Tlaloc Iniguez-Cortez English 9, Period 3 Shakespeare Shakespeare is arguably one of the greatest writers to ever live. Shakespeare's early years as a child, early career in London as well as his fame and work in the Globe theater has shaped him to be the person we know today.

Shakespeare's Early Years

Source: Anderson, Robert. "William Shakespeare's Life: A Genius From Stratford." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

"William attended grammar school, where he studied Latin grammar, Latin literature, and rhetoric (the uses of language). As far as we know, he had no further formal education." (Anderson page 777). Shakespeare as we know was born to a family that had some importance in Stratford because of his father, John Williams. The fact that Shakespeare was in this position, allowed him to be a part of grammar school where he would start to discover and learn about Latin. It is said that Shakespeare somewhat put some time into his work at grammar school, but not to the point where he was bored. Shakespeare studied and learned more about Latin and how it's grammar and literature worked with rhetoric, which could've given him a spark of enjoyment and passion in his early years of writing. Now, like many teenagers at his age, Shakespeare only attended grammar school in his childhood and would later on not continue in any further education, but we do know that at this time he would find himself married and going to London in a few years. It is not well known about what Shakespeare did a little after grammar school, but it would possibly be around the lines of having a job with is dad and or even writing down his own works.

Source: Lander, Jesse M. "Shakespeare, William." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 17 Nov. 2016.

"In spite of the long hours he spent in school, Shakespeare’s boyhood was probably not all boring study. As a market center, Stratford was a lively town. In addition, holidays provided popular pageants and shows, including plays about the legendary outlaw Robin Hood and his merry men. By 1569, traveling companies of professional actors were performing in Stratford. Stratford also held two large fairs each year, which attracted numerous visitors from other counties. For young Shakespeare, Stratford could thus have been an exciting place to live." (Lander). Shakespeare's childhood wasn't just all a boring study and no fun type of life, even though he had to spend most of his time at school. The way in which Shakespeare's life was not all boring goes back to the type of town and environment he lived in. Stratford, Shakespeare's hometown, was a market center where many things happened everyday, so it wasn't just a plain, lonely and dead town. In fact, at the time in which Shakespeare was living there as a child, many traveling companies of professional actors were performing and putting a sort of play for the visitors and hometown people of Stratford. This could have inspired and given Shakespeare a pathway to knowing what he loves to do.

Source: "William Shakespeare." <i>Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition</i> (2016): 1-4. <i>History Reference Center</i>. Web. 2 Dec. 2016.

"While little is known of Shakespeare's boyhood, he probably attended the grammar school in Stratford, where he would have been educated in the classics, particularly Latin grammar and literature. Whatever the veracity of Ben Jonson's famous comment that Shakespeare had "small Latine, and less Greeke," much of his work clearly depends on a knowledge of Roman comedy, ancient history, and classical mythology." (William). Shakespeare attended grammar school during the years of his childhood. Shakespeare learned and studied about Latin grammar and literature. Shakespeare of course as said before, was said to spend many hours in his school, which was not something that would bore him because of the town he lived in. One thing though that is said about Shakespeare is that he had very small knowledge on Latin and Greek, and had more in Roman. He was said to know about Roman comedy, history and classic mythology, which could of lead him to knowing that he had a passion for acting based on him possibly reading or learning about Roman. Of course it sounds weird that even though Shakespeare studied about Lain in his early years, he still didn't have that much knowledge about it. This could also lead many people to infer that Shakespeare's knowledge in both Latin and Roman writing could of helped and lead him to writing the famous plays and poems he wrote in his complicated language.

Shakespeare's Early Career

Source: Lander, Jesse M. "Shakespeare, William." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 17 Nov. 2016.

"After arriving in London, Shakespeare began an association with one of the city’s repertory theater companies. These companies consisted of a permanent cast of actors who presented a variety of plays week after week. The companies had aristocratic patrons, and the players were technically servants of the nobles who sponsored them. But the companies were commercial operations that depended on selling tickets to the general public for their income." (Lander). When Shakespeare had arrived to London, he became a part of an association and theater company that was known about in the city. This company consisted of a permanent working cast of actors who presented plays weekly throughout most of the year. These actors were considered to be servants of the nobles who sponsored and helped them, but the company would not be able to keep the show going like that. Instead the company relied on selling tickets to the public in order to profit for their income. This became a way of life for Shakespeare, and could of shaped him to the poet and play write we know today. All the hard work and dedication to being a part of this company, as well as doing plays and different acts on a weekly basis could have helped and given new ideas to Shakespeare about the future plays and poems he would write in the future.

