Baron Andolph de Meyer FREYA MACDONALD 1B NC PHOTOGRAPHY

WHO ARE THEY?

Baron Adolph de Meyer was born on the 1 September 1868 (would have been turning 149 this year!) and spent the majority of his childhood in France and Germany. He exhibited his photography when he was 26. The following year, 1896, he moved to London and by 1899 his photography earned him a membership in the Linked Ring, a society of Pictorialist Photographers and also joined the Royal Photographic Society. He maintained a relationship with Alfred Stieglitz who was also a photographer and published a magazine (Camera Work) in which de Meyers' work figured in. He died in 1946 in Los Angeles.

WHAT ARE THEY KNOWN FOR?

Baron Adolph de Meyer is known for becoming the first official photographer for the American magazine Vogue in 1914. In 1921 he left the worldwide known company to work for Harper's Bazaar where he became the fashion photographer. He brought a dreamy, beautifully lit, flattering style to the business as the photographs normally produced for fashion photography looked awkward and stiff. He photographer many famous people from his time such as Marilyn Miller, Ann Pennington and Irene Castle.

Vogue, September 1920

WHAT PROCESS ARE THEY KNOWN FOR?

Adolph de Meyer is also known for the style of Pictorialism. This is the name given to an international style and aesthetic movement that took over photography during the later 19th and 20th centuries. An image created in this style appears out of focus and is printed in warm browns, black and white and the image may also have visible brush strokes on the surface. Commonly used processes to created a pictorial style are; Bromoil process, Carbon print, Oil print process and Platinum print.

THE CAMERA AND EQUIPMENT

To create this style of photography a soft focus lens is required but the result of the final image depended on the control of the printing process of the image. A variety of papers and chemical processes were used to create certain effects and sometimes the image was manipulated by brush strokes or ink.

EXAMPLES OF THE FINISHED PHOTOS

SHORT VIDEO THAT EXPLAINS THE PROCESS

HOW YOU CAN EMULATE THE PROCESS

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