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Ice Age in Baikal Stories from the frozen Siberian lake. By Justin Jin

Baba Luba (Grandma Luba) skates along Russia's Lake Baikal. She got her skates as a child and has kept them till now, at 78 years old. She uses them to get to places during winter. Crowned the "Jewel of Siberia", Baikal is the world's deepest lake, and the biggest lake by volume, holding 20% of the world's fresh water. In the winter, the lake 31,722 square meter surface is entirely frozen with ice averaging 2 meters thick.
An orthdox Christian pilgram group, led by Father Evgeny, walks from Ust-Barguzin, a port town along the shore at Russia's Lake Baikal, southward in a clockwise journey.
Buryati ice fishermen try to catch fish on the ice for food at Russia's Lake Baikal. After decades of overfishing by the fishing industry, Baikal is running out of fish, and locals are bearing the consequence.
New Year celebration by Buryati villagers living in Selenga in the Kabansk region along the shore at Russia's Lake Baikal.
A shaman leads a prayer to seek forgiveness from the forest -- before cutting it down. The timber is carried across the border to China to meet its construction demands.
Women enjoy a natural hotspring during winter along the northern shore at Russia's Lake Baikal, near Severobaikalsk.
Inside an ice cave in Olkhon island in the heart of Russia's Lake Baikal. The icicles are formed as the waves bash against the cave, and curved by the strong winds.
Setting up a tent on the first night of the trek across frozen Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia. They are a group of five people: Justin Jin (Chinese-British), Heleen van Geest (Dutch), Nastya and Misha Martynov (Russian) and their Russian guide Arkady. They pulled their sledges 80 km across the world's deepest lake, taking a break on Olkhon Island. They slept two nights on the ice in -15c. Baikal, the world's largest lake by volume, contains one-fifth of the earth's fresh water and plunges to a depth of 1,637 metres. The lake is frozen from November to April, allowing people to cross by cars and lorries.
The ice on Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia. Five people: Justin Jin (Chinese-British), Heleen van Geest (Dutch), Nastya and Misha Martynov (Russian) and their Russian guide Arkady pulled their sledges 80 km across the world's deepest lake, taking a break on Olkhon Island. They slept two nights on the ice in -15c. Baikal, the world's largest lake by volume, contains one-fifth of the earth's fresh water and plunges to a depth of 1,637 metres. The lake is frozen from November to April, allowing people to cross by cars and lorries.
Justin and his friends trekked across the late over two nights, three days, sleeping in a tent on ice.

Photographer. Writer. Storyteller. Justin Jin produces stories for the world's finest media, from the National Geographic and Geo to the New York Times. International prizes attest to his dedication.

Justin speaks five languages -- English, Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese, Russian, French and Dutch, and splits his time between Europe and China.

Born in Hong Kong, he studied philosophy and social science at Cambridge University. His started his career as a journalist at Reuters news agency in London and Beijing, and then embarked on an independent path, having lived in Moscow, Amsterdam and now Brussels.