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Conejo Valley Fly Fishers newsletter | SEPTEMBER 2020

Opening photo: Joe Callewaert, showing his skill set on Crowley Lake in August

CONEJO VALLEY FLY FISHERS | NEWSLETTER FOR SEPTEMBER 2020

As our club still deals with the "shutdown" of social activites due to the pandemic, we hope you're still finding time and well enough to get out and stretch your legs or better yet, cast your line on some beautiful waters.

One truth is, the fact that stands the test of time, is that being outdoors and in the fresh air is good for the soul, body and mind. That truth is being seen, proven and standing firm in the face of the pandemic.

So find time to get out your gear, get to a stream or lake, tie a fly on, cast, mend your line or let it sink and set that hook at the slightest hit of an underwater customer!

Whether you find a monster at the end of your line or a gorgeous wild golden trout, the end result is that there is much satisfaction in expressing our freedom in this great country of ours by going fly fishing!

MEETING for september

This month we are hosting the Zoom meeting on Wednesday, September 16th at 7:00 with an open invitation to the Sespe Fly Fishers!

Featuring Carpenteria's very own, Casey Cloud with his presentation "Corbina on the Fly".

Casey being a local, So-Cal, Ventura county resident and living minutes from one of the most productive beaches for chasing one of the most difficult fish to spot, cast to and bring in . . . "the Corbina", will share his hands on experience to the presentation.

Casey will talk about gear, flies, where and when to go. What to look for and how to spot corbina doing what they love to do -- eat!

The zoom link will be emailed out the Monday before and the morning of the meeting. If you would like a reminder text an hour before the meeting, email Cece Rubin at: conejovalleyflyfishers@gmail.com

Non-club members can RSVP at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/zoom-event-speaker-casey-cloud-corbina-on-the-fly-tickets-119634330503

You can follow Casey on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/cloudfly805/

PRESIDENT'S FLY BOX / CHARLEY BEALS

It is called angling for a reason

It is September and our season is winding down…. I am about ready to put this one in the books, close it up and not look back.

I am thinking that the proper way to look at this year will be to focus on the positives, and yes, they are available… you just need to sift through the piles to find them.

We will have a few more weeks available and the very real possibility of landing the biggest fish of the season, as it is that time of the year. The crowds are thinning out and the fish are on the bite. Guides, lodging, and water are available and waiting for you to arrive. You deserve this - treat yourself.

This is what I have been working on this season, hope it helps you land your personal best.

In surf or moving water, there is a time and a place to have your rod tip high in the air and it is at the end of the fight when you are landing the fish.

A high rod tip gets the fish higher in the column where the water is moving faster - now you are fighting the current and the fish. Try this instead - low rod tip with side pressure.

You can steer most any fish if you lay the rod upstream the fish will swim upstream as the low angle allows the fish to find the deeper water and mostly charge to "Safety" upstream.

When the fish gets above you then raise the rod tip and let the current bring it to your net. Conversely a downstream and low rod tip will put belly in the line and that Donkey will find a snag and leave you with a permanent scar. A good story, but a scar none the less.

Get out there and have some fun - it is a good move.

Take care,

Charley Beals, President CVFF

SHARE, LISTEN, LEARN . . .

SPEAKERS & PRESENTATION DATES FOR 2020

Check your emails for confirmation of meetings scheduled online or in person.

SCOTT OLSON | SEPTEMBER 2020 MISSIVE

LOCAL FLIES, ARE THEY A “THING”?

" the super duper rainbow creepy crawly with wiggly legs"

I've fished my share of places outside of California and the one thing almost all locals (including fly shops and guides) have in common is their almost religious adherence to some special homegrown fly.

If I was a cynic (something I've been accused of on occasion) I'd chalk this up to a nefarious intent on the locals part to separate me from some of my hard earned cash with the promise of catching more fish via their magic fly. Am I wrong?

I've found that as long as you cover a trout's basic food groups you should be able to catch fish anywhere that they live. Keeping mayflies, caddis, stone flies and a variety of terrestrials etc. in their nymph and adult forms should hold you in pretty good stead when you are on trout water.

With that said, size does (and frequently can) matter, so be sure to have everything down to size 24 in your boxes (I've fished flies as small as #32's) and don't forget to have a mix of colors as well.

With this strategy you should have a leg up on your quarry and if the locals tell you that you need the super duper rainbow creepy crawly with wiggly legs that is only available from them, just give them a knowing smile and keep the smirks to yourself.

