ARROWHEAD CENTER Newsletter

A Note from the Director

It has been an exciting month for Arrowhead Center at New Mexico State University. Our fourth annual Launch proof of concept program technology competition, which invests in early-stage NMSU research with the potential for large commercial and social impacts, ended with the selection of an exceptional engineering project with applications as wide-reaching as space travel to health care.

Our annual Innoventure competition brought 125 middle and high school students from across the state to NMSU’s campus to present inventions made entirely of recycled materials and business plans associated with those inventions. Innoventure sponsor Wells Fargo announced their commitment to continued financial support of the program, helping to ensure that New Mexico’s youngest entrepreneurs will continue to receive the education and encouragement they need. Innoventure and Studio G, our NMSU student and alumni business incubator, are also benefitting from a generous grant from the Daniels Fund, which will provide funding for the programs through early 2017.

We saw the official groundbreaking in Arrowhead Park of the Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine, an institution that will both create much-needed jobs in the region and improve quality of life for residents by training the next generation of health care professionals.

Finally, I would like to extend my personal thanks to Arrowhead student team: the undergraduate and graduate students who helped make this another incredible semester. Many will be returning this summer and fall, while others are moving on to new adventures across the nation, from Sandia National Laboratories to the StartFast Venture Accelerator in Syracuse, NY to Sun Mountain Capital in Santa Fe, to NASA. My thanks and congratulations to each of you for your hard work and bright futures.

Kathy Hansen

Director and CEO of Arrowhead Center

ARROWHEAD CENTER’S LAUNCH PROGRAM SELECTS 2015 SEED-FUNDING WINNER

Date: 05/01/2015

Writer: Amanda Bradford, 575-646-1996, ambradfo@nmsu.edu

Technology that could improve orientation control for spacecraft is the latest commercialization project to receive seed funding through the Launch program at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center.

The adaptive singularity-free control moment gyroscope technology was developed by Amit Sanyal, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NMSU, along with doctoral candidate Sasi Prabhakaran. Engineering master’s student Taylor Burgett, a client of Arrowhead’s student incubator, Studio G, is working to commercialize the technology for use in cube satellites.

Control moment gyroscopes are internal momentum-exchange devices that are used to control the orientation of a rigid body in space. Comprised of novel hardware and software architectures, the gyroscope technology provides precise attitude control and stabilization and is scalable for vehicles ranging from nano-spacecraft to crafts as large as the International Space Station.

The technology has additional applications beyond spacecraft, as well, including in rockets, cars, robots, ships and even health care, Burgett said.

“The main selling point of this technology is that it provides affordable, low-power and high-control-authority orientation control for spacecraft, particularly nano- and micro-satellites that have mass, size and power constraints,” Sanyal said. “Currently, we are prototyping a three-unit ASCMG cluster where each unit will be the world’s smallest control moment gyroscope.”

The Launch program helps transition early-stage research projects into marketable products by exploring a technology’s commercial potential very early in development and providing funding and resources for that work.

“Arrowhead’s Launch and Studio G provide substantial help for technology-related business development,” Sanyal said, “which in turn can have great returns on the investment. In addition, such technology-related business models can also have a positive effect on the local economy and that of the state of New Mexico.”

Jason Koenig, Arrowhead’s director of entrepreneurship and commercialization, who oversees Launch, said the program has a new format in this, its fourth year, awarding work space and $5,000 in kick-off funding to each of six finalist projects, which then received four months of intensive development and mentorship to assess and validate technologies, explore customer development and identify investment opportunities. The six projects then competed for the opportunity to win seed funding of up to $25,000.

Burgett said it means a lot to have their technology and business model chosen by judges who have proven themselves to be successful entrepreneurs.

“The next steps are testing the prototype and quantifying how much smaller, lower-power and reliable the device can be compared to existing technologies,” Burgett said. “The Launch award is a key investment that lets us move ahead with those plans, and we’ll be looking for opportunities to raise more money along the way.”

