Representation of advertising by luna

How does an advertising agency work?

  1. Advertising Agencies Have Clients: what is the purpose of a pitch in the agency/client relationship?A pitch is an audition, with the client giving a brief to a number of advertising agencies, and choosing the one that best resolves the brief. Of course, it doesn’t always work that way (see The Pitch TV show), but for the most part, this is how agencies are paired with clients.
  2. Everything is Problem/Solution Driven: Explain who has the problem and who comes up with a solution in the context of the agency/client relationship?
  3. The Process of Creating Advertising Campaigns: Create a flowchart to represent the process involving the client, the account manager, the creative team and the creative director.

#Sheobjects

questions

  1. What is the problem that this campaign is seeking to address?To spotlight the portrayal of women in the media as objects and the correlation between this and: a) body image and self-esteem issues for women and girls; b) violence and harrassment against women, and c) a lack of ambition to aspire to leadership roles on the part of women
  2. How is the organisation trying to do this?
  3. How are the various films part of a wider campaign?

Advertising Standards & Censorship

most complained about ads of 2015

  • 1. Moneysupermarket.com 1,513 complaints – Not upheld
  • A TV and internet ad featured a man walking down a street and dancing whilst wearing denim shorts and high heeled shoes. We received complaints that the ad was offensive. some viewers might have found the ad distasteful.
  • 2.Paypal (UK) 464 complaints – Not upheld
  • Two children in Paypal’s Christmas ad which appeared on TV and parents hadn’t been shopping for Christmas Presents. Complaints expressed concern that the ad revealed the truth about santa
  • 3. Omega Pharma Ltd 136 complaints – Upheld (this figure relates to 2015 complaints only, more complaints were received in 2016)
  • A TV, YouTube and VOD ad for XLS Medical, a slimming aid, featured two women exchanging text messages before heading on holiday. After seeing a photo of her friend who had lost weight, the other woman in the ad was unhappy about not being able to fit into her holiday wardrobe. We banned the ad because it presented an irresponsible approach to body image and confidence.

why were these films banned

  1. this film was bad because it was too scary, the part that was the most scary was the part where the kid was chained up. The trailer said that 'there is no escape ', and there was a scene where there were hanging legs making it seem like the boy had committed suicided
  2. this advert was ban because if the use of alcohol, this is met for a school that is why this trailer was banned

Advertising Regulation task;

  • 1.Identify the groups of people who appear to be most vulnerable to advertising. That is, who are the regulators trying to protect?.Advertising regulation refers to the laws and rules defining the ways in which products can be advertised in a particular region. Rules can define a wide number of different aspects, such as placement, timing, and content. In the United States, false advertising and health-related ads are regulated the most. Two of the most highly regulated forms of advertising are tobacco advertising and alcohol advertising
  • 2.Adverts for which products are most strictly regulated? Why do you think this is? there are adverts that are more strictly regulated because they are unhealthy or because something might not be true. Adverts are not aloud to lie to the consumer.
  • 3.In a group, discuss whether you think adverts need to be regulated. What harm might they do (if any)? i think that adverts should be regulated because if not then there will be a lot of adverts shown that could be offensive and inappropriate also they could state things that are untrue making it a lie; like telling people that some thing is healthy when it is not.
  • Create your own set of regulations - about 10 rules which you think should apply to advertisers.
  • 1.on kids tv no unrelated advertising to kids things
  • 2.no racists adverts
  • 3. all adverts must be censored
  • 4. no harm to animals
  • 5. no misleading adverts = no adverts that are lying
  • 6. no unnecessary violence in adverts
  • 7. no death related adverts
  • 8. adverts should not offend (Advertisers should think about how their ads could be perceived)
  • 9.Claims should be supported with evidence
  • Look at these (controversial) ads from the clothing company Benetton. Would they pass your set of regulations? Would you ban them? Be prepared to explain why or why not. no because most of the Benetton adds have death related ads an have inappropriate content, but the message is not pitiful
  • question 1: these images are advertising cigarets and chocolate.
  • question 2: chocolate:makes you thin and has less fat cigaret: helps your throat.

Abercrombie & Fitch Case Study

The Caucasian, almost Aryan look of health and vitality, which forms the subject and focus of the image is contrasted with the blurred image of the American flag, seen in the background. he brand identity of Abercrombie and Fitch was promoted by CEO Mike Jeffries who told Salon:

“It’s almost everything. That’s why we hire good-looking people in our stores. Because good-looking people attract other good-looking people, and we want to market to cool, good-looking people. We don’t market to anyone other than that...Are we exclusionary? Absolutely. Those companies that are in trouble are trying to target everybody: young, old, fat, skinny. But then you become totally vanilla. You don’t alienate anybody, but you don’t excite anybody, either.”

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