, Daisy. N.p., 2010. Web. 30 Mar. 2017.

"Daisy Bates." Biography.com. A&E Networks Television, 02 Apr. 2014. Web. 30 Mar. 2017.

"Daisy Lee Gatson Bates." Daisy Lee Gatson Bates (1913?–1999) - Encyclopedia of Arkansas. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.

Jones, Peter Carr. "Daisy Bates." The American Mosaic: The African American Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2017, Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

"Log in." Britannica School. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc, n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.

Notes:

2. Daisy Bates' background

Quotes: Bates was born Daisy Lee Gatson in tiny Hut in southern Arkansas on November 11, 1914. She grew up with friends of her parents after her mother was killed by whites and her father fled town. This background inspired Bates to fight for racial equality throughout her life.

Paraphrasing: Daisy Bates was born in a tiny hut in southern Arkansas on november 11,1914. Her mom was killed and her dad left town. She stayed with her friends parents.

Source: Jones, Peter Carr. "Daisy Bates." The American Mosaic: The African American Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2017, Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

4. Arkansas State Press

Quotes: In 1942 she joined her husband on the weekly newspaper he had launched the previous year, the Arkansas State Press. The newspaper focused on the need for social and economic improvements for the black residents of the state and became known for its fearless reporting of acts of police brutality against black soldiers from a nearby army camp.

Paraphrasing: Her husband had launched a newspaper called the Arkansas State Press and she had joined him working on it. This newspaper mainly focused on the improvments needed for the colored race.

Source: "Log in." Britannica School. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc, n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.

1. Who is Daisy Bates and what did she do?

Quotes: Daisy Bates was an African American civil rights activist, journalist, author, and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) leader during the Little Rock desegregation crisis of 1957.

Paraphrasing: Bates was a civil rights activist, jounalists, author, and was NAACP leader during the Little Rock desegregation crisis of 1957.

Source: Jones, Peter Carr. "Daisy Bates." The American Mosaic: The African American Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2017, Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

5. Her last days

Quotes: In ill health the last years of her life, Bates died of a heart attack on November 4, 1999, at Baptist Medical Center in Little Rock. She is buried in Haven of Rest Cemetery in Little Rock.

Paraphrasing: On November 4, 1999, Bates died from a heart attack. she was buried in Haven Of Rest Cemetery in her home town Little Rock

Source: "Daisy Lee Gatson Bates." Daisy Lee Gatson Bates (1913?–1999) - Encyclopedia of Arkansas. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.

6. President of Arkansas Conference Of Branches

Quotes: 1952, she was elected president of the Arkansas Conference of Branches, the umbrella organization for the state NAACP. She and her husband worked closely with other members of the Little Rock branch as the national strategy of the NAACP shifted in the 1950s from advocating a position of equal funding for segregated programs to outright racial integration.

Paraphrasing: Bates was elected the president of the Arkansas Confrence of Branches. Her and her husband worked as much as they could to fund segregated programs for racial integration.

Source: "Daisy Lee Gatson Bates." Daisy Lee Gatson Bates (1913?–1999) - Encyclopedia of Arkansas. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.

3. What did she fight for?

Quotes: Bates's involvement in the famous fight for integration at Central High School began in 1955 when the NAACP sent her to photograph and record the failed attempts of local African American children to integrate white schools in the city. President of the state conference of NAACP branches since 1952, she readily agreed to the assignment.

Paraphrasing: In the famous fight for integration at Central High school began in 1955, bates began involved when the NAACP informed her that their were failed attemptes integrating the schools in the city.

Source: Jones, Peter Carr. "Daisy Bates." The American Mosaic: The African American Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2017, Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

7. A break in her early life

Quotes: Civil rights activist, writer, publisher. Born Daisy Lee Gatson on November 11, 1914, in Huttig, Arkansas. Bates's childhood was marked by tragedy. Her mother was sexually assaulted and murdered by three white men and her father left her.

Paraphrasing: Daisy Lee Gatson was born on November 11,1914 in Hittig, Arkansas. Her mom was sexually assuluted and was murded by three white men

Source: "Daisy Bates." Biography.com. A&E Networks Television, 02 Apr. 2014. Web. 30 Mar. 2017.

8. How did she help the youth

Quotes: Bates and L.C. endured the usual terrors exacted on civil rights activists in the Deep South: hate mail, death threats, vandalism, arrests, firebomb scares. Although they never produced sons or daughters of their own, Bates doted on children, and she and L.C. frequently acted as caregivers for impoverished or troubled youth.

Paraphrasing: Even though bates didn't have any children, she had much respect and cared for the children who were troubled.

Source: "American National Biography Online: Bates, Daisy." American National Biography Online: Bates, Daisy. N.p., 2010. Web. 30 Mar. 2017.

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