The other five Launch finalists were:

  • A high-voltage programmable current regulator developed by NMSU electrical and computer engineering associate professor Paul Furth, which provides a lightweight, low-cost, high-speed alternative in a range of sensing and testing environments, including chemical weapons, explosives and drug detection and air quality monitoring
  • A weight-balanced test stand for testing micro air vehicles or small unmanned aerial vehicles, developed by NMSU mechanical and aerospace engineering professor Ou Ma to use as a power-efficient system for MAV and UAV testing.
  • An innovative photoreactor process using nanocomposite photocatalyst fibers for water treatment and disinfection, or photocatalysis, developed by NMSU civil and geological engineering research associate professor Huiyao Wang. The process uses solar energy to remove toxins and pathogens from water, offering a green alternative to traditional water treatment systems.
  • Flooid Lingo, an online social media platform developed by Christopher Dunn, an NMSU economics and computer science master’s student. The platform is a database and network app that allows users to invent and share new words and definitions, as well as to track words and phrases that are trending on social media.
  • Timer Glove, a device developed by NMSU engineering student Mariel Haddad that’s a “smart glove” designed to improve exercise and workout efficiency with real-time monitoring and tracking of weightlifting activities.

Koenig said this year’s competition was the largest yet, and all of the participants worked very hard to develop their technologies in a short timeframe. They presented their technology at an April demonstration day for the judges, followed by a reception to celebrate all the work that each team had done.

“Our judges all commented on how outstanding all of the projects were and how much they enjoyed learning about them,” Koenig said.

He said the judges selected the gyroscope technology because Sanyal, Prabhakaran and Burgett demonstrated great awareness of the market niche and an excellent strategy to successfully get there.

Launch is supported by the U.S. Economic Development Administration’s i6 Challenge program, which seeks to support commercialization of the nation’s most promising emerging ideas and technologies.

For more information about Launch,

For more information about the adaptive singularity-free control moment gyroscope technology, email ascmg.info@gmail.com.

WELLS FARGO CONTINUES SUPPORT OF NMSU PROGRAMS THAT BENEFIT STUDENTS, COMMUNITY

Date: 05/07/2015

Writer: Amanda Bradford, 575-646-1996, ambradfo@nmsu.edu

Wells Fargo has announced it will provide more than $50,000 this year to support programs at New Mexico State University that have an impact across a wide variety of disciplines.

“I am proud that Wells Fargo continues to make significant investments in our community and with NMSU,” said Ryan McGrath, vice president and business banking manager at Wells Fargo. “The diversity of our giving will empower students to seek innovative and engaging ways to grow New Mexico’s 21st century economy.”

“This is an important and ongoing partnership we’ve established with Wells Fargo,” NMSU President Garrey Carruthers said. “Their continued investment in New Mexico State University will provide opportunities for our students to make significant educational discoveries during their time here on campus, and it will continue to have an impact on our students long after they leave.”

Wells Fargo will substantially boost its support for the Red to Green Money Management Program, which offers free and confidential financial coaching to NMSU students through one-on-one sessions, presentations, social media and special events – and educates students on how to make smart choices to reach their financial goals.

“Wells Fargo’s increased contributions to New Mexico State University – particularly toward their Red to Green Money Management Program – underscores our commitment to supporting innovative learning opportunities and promoting financial literacy in our community,” said Courage Idemudia, vice president and district manager at Wells Fargo.

This year’s gifts also support Arrowhead Center’s Innoventure program for middle- and high-school students, who use science, technology, engineering and math to solve business and technology challenges, focused on a different theme each year. Marie Borchert, education specialist for the Entrepreneurship Institute at Arrowhead Center, who oversees the Innoventure program, said the annual competition gets students thinking about the ways they can contribute to the future of invention and entrepreneurship.

“Several of our winners have taken advantage of the scholarship we award to enroll at NMSU and continue exploring their entrepreneurial ideas with support of Arrowhead Center’s Studio G student business incubator,” Borchert said.

Wells Fargo will also contribute to the President’s Associates Excellence Scholarships, the most prestigious scholarship available to students at NMSU. It is awarded to entering freshmen with markedly superior academic ability. Selection is competitive and based on proven academic achievements and extracurricular activities.

Additional support will go to the NMSU College of Business, in support of its scholarship luncheon, Hall of Fame banquet and Business Advisory Council.

Wells Fargo also continues its sponsorship of the Domenici Public Policy Conference, now in its eighth year. Named for retired U.S. Sen. Pete Domenici, the annual conference attracts more than 900 attendees and brings together some of the country’s top experts to thoughtfully examine and highlight important public policy matters. The conference also hosts a panel of 20 students from across New Mexico who have the opportunity to develop their skills in research, critical thinking and public speaking as they prepare to question each of the speakers.

For more information on Wells Fargo,

CAMP INNOVENTURE CONTINUES SUMMER PROGRAM ALBUQUERQUE SESSION

WRITER: Vicki L. Nisbett, 575-642-1334, vnisbett@yahoo.com

SOURCE: Marie Borchert, 575-646-7839, mhaaland@nmsu.edu

The 2015 Camp Innoventure program at New Mexico State University will host a week-long session in June at NMSU’s Albuquerque Center, in addition to two sessions at the Las Cruces campus’ Arrowhead Center. Registration is open for the sessions.

