Baseball Everything you need to know

Baseball is a classic ball game played in spring to fall all over America. Since baseball is such a great sport, you should learn the rules so you can play with your friends. Continue reading to learn about batting, fielding, teams, and many more.

Teams

American League:

Boston Red Sox

New York Yankees

Toronto Blue Jays

Baltimore Orioles

Oakland Athletics

Cleveland Indians

Chicago White Sox

Texas Rangers

Tampa Bay Rays

Detroit Tigers

Seattle Mariners

Kansas City Royals

Houston Astros

Minnesota Twins

Los Angeles Angels

National League:

Chicago Cubs

Milwaukee Brewers

Washington Nationals

Miami Marlins

Los Angeles Dodgers

New York Mets

San Francisco Giants

San Diego Padres

Arizona Diamondbacks

St. Louis Cardinals

Colorado Rockies

Cincinnati Reds Philadelphia Phillies Atlanta Braves Pittsburgh Pirates

Diagram

Batting

First, you will need a baseball bat, baseball helmet (instead of cap when batting), and might want to consider baseball gloves so your hands don’t hurt when you hit the ball. If you score it is called a run.

Now we will talk about hitting. (See batter’s box in diagram.) When you bat, you need to know about the strike zone. The strike zone’s height is usually about the distance from your knees to your chest, and as wide as home plate. When you are batting and the ball is pitched outside of there, you should not swing because it is a bad pitch. It is called a ball. However, if you swing at anything and miss it (even if it’s not in the strike zone) it is a strike. And if it is in the strike zone and you don’t swing, it is still a strike. When you are next to bat, it is called being on-deck.

In order to get out, you need to have three strikes (three outs equals next inning. In an inning, both teams get to bat and field once.). In order to walk (free walk to first base) you need four balls. When somebody walks, the the runners on base only advance a base if it is a force play. That is when you have to run since you can only have one person per base. Here is a rule called drop three strike: If the catcher (learn more info. about later) drops strike three, then the batter has a chance to run to first base and still be safe.

When you hit the ball, if you make it to first base, it’s a single. Then double, triple, and homerun! A home run is when you hit the ball and run around all the bases until you get all the way back to home

plate (white pentagon in diagram.) But, there are few names for a home run. Usually a home run is hit out of the in the stands, but if it is still in the field it is an inside home run. If you hit one when nobody else is on base it is a solo home run. If one person is on base, it is a two run home run. Then a three run home run. And if bases are loaded (runner at every base) it is a grand slam. One more thing, if you hit the ball in the foul line, it is called a foul. A foul can be strikes one and two, but not three.

Another thing that is similar to a home run is a ground roll double. That is when the ball bounces over the fence. If that happens, every runner advances two bases.

Fielding

Fielding:

There are a lot of things to know about fielding. First, I will tell you about the positions.

Pitcher (P)

Catcher (C)

First Baseman (1B)

Second Baseman (2B)

Third Baseman (3B)

Shortstop (SS)

Out Field (OF)

Designated Hitter (DH)

If you read what is in parentheses, that is what it will say on a baseball card. The pitcher (stands at pitcher’s mound) is one of the hardest positions to play. You already know some things about the pitcher, but not everything. There is a rule about pitching called bocking. When the pitcher gets ready to pitch the ball, it is called a windup. If the pitcher goes into the windup but then pretends to actually pitch the ball, then it is bocking. When this happens, all the runners advance a base (not including batter).

Catcher (kneels behind plate) is another hard position to play. If the batter doesn’t hit the ball, then the catcher is the person who catches it. Then they throw it back to the pitcher. An important rule related to the catcher is stealing. You can really steal anytime you want, but the two most common and smart times are either when the catcher misses the ball or when the catcher throws the ball over his head. That is when a runner (not batter) would run to the next base when nobody has hit the ball yet. Also, if you were wondering what the coach’s box is on the diagram, that is where the coaches (or other players) can stand to tell a runner to steal. If the batter is in the middle of batting and somebody steals and gets the third out, then next inning the same batter would be up with a count of 0-0.