Tight lines and great fishing to all!

Scott Olson

FLY TYING | 3rd Tuesdays of the Month

FLY TYING & CASUAL HANGOUT WHILE SOCIAL DISTANCING | 3rd tuesday of the month

Tuesday, September 15, 2020 at Steve Anderson's Home | 6:00 PM

Following C19 guidelines: Attend only if you are well. Bring a mask and/or hand sanatizer. Bring a camping chair for social distancing and your own snacks & beverages. Bring your best BS fishing story and get ready to have a good time!! Oh yea -- and maybe tie a fly or two! MUST RSVP TO ATTEND: smasma@earthlink.net

To find out more, visit our fly tying meeting page on our website | LINK

GET OUT. EXPLORE. GO FISH.
Set amount donated to: Casting for Recovery SoCal and Kern Valley Search and Rescue.

This year, not even the pandemic can prevent us from having one of our biggest event of the year, the 2020 California Fly Fishing Open. Although, we have slightly changed a few things, we are excited to have it for many reasons:

One of our many goals as a fly fishing club is to give back to the community. We created the California Fly Fishing Open with the hope of building stronger ties with fishy fly fishing folks while also giving back to such an amazing community.

OUTINGS . . . check the website for "pop-up" outings!

CONEJO VALLEY FLY FISHER'S | OUTINGS 2020

AT THIS TIME - All outings are "to be determined" or "on the fly" . . . literally!

We will send out emails for any last minute outings.

* If anyone wants to organize a last minute outing, please email Cece at: conejovalleyflyfishers@gmail.com

CONEJO VALLEY FLY FISHER'S FLY VEST - "CATCH ALL" NEWS and INFORMATION . . .

purple midge contest update

- SCOTT & MARILYN OLSON -

Little flies can lead to BIG FISH!

SEPT 2020: Charley Beals - 18" & Joe Callewaert - 17"

AUGUST 2020: No new challengers. Charley Beals is in the lead - 18"

JULY 2020: And the leader in the Clubhouse is Charley Beals with this 18” rainbow that he caught and released on the Lower Owens River below Pleasant Valley Dam. The bar has been set so let’s see if the rest of you anglers can best this catch. - Scott Olson

CLUB MEMBER PHOTOS | FISHING, SCENIC, ACTION, RELAXING
Scott's catch and release of the day on Crowley!
A catch on a hatch, caught the best of the batch. Since then, none to match- Scott on Hot Creek!

Scott's gear/set-up for the catch: 3 wt using 7x and a size 20 Elk Hair Caddis

Treasure map to find GOLD! Golden Trout that is!
Horseshoe Meadows
Horseshoe Meadows
California GOLD! Wild Golden Trout / Horseshoe Meadows
Matt on the hunt for the Goldies! Horseshoe Meadows
Can you spot the Marmot?
Some one has been on the feed bag! Thanks @cloudfly805 (Casey Cloud) for the flies!
Vitamin C - "C" for Corbina!
Snuck this one in! Peter Sumner working those muscles.
Snuck this one in too! MONSTER SIZED SUSHI - Nick Nikchevich
REPORTS / NEWS / ARTICLES OF INTEREST

CASTING CALL - INTERVIEW OF A CASTING INSTRUCTOR | featuring molly semenik

Written by Leigh Ann Swanson, SWCFFI Vice President

* Leigh Ann is also a certified casting instructor.

Leigh Ann Swason's third article in a series of interviews of casting instructors. In this interview, Leigh Ann (VP-SWCFFI) interviews Molly Semenik, a Certified Casting Instructor (CI), Master Certified Casting Instructor (MCI), and a Two-Handed Certified Instructor (THCI).

CONSERVATION . . .

ARMY CORPS PAUSES PERMITTING FOR PEBBLE MINE DUE TO UNAVOIDAblE RISKS

The agency found that the proposed gold and copper mine would cause “unavoidable adverse impacts to aquatic resources” in Alaska’s pristine Bristol Bay watershed that has sustained Indigenous subsistence cultures for thousands of years.

A complete reversal on the Pebble Mine by the Army Corp of Engineers! It's not dead but it is on the death bed.

enjoy the view, breath in the fresh air . . .

