Book Project The grea gatsby

Theme

Scott. Fitzgerald Book The Great Gatsby is a story of the thwarted love between a man and a woman. The main theme of the novel, however, encompasses a much larger, less romantic scope. It reveals The Great Gatsby is a highly symbolic meditation on 1920s America as a whole, in particular the disintegration of the American dream in an era of unprecedented prosperity and material excess.

This theme is evident through the character of Jay Gatsby and in the event when he threw all those meaningless expensive splendid house parties

  • "I told that boy about the ice." Myrtle raised her eyebrows in despair at the shiftlessness of the lower orders. "These people! You have to keep after them all the time."She looked at me and laughed pointlessly... (2.69-70)
  • Tom Buchanan of Chicago, with more pomp and circumstance than Louisville ever knew before. He came down with a hundred people in four private cars, and hired a whole floor of the Seelbach Hotel, and the day before the wedding he gave her a string of pearls valued at three hundred and fifty thousand dollars. (4.135)
  • We shook hands and I started away. Just before I reached the hedge I remembered something and turned around."They're a rotten crowd," I shouted across the lawn. "You're worth the whole damn bunch put together." (8.44-45)

Characterization:Jay Gatsby

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