plants evolvment by: mo

Plant reproductive system

any of the systems, sexual or asexual, by which plants reproduce. In plants, as in animals, the end result of reproduction is the continuation of a given species, and the ability to reproduce is, therefore, rather conservative, or given to only moderate change, during evolution. Changes have occurred, however, and the pattern is demonstrable through a survey of plant groups.

Reproduction in plants is either asexual or sexual. Asexual reproduction in plants involves a variety of widely disparate methods for producing new plants identical in every respect to the parent. Sexual reproduction, on the other hand, depends on a complex series of basic cellular events, involving chromosomes and their genes, that take place within an elaborate sexual apparatus evolved precisely for the development of new plants in some respects different from the two parents that played a role in their production. (For an account of the common details of asexual and sexual reproduction and the evolutionary significance of the two methods, see reproduction.

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Created with images by Alexas_Fotos - "lavender bottle plant" • esiul - "plant nature live" • MNoe - "flower nature plant"

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