TEAM CRAYFISH SNARES NATIONAL COMPETITION

August 13, 2020 | By Ian Bradley ianbradley@theacorn.com

A group of students from Medea Creek Middle School in Oak Park was named the grand prize winner last week of the Our Echo- Challenge, a new STEM competition that asked U.S. middle school students to take a closer look at biodiversity in their communities, identify threats to local ecosystems and propose solutions to help preserve, protect, or repair those natural resources. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and math.

Team Crayfish, made up of students Pasha Heydari, Cheng Ning, Benjamin Rassibi and their mentor and science teacher, Katie Wilsker, were awarded $10,000, which will allow them to continue work on their project.

The competition was sponsored by EarthEcho International, a nonprofit organization founded in 2000 by siblings Philippe and Alexandra Cousteau, grandchildren of the legendary explorer Jacques Cousteau.

Ten finalist teams joined EarthEcho’s fifth annual Youth Leadership Summit on Aug. 6, where they virtually presented their ideas to restore and protect local biodiversity. The top three teams were awarded grants to turn their projects into a reality. Oak Park’s Team Crayfish won the top prize.

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BLAST FROM THE PAST

Kit Korf's got a handful! |

FOR SALE BY CLUB MEMBERS

FOR SALE | REDINGTON CDL REEL 11/12

FOR SALE | REDINGTON CDL 9/10 REEL

FOR SALE | ABEL SUPER 8 REEL

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OCEAN FLY FISHING? - yea!! - LET'S GO!!

AD FOR LOCAL OCEAN FLY FISHING | OXNARD, CA

Ocean Fly Fishing on the Sea Jay from Channel Islands Sportfishing

Did you know the BIGGEST lake in the world is next to California. It is called the Pacific Ocean and it is loaded with fish that will eat flies. This trip takes place on the Sea Jay from Channel Islands Sportfishing and heads out to the Channel Islands for kelp bass, bonito, barracuda, white seabass and yellowtail. If you know how to double-haul (an absolute must) and have a stripping basket, here are the details –

  • WHEN: September 17 and October 01
  • WHERE: CISCO’s Landing, Oxnard
  • COST: $250.00 per person for each trip.
  • LIMITED LOAD: The trip is limited to 7 people on a boat that normally fishes up to 12
THE DETAILS
  • The boat leaves the dock at 4 a.m. and you can board at 3 a.m.
  • Due to Covid restrictions, we cannot sleep on the boat the night before.
  • There is a bunkroom or you can stay on deck for the journey out to the Islands.
EQUIPMENT
  • Besides a stripping basket of some type, you need a full sink line.
  • We are throwing big flies so unless you are an OUTSTANDING caster, I would recommend 9-11 weight rods.
  • I do have two loaner rods/reels available on first come basis.
  • You need a selection of streamer flies in blues, greens, olives. Clouser patterns work well.
INCIDENTALS
  • Crew tip depends on you. I recommend a minimum of $20.00.
  • If you wish to take fish home, they also clean and package for a nominal fee. BRING A COOLER!
  • If you have Covid concerns (and I think we all do), call me and I can give you the rundown as to how we are making these trips as safe as possible.

Michael Schweit | 818-757-3474 office/home | 818-601-9702 mobile

Panoramic view of Horseshoe Meadows. Can you spot the Marmot? Just a fun note: when holding a dry fly just above the surface the little Goldens would jump out to try to grab it. Small fish, BIG ATTITUDES!!

Fishing for WILD GOLDEN TROUT at Horseshoe Meadows | Cece Rubin

Matt and I had problems with our camper fridge at altitude and we just finished a DYI repair and were revved up to see if our repair had solved the problem.

Now the question became, where can we go at altitude without going all the way to Yosemite? Well, of course, the answer was Horseshoe/Cottonwoods Meadows campground at 10,000 feet, a favorite overnight pre-Whitney altitude preparation for hikers. Also home to probably the most beautiful golden trout in the Eastern Sierra.

With the heat factor easily in the 90's in the Conejo Valley and most of the Eastern Sierras it was also the best choice as once we arrived to the campground, temps dropped by 15-20 degrees to the mid-70's and the night-time temps dropped to 50 degrees. Super nice if you have a heavy down comforter or sleeping bag to wrap yourself up in.

Our one day to fish was Saturday. After a hearty breakfast we hiked no farther than a ¼ mile in to be on the stream, or what little there was of it with a drought like season.

EASY PREY? NOT AT ALL!

