Man Ray's Story

Man Ray (born Emmanuel Radnitzky; August 27, 1890 – November 18, 1976) was an American visual artist who spent most of his career in France.
He produced major works in a variety of media but considered himself a painter above all. He was best known for his photography, and he was a renowned fashion and portrait photographer. Man Ray is also noted for his work with photograms, which he called "rayographs" in reference to himself.
Man Ray was primarily known for his photography, which spanned both the Dadaism and Surrealism movements.
His experiments with photography included rediscovering how to make “cameraless” pictures, or photograms, which he called rayographs. He made them by placing objects directly on light-sensitive paper, which he exposed to light and developed.
Man Ray experimented with the technique called solarization, which renders part of a photographic image negative and part positive by exposing a print or negative to a flash of light during development.
Man Ray also made films. In one short film, Le Retour à la raison (1923; Return to Reason), he applied the rayograph technique to motion-picture film, making patterns with salt, pepper, tacks, and pins.
''My cameras are all of my own design. I take lenses apart and put them together again and put them on cameras that were not meant for them." Man Ray said.
In the mid 1920s, Man Ray's work, influenced by Marcel Duchamp
I like him because his work is very innovative, very artistic. Besides, he is really good at using light and shadow, and his photography has a kind of unique temperament attracting me.

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