Hemophilia A By: Katie Sprague

Sources:

The data contained in this brochure has been gathered through world-renown and credible sources including, "Hemophilia A." National Hemophilia Foundation. N.p., 15 July 2015. Web. 05 Apr. 2017., "Hemophilia." Mayo Clinic. N.p., 26 Sept. 2014. Web. 05 Apr. 2017., and 2011, December. World Federation of Hemophilia Report on the ANNUAL GLOBAL SURVEY 2010Report on the Annual Global Survey 2010 Is Published by the World Federation of Hemophilia. (n.d.): n. pag. Web.

What is hemophilia A?

- a disorder where blood doesn't clot normally because the body lacks certain proteins.

- because of this disorder, blood doesn't mesh together to make a clot to stop bleeding.

- can be either inherited or a genetic mutation.

Sources: "Hemophilia A." National Hemophilia Foundation. N.p., 15 July 2015. Web. 05 Apr. 2017., "Hemophilia." Mayo Clinic. N.p., 26 Sept. 2014. Web. 05 Apr. 2017.

What are symptoms of hemophilia A?

- excessive bleeding: nosebleeds, large, deep bruises, easy bruising, small cuts and bleeding profusely, as well as...

- headaches

- extreme vomiting

- double vision

Source: "Hemophilia." Mayo Clinic. N.p., 26 Sept. 2014. Web. 05 Apr. 2017.

Who is mostly affected?

- males under 40

- this disease is rare, and as of now there are fewer than 200,000 cases in the United States each year.

- females can have hemophilia A as well, but are less likely.

- since daughters have two X chromosomes, one from each parent, they have more of a chance of inheriting healthy chromosomes.

- men cannot pass down hemophilia, only females can.

The graph above shows the proportion of male and female patients for all bleeding disorders. Notice that men are disproportionately shown to have more of a likelihood of having hemophilia. Source: 2011, December. World Federation of Hemophilia Report on the ANNUAL GLOBAL SURVEY 2010Report on the Annual Global Survey 2010 Is Published by the World Federation of Hemophilia. (n.d.): n. pag. Web.

Sources: "Hemophilia." Mayo Clinic. N.p., 26 Sept. 2014. Web. 05 Apr. 2017., "Hemophilia A." National Hemophilia Foundation. N.p., 15 July 2015. Web. 05 Apr. 2017.

Being Diagnosed:

- should first and foremost be treated at a hospital that specializes in hemphilia, Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC).

- facilities provide physical therapists, social workers, nurses and doctors that are strictly hematologists.

- doctors will most likely conduct a clotting factor test, or assay, which will reveal the severity and type of hemophilia you have.

- there are 3 kinds of hemophilia, hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and hemophilia C.

Source: "Hemophilia A." National Hemophilia Foundation. N.p., 15 July 2015. Web. 05 Apr. 2017.

How can you help yourself?

- exercise: will help you build muscle to protect joints (no contact sports)

- protect against injuries that will cause bleeding: for example, wear knee/elbow pads, and helmets for riding a bike and clear your home of sharp edges.

- practice good dental hygien to prevent tooth extraction and from that, excessive bleeding.

Source: "Hemophilia." Mayo Clinic. N.p., 26 Sept. 2014. Web. 05 Apr. 2017.

Treatment Options:

- the medicine most often used to treat hemophilia A is called a "clotting factor".

- this kind of treatment is developed in a lab using DNA.

- the medicine will be injected using a needle into a vein or sometimes the chest.

- patients with severe hemophilia A have daily treatments put into their body to prevent them from bleeding too much.

- patients with the mild form of hemophilia, can take medicine that stops the bleeding in the mucous membranes (like nosebleeds) and helps with surgery before and after to avoid over-bleeding problems. This medicine can be conveniently put into a nasal spray or injected.

- the "clotting factor" is recommended by the Medical and Scientific Advisory Council (MASAC) to enable the blood to form clots, ceasing constant bleed-outs.

- the Advisory Council also recommends patients use what is called aminocaproic acid, to preserve the clot and keep it from liquifying or "being broken down prematurely".

Source: "Hemophilia A." National Hemophilia Foundation. N.p., 15 July 2015. Web. 05 Apr. 2017.

Credits:

Created with images by dxiri - "Human_Blood_Cells_by_fine_ass_tramps"

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