“It’s exciting to bring Camp Innoventure to Albuquerque,” said Innoventure Director Marie Borchert. “We are able to continue to engage the youth of New Mexico in entrepreneurship through this week of great activities.”

Students entering grades six to eight in August 2015 create their own business ideas from concept to reality at Camp Innoventure, giving them the opportunity to experience real-world competition and success. Brainstorming business ideas, writing a mission statement, putting together a business model and creating a product to sell at the Albuquerque Downtown Growers’ Market are exciting topics that are in store for these students.

Because Camp Innoventure is modeled after Arrowhead Center’s annual Innoventure competition, which encourages students from across the state to use science, technology, engineering and math to solve business problems and create new and innovative products that may have real marketability, the students’ creative sides are truly enhanced.

The Albuquerque session is June 8-13, 2015, from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. each day, at New Mexico State University Albuquerque Center, 4501 Indian School NE, Alb., NM 87110; students will sell the products they develop at the Albuquerque Downtown Growers’ Market on June 13, 2015.

For more information about the Albuquerque Camp Innoventure session, contact Erika Dunn at 505-492-1249 or edunn03@ad.nmsu.edu. To register for the Albuquerque camp, visit

The Las Cruces sessions are June 1-6, 2015, and June 8-13, 2015, from 9 a.m. to noon each day.

For more information about the Las Cruces Camp Innoventure sessions, contact Marie Borchert at 575-646-7839 or mhaaland@nmsu.edu, or

The registration cost is $40, which includes project materials, workbook materials and a camp backpack.

The Innoventure program is supported by Arrowhead Center and by grants and gifts from the Daniels Fund, AT&T, the MS Doss Foundation and Wells Fargo.

CAMP INNOVENTURE SUMMER PROGRAM ACCEPTING MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENT REGISTRARS

WRITER: Vicki L. Nisbett, 575-642-1334, vnisbett@yahoo.com

SOURCE: Marie Borchert, 575-646-7839, mhaaland@nmsu.edu

Registration is open for middle school students in New Mexico to participate in the 2015 Camp Innoventure program at New Mexico State University. Two week-long sessions are planned in June at the Las Cruces campus’ Arrowhead Center and an additional session will be held in Albuquerque.

“We’re excited to be bringing Camp Innoventure back for another year,” said Innoventure Director Marie Borchert. “Students learn the basics of entrepreneurship in a fun and engaging way that encourages them to think of their future and how to bring a way of thinking entrepreneurially to many aspects of their lives.”

Students who are entering grades six to eight in August 2015 create their own business ideas from concept to reality at Camp Innoventure, giving them the opportunity to experience real-world competition and success. Brainstorming business ideas, writing a mission statement, putting together a business model and creating a product to sell are exciting topics that are in store for these students.

Because Camp Innoventure is modeled after Arrowhead Center’s annual Innoventure competition, which encourages students from across the state to use science, technology, engineering and math to solve business problems and create new and innovative products that may have real marketability, the students’ creative sides are truly enhanced.

The first Las Cruces session is June 1-6, 2015, and the second is June 8-13, 2015. Both sessions are from 9 a.m. to noon each day at Academic Research, Building A, Suite 109, on the New Mexico State University Campus. Everyone will meet outside of the building in the south parking lot.

For more information, contact Marie Borchert at 575-646-7839 or mhaaland@nmsu.edu, or online at https://campinnoventure2015.eventbrite.com

Another session of the camp will be hosted at the NMSU Albuquerque Center. The Albuquerque session is June 8-13, 2015, from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. each day, and students will sell the products they develop at the Albuquerque Downtown Growers’ Market on June 13, 2015.

For more information about the Albuquerque Camp Innoventure session, contact Erika Dunn at 505-492-1249 or edunn03@ad.nmsu.edu. To register for the Albuquerque camp, visit

The registration cost is $40, which includes project materials, workbook materials and a camp backpack.

The Innoventure program is supported by Arrowhead Center and by grants and gifts from the Daniels Fund, AT&T, the MS Doss Foundation and Wells Fargo.

GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONY TO MARK CONSTRUCTION OF BURRELL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE AT NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY

By: Vicki L. Nisbett

President Garrey Carruthers of New Mexico State University and Executive Chairman Daniel Burrell of Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine (BCOM) hosted a groundbreaking ceremony Mon., April 27, 2015, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Arrowhead Park.

