Yeast Breads Michelle Jerantowski

THE FOUR MUST HAVE INGREDIENTS IN A YEAST BREAD RECIPE

Flour gives structure to the dough. The most commonly used flour is all-purpose flour or bread flour.
Liquid provides moisture to form gluten. It also activates the yeast. The temperature is very important because if it's too hot it'll kill the yeast but if its too cold it won't activate the yeast. If the recipe calls for milk it is important to scald the milk before using.
The leavening agent used in yeast bred recipes is well, you guessed it, yeast! Yeast makes the bread rise by producing CO2.
Salts main purpose is to give flavor. It also regulates the action of the yeast. Salt works with flour by inhibiting certain enzymes.

THE SEVEN STEPS FOR YEAST BREAD PREPARATION

STEP 1: MIX DOUGH- This step dissolves the yeast in water. The water should be between 105-115. If it's too hot it will kill the yeast but if it's too cold then the dough will not rise fast enough.
STEP 2: KNEADING THE DOUGH- Using the heals of your hands, work the dough in a push-fold-turn manner until the dough is smooth and elastic. Kneading the dough develops gluten (responsible for the elastic texture of dough). Make sure you don't add too much flour or else it will be too stiff.
STEP 3: PROOFING-Dough sits until it's double in size- This is the first proofing step. Fermentation (yeast acts on the sugars in the bread dough to form alcohol and CO2). takes place in this step. One trick to check if it has risen enough is touch it with your finger. If your fingerprint remains, the dough has risen enough.
STEP 4- PUNCH DOWN- In this step, CO2 (used as a propellant and acidity regulator) releases. At this point, some dough's require a second rising time.
STEP 5- SHAPING DOUGH- Shape the dough according to the recipe.
STEP 6- LET SHAPED DOUGH RISE- Let shaped dough rise until double in size for about 10 minutes. Let it rise in a warm, draft free place.
STEP 7- BAKE- Depending on your recipe directions, dough and shape, baking times and temperatures vary. Dough rises dramatically during first few minutes of baking. This is called oven spring.

Credits:

Created with images by TiBine - "bread roll eat" • JeepersMedia - "Aunt Jemima Flour" • Hans - "faucet water column free standing" • Neubie - "Vegemite" • SoraZG - "Salt_B130604" • agirlnamednee - "new mixer!" • contato1034 - "gastronomy love love story" • grongar - "Potato Rosemary Bread - Shaped and ready to proof" • themissy - "Sourdough Bagels - Punch" • grongar - "Vienna Bread - Shaped into batards" • thms.nl - "Zaterdag"

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