Project 3 By hunter heskett

Scope of this project: We aimed at creating 3 products, that we designed, through a choice of 4 different machines. I chose to use the Makerbot Replicator, the SRM-20, and the Versalaser 4.60.

What is DFM: DFM means designing for manufacturing. This basically means that the designer/engineer of the products design has to know what the part's manufacturing constraints are. How tall, wide and deep it can be is the just the start of the DFM process and can lead to more in depth questions which mostly revolve around the capabilities of the machines being used.

SRM 20- The SRM 20 uses a revolving bit to cut away material from the base material in order to bring out a 3D model. It also employs a g-code software to map out the movements of the drill bit. By taking away material to get a finished product, this machine is using the subtractive manufacturing technique. A great example of DFM on this machine is the fact that this machine can only cut down, and cant cut through the base material unless you flip it over or design it to have a base you can remove to have the finished product.

Makerbot Replicator- The replicator heats the tip of its extruding nozzle and moves through the X, Y and Z axis to print layers of material on top of the last. It uses g-code software to map out where, how fast, and when the machine moves. By adding material to get a finished product, this machine is using the additive manufacturing technique. A good example of DFM on this machine is the constraints that it has, if we didn't pay attention to them we could have used much more material than we should've.

Versalaser- The CO2 laser, after its movements are mapped out in a g-code software generator, runs over the 1/8 inch material (plastic and wood but not metal) and cuts it with high precision and accuracy. Compared to the other machines, this one is the most accurate machine in the lab, but also the most expensive. By cutting away material to get a finished product (albeit a small amount), this machine uses the subtractive manufacturing technique. A prime example of DFM on this machine is the fact that the material can only be 1/8 inch thick to cut, we can use this knowledge and work around it by cutting out multiple pieces and assembling them together so that there is a full 3D model at the end.

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