Source: Anderson, Robert. "William Shakespeare's Life: A Genius From Stratford." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

"By 1594, he was a charter member of the theatrical company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, which was later to become the King's Men.Shakespeare worked with this company for the rest of his writing life. Year after year he provided it with plays, almost on demand. Shakespeare was the ultimate professional writer. He had a theater that needed plays, actors who needed parts, and a family that needed to be fed." (Anderson page 777). Shakespeare became a part of the Lord Chamberlain's Men (later on becoming the King's Men), working for the company for his whole writing career. Shakespeare was constantly working and writing plays for this company everyday, forcing him to come up with new works and ideas of plays. It was said that Shakespeare provided plays, to the point where it was mostly on demand. This type of job, especially with the success at the Globe theater made Shakespeare a much more well known person, being seen as one of the best professional writers at the time. Shakespeare had a theater that needed plays and actors that needed parts, so most of the pressure and work that is know today had to all be given to Shakespeare.

Source: Baker, William. "Shakespeare, William." In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. <i>The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare</i>. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. <i>Bloom's Literature</i>, Facts On File, Inc. www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&amp;WID=103800&amp;SID=5&amp;iPin=CS0001&amp;SingleRecord=True.

"At some point after his marriage, and probably after the birth of his children, Shakespeare must have made his way to London and joined the theatrical world there. Little is known for certain about how this happened, but it is thought that Shakespeare might have first worked as a minor actor in one of London's theater companies before making his name as a playwright. In 1592, in Greene's Groatsworth of Wit , the well-known poet, dramatist, and prose writer Robert Greene (1558–92) mentioned Shakespeare in a way implying that Shakespeare was at the time a force to be reckoned with on the London stage." (Baker). Shakespeare traveled and went to London during the time of his marriage, mainly when all of his children were born. At this point, it is known that Shakespeare would start to be involved in his early childhood experience of being a part of the theatrical world. Many don't specifically know how Shakespeare got involved and became a part of his job, but it is said that he started off as a minor actor in the company we know as the Chamberlain's Men (Later called the King's Men). He would later on move up and become the playwright where Shakespeare would write and make his famous plays that we know today. But, before he moved up to become the person we know as today, somebody by the name of Robert Greene was able to possibly see Shakespeare during his job as a minor actor. Greene though mentioned something that would later on be noticed about Shakespeare that many people didn't see at the time. Greene said something along the lines of: Shakespeare is an actor and person in this company that is important and should be taken into consideration, he is to be taken seriously when working. In other words Greene saw the young Shakespeare to be successful and lead this company to a brighter future and that it's owners should keep an eye out on him, for good reasons.

Shakespeare and The Globe Theater/Early Fame

Source: ---. "Shakespeare And His Theater: A Perfect Match." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

"Sometimes playwrights influence the shape and form of a theater, but more often existing theaters seem to influence the shape and form of plays. It is important that we understand Shakespeare's theater because it influenced how he wrote his plays. Shakespeare took the theater of his time, and he used it brilliantly." (Anderson page 778). Shakespeare had probably one of the best and most favored theaters in London during his time, but it was not just because of the theater itself. The Globe theater of course did play a huge role in Shakespeare's success but it wasn't just as easy as just getting a theater and doing your own thing. No, this theater was a special theater after it was rebuilt during the 18th century. The Globe theater had a setting and features that Shakespeare knew would make his company much more successful than where it was at the time. Shakespeare used the Globe theater in the way where the plays performed there would fit in and make sense, not the other way around. That's why plays like Romeo and Juliet still fits in so well with the current remodel of the Globe theater.