Now we will talk about the other infield positions; 1B, 2B, 3B, and SS. Now, it’s obvious where 1B, 2B, and 3B stand, but shortstop stands write in between second and third base. We will talk about most of the outs they make. If a ball isn’t hit too far, then usually the infield will get it and throw to one of the bases to get a runner out. If it is a force play, all you have to do is throw the ball and beat the runner to the base to get them out. However, if it is not a force play, you must tag the runner out.

Now, moving on to outfield. There are three positions; center field, right field, and left field. When it says right, left, and center, that is the perspective for the batter. So say you were playing right field, you would stand your left of the field. Also, it is also the same perspective as on the diagram. An out that those positions usually make are if the ball is hit in the air and it hasn’t touched the ground yet, they can catch it and the person who hit it would be out. I the other runners had already started running, then they have to run back.

Not much to say about designated hitter, besides that they only bat, and don't field.

Fielding:

There are a lot of things to know about fielding. First, I will tell you about the positions.

Pitcher (P)

Catcher (C)

First Baseman (1B)

Second Baseman (2B)

Third Baseman (3B)

Shortstop (SS)

Out Field (OF)

Designated Hitter (DH)

If you read what is in parentheses, that is what it will say on a baseball card. The pitcher (stands at pitcher’s mound) is one of the hardest positions to play. You already know some things about the pitcher, but not everything. There is a rule about pitching called bocking. When the pitcher gets ready to pitch the ball, it is called a windup. If the pitcher goes into the windup but then pretends to actually pitch the ball, then it is bocking. When this happens, all the runners advance a base (not including batter).

Catcher (kneels behind plate) is another hard position to play. If the batter doesn’t hit the ball, then the catcher is the person who catches it. Then they throw it back to the pitcher. An important rule related to the catcher is stealing. You can really steal anytime you want, but the two most common and smart times are either when the catcher misses the ball or when the catcher throws the ball over his head. That is when a runner (not batter) would run to the next base when nobody has hit the ball yet. Also, if you were wondering what the coach’s box is on the diagram, that is where the coaches (or other players) can stand to tell a runner to steal. If the batter is in the middle of batting and somebody steals and gets the third out, then next inning the same batter would be up with a count of 0-0.

Now we will talk about the other infield positions; 1B, 2B, 3B, and SS. Now, it’s obvious where 1B, 2B, and 3B stand, but shortstop stands write in between second and third base. We will talk about most of the outs they make. If a ball isn’t hit too far, then usually the infield will get it and throw to one of the bases to get a runner out. If it is a force play, all you have to do is throw the ball and beat the runner to the base to get them out. However, if it is not a force play, you must tag the runner out.

Now, moving on to outfield. There are three positions; center field, right field, and left field. When it says right, left, and center, that is the perspective for the batter. So say you were playing right field, you would stand your left of the field. Also, it is also the same perspective as on the diagram. An out that those positions usually make are if the ball is hit in the air and it hasn’t touched the ground yet, they can catch it and the person who hit it would be out. I the other runners had already started running, then they have to run back.

Not much to say about designated hitter, besides that they only bat.

Fun Fact:

A fun fact is that in american league, the pitcher does not bat, but in national league, the pitcher does.

There are so many fun things about baseball. Even if it is cold weather you can still go to an indoor baseball practice place. There might be a few things you might not understand, but once you know most of the rules it’s easy to learn the others. Hope you enjoyed this rule book.

Credits:

Created with images by Pexels - "baseball sports field stadium" • delusionalcubsfan - "Chicago Cubs Schedule 2009" • JeepersMedia - "Pop tarts printed fun Baseball Team logo printed Pop Tarts Major League Baseball. Pics by Mike Mozart of TheToyChannel and JeepersMedia on YouTube. #PopTarts #PopTartsBaseball #PopTartsPrintedFun #MajorLeagueBaseball" • Yiie - "Baseball" • Tiger Girl - "Target Field"

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