Jaffna Fort 😀 ~Sivanandam Kirushan~

The early 17th Century Jaffna Fort was built by the Portuguese, expanded by the Dutch, and destroyed by human aggression. Visit the ruins - a testament to architectural prowess and sheer brutality.
Entrance of Jaffna Fort that was originally built by the Portuguese and renovated by the Dutch on 1680.
Unfortunately, the Fort that stood in pristine condition for some 350 years was reduced to rubble during the civil conflict.
Fresh after the civil war, the Dutch Government pledged to archaeologically renovate the Fort.
According to Archaeology Daily, a whole host of historically important artifacts were found from various regions and eras.
The historicity of Jaffna and its residual evidence is exemplified by the existence of the Dutch Fort and the host of other archaeological monuments associated with it, though they are seen to the present day as ruins.
These buildings have been destroyed during the 30 year old internal strife that ravaged the country.

These buildings have been destroyed during the 30 year old internal strife that ravaged the country.

Within the fort stand significant buildings of architectural importance. The church erected in 1706, within the walled enclosure was one of the most impressive architectural works of the northern region. This building, which lacks significant ornamentation, showed how effective a buildings architecture could be, if proportions (both exterior as well as interior), and massing of volumes are correctly achieved.
Both the inner and outer defences of the Fort were built in a Vauban star design - a geometrically perfect set of pentagons within each other. This was a a star fort concept that was popularized during mid 15th century Italy, when gunpowder/cannons were invented and protuberant bastions became necessary. An antique blue print of the Fort's design was found which details its features perfectly.

The short parapet wall constructed to the style of Dutch architecture in front of this building has by and large been spared of destruction.

Its broad walls had been constructed in limestone by Netherlands government.

The Jaffna Fort and the buildings that had come up during the occupation of the island by the Portuguese, Dutch and the British shows the architectural features relevant to those periods of construction. These buildings have been destroyed during the 30 year old internal strife that ravaged the country.
The monuments within the fort had been destroyed during the conflict that raged in the area. Of these the monument named the Queen’s Palace is in sufficient level of preservation than the rest as it could be identified. Its superstructure is completely destroyed and the remaining walls are in the process of being destroyed due to the presence of invasive plants having taken roots in them.
With walls some 3 feet in width, buildings like that were built to last, but not built to bear bombs and heavy artillery. The civil war claimed this historical marvel, leaving huge chunks of the heavy limestone walls embedded in the earth. When you draw close, you realise the intense force that had to be used to destroy such heavy, substantial material. It's chilling.

Close to the boundary of the seaside rampart are a well believed to have been constructed during the Dutch era and a Hindu temple built at a later date.

Its superstructure is completely destroyed and the remaining walls are in the process of being destroyed due to the presence of invasive plants having taken roots in them.

Jaffna fort with such heritage values of national and international significance was in a perfect state of preservation until the country’s civil war that erupted in the mid 1980’s. The fortifications and buildings within it were severely damaged due to artillery fire. The Church is now reduced to a heap of rubble.
It's pretty deserted these days, with maybe a few school children on tour or stragglers about. The no entry on foot signs at some areas is a bit unnerving, but probably best followed!

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