Loading

NHS Long Term Plan views from experts at sheffield hallam university

Earlier this week the Government launched a 10-year plan for the NHS, setting out how the £20.5 billion budget settlement will be spent over the next 5 years.

Key priorities for this plan include:

  • Reducing stillbirths and mother and child deaths during birth by 50%
  • Preventing up to 150,000 heart attacks, strokes and dementia cases over the next 10 years
  • Spending at least £2.3bn more a year on mental health care, including increased funding for children and young people’s mental health
  • Saving 55,000 more lives a year by diagnosing more cancers early and improving outcomes for children and young people

Here's what some of our experts have to say.

Reducing stillbirths and mother and child deaths during birth by 50%

“The Government's effort to reduce health inequalities for mothers and their babies is long-awaited. Our research has shown there's a higher risk of extremely preterm birth, extremely low birthweight and perinatal mortality for adolescent mothers. Similarly we have shown that BAME and migrant mothers suffer more complications and negative experiences during pregnancy and birth.

These women need culturally-competent, compassionate health professionals who listen to them and provide respectful, dignified and equitable perinatal care, undergirded by multidisciplinary team-working and a continuity of care. It is also paramount to bear in mind the importance of the needs of pregnant mothers, particularly those from vulnerable groups, that go beyond clinical care and require more holistic, psychosocial approaches.

Hora Soltani, Professor of maternal and infant health

Preventing up to 150,000 heart attacks, strokes and dementia cases over the next 10 years

“I am pleased to see cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is explicitly named as a priority. The Government has set an ambitious target of 85% of patients accessing CR by 2028. This is more than a 30% jump, however to be effective, we need to be ambitious. CR is for everyone who has had a heart problem, regardless of physical ability. It improves quality of life and helps people return to the activities that are important to them. It adds life to years. However, CR deals with a problem once it has occurred. Whilst this is important, the government's CVD primary prevention strategy is of equal importance. Detecting high blood pressure and/or other cardiometabolic risk factors early on will prevent premature morbidity and mortality.”

Dr Simon Nichols, Research fellow in exercise physiology and scientific officer at the British Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (BACPR)

Spending at least £2.3bn more a year on mental health care, including increased funding for children and young people’s mental health

"The long-term plan represents vital progress for mental health services. We’ve been developing early interventions and mental health initiatives for young people which have been constrained by lack of budget and have not been as comprehensive as they needed to be. This new funding announced by the Government should allow for a more joined-up, public health approach when caring for children and young people's mental health, going some way further towards providing them with the right care within the right facilities at the right time."

Dr James Turner, Professional lead in mental health nursing

Saving 55,000 more lives a year by diagnosing more cancers early and improving outcomes for children and young people

“Accelerated diagnosis and treatment for cancers is a positive and welcome ambition; it is claimed this will be supported with appropriate equipment investment (CT scanners and MRI scanners etc) and the current radiotherapy equipment replacement programme will be completed. This ambition also needs a substantial increase in key specialist staff. There is a shortage of radiographers and it will be interesting to see how the shortfall will be met.

Greater choice and more personalised medicine will see a fundamental shift towards person-centred care, engaging patients in meaningful conversations about their own care and creating genuine, valuable partnerships between clinicians and patients.”

Heidi Probst, Professor of radiotherapy and oncology

Sheffield Hallam University is a national leader in creating innovative and real-world solutions for tackling today's health and wellbeing challenges.

The University is the largest provider of health and social care education in England. With courses covering all aspects of healthcare including: nursing, midwifery, allied health, social care and sport, its curriculum creates the skilled workforce the NHS needs to deliver better long-term health outcomes for the nation.

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a copyright violation, please follow the DMCA section in the Terms of Use.