Sedimentary Rocks Sedimentary rocks are types of rock that are formed by the deposition and subsequent cementation of that material at the Earth's surface and within bodies of water.

Sedimentary rock formation begins with igneous, metamorphic, or other sedimentary rocks. When these rocks are exposed at the earth's surface they begin the long slow but relentless process of becoming sedimentary rock. Weathering. All rocks are subject to weathering.
There are different types of sedimentary rocks

Sedimentary rocks are types of rock that are formed by the deposition and subsequent cementation of that material at the Earth's surface and within bodies of water.

The three types of sedimentary rocks are organic,inorganic and chemical

The sediment in an organic sedimentary rock is made of fossils! The hard parts of animals, such as bones and shells, can become cemented together over time to make rock. Usually the bones and shells are made of calcite, or similar minerals, and the organic rock that is made from them is called limestone
Inorganic rocks (detrital rocks) have clastic texture and can be grouped as conglomerate and breccia, which are made of gravel-sized particles (>2 mm) surrounded by finer grained material. If larger particles are angular, it is called a sedimentary breccia. A breccia indicates the material has not been transported great distances. Both rocks indicate deposition in a high-energy environment characteristic of streams and beaches.
Chemical sedimentary rock forms when mineral constituents in solution become supersaturated and inorganically precipitate. Common chemical sedimentary rocks include oolitic limestone and rocks composed of evaporite minerals, such as halite (rock salt), sylvite, barite and gypsum.

Sedimentary rocks form when mud and sand are deposited in layers on the Earth's surface. The layers are deposited in many environments including oceans, rivers and deserts. These layers of sand and mud are later buried. The weight of overlying layers compresses the mud and sand to form solid rock.

Igneous rock (derived from the Latin word ignis meaning fire), or magmatic rock, is one of the three main rock types, the others being sedimentary and metamorphic. Igneous rock is formed through the cooling and solidification of magma or lava.
Obsidian is a naturally occurring volcanic glass formed as an extrusive igneous rock. It is produced when felsic lava extruded from a volcano cools rapidly with minimal crystal growth.
A metamorphic rock is a result of a transformation of a pre-existing rock. The original rock is subjected to very high heat and pressure, which cause obvious physical and/or chemical changes. Examples of these rock types include marble, slate, gneiss, schist.
a metamorphic rock with a banded or foliated structure, typically coarse-grained and consisting mainly of feldspar, quartz, and mica.

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