Source: ---. "Shakespeare And His Theater: A Perfect Match." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

"We can see that this stage, with it's few sets and many acting areas-forestage, inner stage, and upper stage-made for a theater of great fluidity. That is, scene could follow scene with almost cinematic ease." (Anderson page 779). The Globe theater was a theater where when it was built, Shakespeare and his company thought further ahead on how it would be easier and much more successful to do a play. In other words, the Globe theater was built having many different levels of stages, so different parts of a play would look realistic and so every scene that would occur during the play would flow with ease. As we know the globe theater had a fore stage, inner stage and upper stage, meaning actors that played parts on a balcony already had a place to go to act out that was easy to access and no constructed backgrounds were needed to be waited for. Also, this meant that some actors could wait for their parts at any part of the stage and prepare while the scene is occurring somewhere else. Altogether, the Globe theater was also used by Shakespeare in which he would write his plays based on how they would fit in the theater. This created a good flow from scene to scene.

Source: "William Shakespeare." <i>Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition</i> (2016): 1-4. <i>History Reference Center</i>. Web. 2 Dec. 2016.

"In 1594 Shakespeare became an actor and playwright for the Lord Chamberlain's Men, the company that later became the King's Men under James I. Until the end of his London career Shakespeare remained with the company; it is thought that as an actor he played old men's roles, such as the ghost in Hamlet and Old Adam in As You Like It. In 1596 he obtained a coat of arms, and by 1597 he was prosperous enough to buy New Place in Stratford, which later was the home of his retirement years. In 1599 he became a partner in the ownership of the Globe theatre, and in 1608 he was part owner of the Blackfriars theatre. Shakespeare retired and returned to Stratford c.1613. He undoubtedly enjoyed a comfortable living throughout his career and in retirement, although he was never a wealthy man." Shakespeare as we all know, became an actor and playwright for the Lord Chamberlain's Men (later known as the King's Men) for the rest of his writing career. Shakespeare remained with the company for so long that he still was an actor, playing old men's roles. As Shakespeare planned his retirement though, he was partially in the ownership of the Globe theater meaning that he still was a part of it's success even after he wrote all his memorable plays that we read about and enjoy to this day. The Globe theater was pretty much Shakespeare's friend and companion when it came to writing plays and doing all the great works he has done. The theater gave Shakespeare a lot of influence, ideas and also the fame and success that we appreciate to know and read about in the world today. We know that Shakespeare and the company he worked for built the theater, but the fact that they designed it in such a beneficial, new, modern way gave them a slight improvement over others.

Source: Baker, William. "Shakespeare, William." In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. <i>The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare</i>. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. <i>Bloom's Literature</i>, Facts On File, Inc. www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&amp;WID=103800&amp;SID=5&amp;iPin=CS0001&amp;SingleRecord=True.

"As we have seen, by 1594, William Shakespeare was an established dramatist on the London stage. But the first of his works to appear in print was not a play but the 1194-line narrative poem Venus and Adonis ... Venus and Adonis was probably Shakespeare's most popular published work, perhaps because of its openly erotic content. Between 1593 and 1636, it went through 16 editions and was frequently alluded to in the works of others." Shakespeare was possibly a minor actor before he became the famous playwright of London, but how did Shakespeare start to be well known for his writing? Well, it was not by Shakespeare releasing a play, but instead a narrative poem he finished working on called Venus and Adonis. This would not be what most people expected out of Shakespeare, well what we would expect to be his big launch, but it is how he became well known and this poem did become very popular. The reason for this was because the poem Venus and Adonis had openly erotic content that most readers really haven't seen before. Venus and Adonis was probably Shakespeare's most popular published work, which is really a fantastic start for a writer, especially for Shakespeare in his career. The fact that Shakespeare had this big advantage and success at his start with this poem had helped him gain both fame and a good reputation in his job at the company. This poem could of probably convinced the people at the company to move up Shakespeare;s position later on.

Works Cited

Anderson, Robert. “Shakespeare And His Theater: A Perfect Match.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

---. “William Shakespeare’s Life: A Genius From Stratford.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Baker, William. “Shakespeare, William.” In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. Bloom’s Literature, Facts On File, Inc. www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&WID=103800&SID=5&iPin=CS0001&SingleRecord=True.

Lander, Jesse M. “Shakespeare, William.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 17 Nov. 2016.

“William Shakespeare.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2016): 1-4. History Reference Center. Web. 2 Dec. 2016.

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Created with images by edenpictures - "William Shakespeare" • ell brown - "Birthplace of Shakespeare and Giftshop" • chrgerhart - "united kingdom clock clock tower" • Peter Glyn - "Globe Theatre"

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