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez joined Carruthers, Burrell and honored guests in leading the groundbreaking, marking the construction of the for-profit, privately funded medical school, of which the initial capital investment is about $85 million.

Partnering with NMSU for a variety of student services, BCOM will lease the Arrowhead Park land long-term for the 79,000-square-foot medical school building.

Providing much needed new jobs, workforce development opportunities, and more accessible healthcare for New Mexicans, the new medical school will help boost New Mexico’s economy.

At the groundbreaking, guests were first entertained by Fernando Cellicion, a renowned native flute player, along with the internationally recognized Cellicion Zuni Dancers.

After the initial festivities, the groundbreaking program commenced, followed by a reception with mariachi entertainment at the Arrowhead Park site, located at the northeast corner of Wells Street and Arrowhead Drive.

“Para la gente y el futuro! – For the people and the future!” was the theme of the groundbreaking celebration, and this future begins now.

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION RESEARCH WORKSHOP LAUNCHES POTENTIAL PAYLOADS

Date: May 12, 2015

by Vicki L. Nisbett

A unique and successful International Space Station (ISS) Research Workshop for the New Mexico space ecosystem was held in Las Cruces at the Hotel Encanto de Las Cruces, March 30, 2015, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and hosted by the Arrowhead Technology Incubator. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) presented at the workshop, which was funded by NASA EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research), that ignited potential research to go to station.

Patricia Hynes, director of the New Mexico Space Grant and NASA EPSCoR, and Wayne Savage, executive director of Arrowhead Park, welcomed all that attended.

Forty-eight registered guests and presenters attended informational and discussion sessions. Throughout the series of these sessions, CASIS staff members described how researchers, entrepreneurs, educators and students can access the ISS U.S. National Laboratory. Participants heard about important topics, such as research capability and CASIS assets for researchers; microgravity sensitive research; what lab equipment is available to researchers; prepping experiments for ISS; the cost to go to station; patent protections; and intellectual property information.

Dr. Hynes structured this workshop’s distinctive format.

“This workshop was very successful,” said Hynes. “We have three participants who are ready to go to station, and also a local company founder is very interested as well.”

This one-day workshop’s attendees, whose interests included engagement in microgravity sensitive research and research related to materials in extreme environments, were included in a mix of biologists, physicists and engineers. Identifying their experiments, interests and related investigation capabilities, they also needed to show a willingness to grow a program using the microgravity environment, as noted in their applications for the workshop. NMSU students and faculty also joined the workshop, along with the students and faculty of the University of New Mexico, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and Northern New Mexico College.

Held in plenary session, the session topics included life sciences and biomedical research opportunities; physical and materials sciences and engineering and technology research opportunities; commercial, start up, and entrepreneurial opportunities and related New Mexico assets; and remote sensing and earth observation opportunities. Representatives from CASIS, NMSU, Arrowhead Center, Spaceport America, Virgin Galactic and Dr. Steven Collicott, a seasoned ISS experimenter from the College of Engineering at Purdue University, all gave their significant presentations to the participants.

The three research topics that showed strong promise met the requirements to launch their research experiments within 1 to 3 years. In addition, Calculex, a local company, whose founder is an alumnus of NMSU, was an additional potential research topic.

One of the topics explained was using New Mexico’s Spaceport America to have research equipment first tested in the microgravity environment prior to inclusion of a commercial cargo launch. This determines the viability of the equipment from space-travel stress, not to mention saving lots of money if their equipment is not tested first.

CASIS manages the U.S. National Laboratory on ISS, which accelerates commercial research and development, providing breakthroughs by giving scientific, commercial and educational industries equal access to space to better humankind. Having been appointed by Congress, CASIS identifies opportunities to access ISS, in which researchers take advantage of its unique environment, financially providing a return in investments, but more importantly, improving life on earth to U.S. citizens. CASIS brings together multiple parties that enable innovative research results, assisting in research, making connections, hardware and funding, according to the CASIS website.

The workshop’s goal was twofold as participants learned about how to launch their experiments, and the attendees also helped CASIS learn what lab equipment participants need for their experiments on the Space Station.

For more information about Arrowhead Technology Incubator, visit http://arrowheadcenter.nmsu.edu/blog/Resources/arrowhead-technology-incubator/

For a full list of meeting outcomes, speakers and more, visit

, and more information about CASIS, visit

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