Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening A poem by robert frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village though;

He will not see me stopping here

To watch his woods fill up with snow.

-

My little horse must think it queer

To stop without a farmhouse near

Between the woods and frozen lake

The darkest evening of the year.

-

He gives his harness bells a shake

To ask if there is some mistake.

The only other sound’s the sweep

Of easy wind and downy flake.

-

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,

But I have promises to keep,

And miles to go before I sleep,

And miles to go before I sleep.

This poem is about a man exploring and enjoying his sorroundings. The man is aware that he still has a long ways to go before he reaches his destination, however, he is savoring the journey.

Whose woods these are I think I know.

Notice the unique wording here. This is a way of enticing you to read this poem, you will encounter this tactic through out this poem and in many others too.

His house is in the village though;

He will not see me stopping here

Although this poem is not intended as a thriller, by stating that some one will not see him, it adds mystery.

To watch his woods fill up with snow.

In this line there is figurative language, a hyperbole to be exact. The woods will not literally fill up with snow, they will instead have a lot of snow in them.

My little horse must think it queer

To stop without a farmhouse near

The author is trying to put an image in your mind. Right here, instead of describing what is there, he is describing what isn't there.

Between the woods and frozen lake

The darkest evening of the year.

In this line, not only is he describing the light out, he is describing the mood; gloomy.

He gives his harness bells a shake

To ask if there is some mistake.

The only other sound’s the sweep

Of easy wind and downy flake.

Instead of saying "it's snowing", he describes a snow flake flying down, to make his literature more interesting.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,

But I have promises to keep,

And miles to go before I sleep,

And miles to go before I sleep.

The author uses repitition here, to give the poem rhythm and to get a point through.

After reading this text, you may realize that it told a story, therefore naming itself a narative poem.

Credits:

Created with images by 8moments - "cross country skiing forest snow" • jossuppy - "Snowy Woods" • rreihm - "the farmer" • sebilden - "Barn" • Mark Bonica - "Walden Pond" • SteveWisco - "Winter Woods"

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