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Police Shootings By Malcolm Gaynor

Part 1: Police shooting victim demographics

The data in part 1 represents the 5,338 fatal police shooting victims in the United States from January 1st, 2015 to March 26th, 2020. Since the data analysis began on the 26th, there have been 28 more fatal police shootings (updated June 4th, 2020). These shootings are not a part of the data below. Also, the data only shows those killed by a firearm. Therefore, the deaths of George Floyd, Eric Garner, and any other person killed by the police without a firearm are not represented in the data. Finally, the 607 killings where, by the 26th, the race of the victim was unreported or unknown are removed from the calculations.

Between January 1st 2015- March 26th, 2020, an American citizen has a 0.00163% chance of being shot and killed by a police officer. However, for Black Americans, this number jumps to 0.00285%, and the number falls to 0.00120% for White Americans. Therefore, Black Americans are over 2.3 times more likely to be shot and killed by cops than White Americans.
Between 2015-2020, Black Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Americans of other races were involved in police shootings at a higher percentage than each demographic's percentage of the US population.
This graph highlights the ratio between the percentage of police shooting victims in each demographic and that demographic's percentage in the US population. For example, because Black people make up 13.4% of the US population, Black people "should" make up 13.4% of the police shooting victims. However, Black people make up 26.51% of police shooting victims. Therefore, Black people make up 1.98 times more police shooting victims compared to the percentage of Black people in the US population.
The data from the United States is an average over the years 2015-2019. The data from Canada is an average over the years 2015-2017, and the data from the United Kingdom is an average over the years 2015-2018. All data is the most recent available from a reliable source. The averages for Canada and the UK have been adjusted to represent the estimated average police killings per year if the population was equal to the United States. The data shows that not only do the United States police force shoot and kill a large amount of people compared to Canada and the UK (over 4 times as many people as Canada and over 50 times as many people as the UK), but that there are more Black Americans shot and killed by the police in the United States than people of any demographic in Canada and the UK. Also, there are more unarmed Black Americans shot and killed by the police in the United States than people of any demographic in the UK, even after the population is adjusted.

Part 2: Police officer killing demographics

The data in part 2 represents police officers feloniously killed between 2015-2019. Data about police shooting victims has been adjusted to fit the same range of time (the data from 2020 is removed), therefore the data is slightly different from part 1. Also, this comparison is not perfectly comparable, as the police officers feloniously killed include those killed by any means, whereas the police shooting victims include only those killed by firearms. Some police officer deaths included multiple assailants, which also may slightly skew the data. The database containing demographics of assailants in police officer killings considered hispanic people as falling under the demographic category of "white." Therefore, in part 2, the demographic of "white" also includes hispanic people for both officers feloniously killed and police shooting victims to allow for a more fair comparison. Data where the race was unreported or unknown was removed from the calculations.

Between 2015-2019, all Americans have a 0.00150% chance of being shot and killed by a police officer, and a 0.000074% chance of killing a police officer. For every racial demographic, the percent likelihood of being shot and killed by a police officer is at least 13 times greater than the percent likelihood of killing a police officer.
This graph compares the percent of each demographic in the US population, the percent of each demographic in police shooting victims, and the percent of each demographic in felonious police officer killings. The data shows that for White Americans, the percent of both shooting victims and assailants in police officer killings are both below the percent of White Americans in the US population. Inversely, the data shows that for Black Americans, the percent of both shooting victims and assailants in police officer killings are both above the percent of Black Americans in the US population. It is important to note that there are far fewer total police officer killings than victims of police shootings, so that percentage is more easily skewed because of the smaller number of incidents, and it is also important to note that percent of total police interactions are not equivalent for each demographic, and certain demographics are unfairly targeted by police, leading to more interactions that are reflected by the percentage of each demographic in the population (as shown in the 4th source below).
This graph compares the ratio between the percentage of police shooting victims in each demographic and that demographic's percentage in the US population to the ratio between the percentage of assailant in felonious police officer killings in each demographic and that demographic's percentage in the US population between 2015-2019. For example, Black people make up 1.97 times more police shooting victims compared to the percentage of Black people in the US population. Black people also make up 2.85 times more assailants in felonious police officer killings compared to the percentage of Black people in the US population. Similarly to the graph above, it is important to note that there are far fewer total police officer killings than victims of police shootings, so that percentage is more easily skewed because of the smaller number of incidents, and it is also important to note that percent of total police interactions are not equivalent for each demographic, and certain demographics are unfairly targeted by police, leading to more interactions that are reflected by the percentage of each demographic in the population (as shown in the 4th source below).
This graph combines the fatal interactions between cops and civilians (police shootings and felonious police officer killings) between 2015-2019. In total, 4.71% of fatal interactions led to police officer deaths. That number is largest in the demographic of Black people, where 6.80% of the fatal interactions led to police officer death. Similarly to the graphs above, it is important to note that there are far fewer total police officer killings than victims of police shootings, so that percentage is more easily skewed because of the smaller number of incidents, and it is also important to note that percent of total police interactions are not equivalent for each demographic, and certain demographics are unfairly targeted by police, leading to more interactions that are reflected by the percentage of each demographic in the population (as shown in the 3rd source below).

Credits:

Created with images by Alec Favale - "Times Square NYPD Security" • Kilyan Sockalingum - "untitled image" • Franck CHARLES - "untitled image" • Pierre Herman - "Cops" • Matt Popovich - "A police car belonging to the United States Secret Service Uniformed Division patrols a street adjacent to the White House in Washington, DC." • ev - "untitled image" • Joseph Ngabo - "untitled image" • LOGAN WEAVER - "PORTRAITS INSTAGRAM - @LGNWVRPRTRTS EDITORIAL INSTAGRAM - @LGNWVRPHTO PERSONAL INSTAGRAM - @LGNWVR" • AJ Colores - "After the Donald Trump Rally in Phoenix, protestors classed with the police. Tear gas flew both ways.. and eventually the police dispersed the peaceful protestors. The air.. was spicy.. i have a lot of photos from this night if nayone wants to use more. Here is our video recap: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJGUIMWrL3Y&t=0s&list=PLZ-RIhY52KR15j928hDU6BNWvjMoRIteX&index=99" • Jack Finnigan - "NYC police force" • Koshu Kunii - "Black Lives Matter Protest June 2020" • Matteo Modica - "Colorful New York City at night with police and the Big Apple's typical smoke cloud."