Most of the time wild trout are easy to please, but these little Goldens were picky as all heck! They seemed disinterested in hoppers, even during a hopper hatch - but most likely it was because these guys were too little to get the fly in their mouths and most hopper patterns were too big for these guys. But they get an A for effort as they tried and tried over and over. Even size 14/16 was too large.

We finally downsized to 18 to 22 sized caddis and then we started to hit GOLD! Don't get me wrong that it was easy at all. We had difficulty finding small pockets of water that were moving. A lot of the water was flowing ever so slowly or was a sad stagnant pool with "no action". And tying on a 20 or 22 size caddis, even with magnifiers, still a tricky task.

We found one little part of the stream where the water was flowing and there they were. Hiding under the banks and the brush. It was like a normal stream but everything was downsized to the size of the fish - teeny, tiny. They were very timid and easily spooked, but that's what made it so fun. A level playing field!

MILD WEATHER, RAIN, COLD RAIN, HAIL!? WHAT DA HECK!

After a few hours of catch and release fun, a typical afternoon storm came in, then a few minutes into the burst, the temps dropped so much so that the rain quickly turned to hail and we were ill prepared for that. Hail shows up at 32 degrees - "freeeeeezing", so being soaked, pummel by small ice cubes falling from the sky and feeling the cold in our bones, we quickly hiked back to the campground as so did all the others who were enjoying the meadows until then. Note to self, bring a rain parka even on a sunny day!

After being lucky enough to get into the camper and not a rain soaked tent (been there, done that a bunch of times), we took a hot shower, sipped on hot tea and enjoyed watching the busyness of the campground light up with people trying to get out of the rain, abandoning their tents to hunker down in their cars and even a group of campers bunched up under one little canopy.

LOOKING FORWARD TO DREAMING ABOUT THE GOLDEN TROUTIES

The therapy of getting out and fly fishing for California's state fish (fresh water) made for a satisfying day coupled with the storm making it a memorable day for reminiscent stories that start with "remember when . . ."

A few days later Steve Schalla's presentation on the fish added to our excitement as were "just there" catching those little fish with BIG ATTITUDES!

Our trip was a great way to wrap up the month of August and look forward to the changing of the leaves in the fall.

Oh, and our fridge was working better, but not 100%. Maybe a great excuse to go back with a smaller rod or Tenkara and hunt for those tenacious little golden trout up in the meadows where neither the fish or the fisherman feel the pressures of life!

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Most our our trip photos are posted in the "member photos" of this newsletter including a map of the area if you ever want to get into some fish only 3-4 hours north of the Conejo Valley. If you go, think about taking a 3 weight or lighter if you've never fished for these small guys. It's more gentle on these cutie pies and it should feel more like a fair fight! I can see why Scott uses a 1 weight!

Read more about California's state fish the WILD Golden Trout |READ MORE

Rod, reel, line & fly . . .
MORE - CLUB MEMBER PHOTOS . . .

MORE CLUB MEMBER PHOTOS | fly fishing, Fly tying patterns, travel & scenic photos

Cece "newbie" fly tier displaying with trepidation, her "Humpy" and "North Fork Caddis" flies. "Always a work in progress - both the tier and the flies! Zoom fly tying with the SPFF (Sierra Pacific Fly Fishers) has opened up the meetings to visitors. To attend, email Michael at: education2@spff.org
Magee Creek on a hot summer's day . . .

G O T - P H O T O S ?

Please submit photos to: conejovalleyflyfishers@gmail.com

CONEJO VALLEY FLY FISHER'S | club announcements & news . . .
VIDEOS BY JAMES GARRETTSON

JAMES GARRETTSON / YouTube

Fly Fishing Guide Hacks For Hack Fly Fishing Guides w/ HUGE Fly Fisherman

Today we are joined by internet superstar, Huge Fly Fisherman as we unlock the high level secrets of guiding fly fishing. While I can't give away my personal guiding techniques, I've enlisted the help of two recent fly fishing guide school grads to show us what they know best . . .

CONEJO VALLEY FLY FISHERS MEMBERSHIP - "Come fly with me!"
  • MAIL CHECKS TO:
  • Conejo Valley Fly Fishers, 2970 Diana Court, Newbury Park, CA 91320-3115
" F L Y T Y I N G | Group Social & Hang " . . .

PHASES OF THE MOON | tidal charts

Can Moon Phase Affect Your Fly Fishing Success?

Many factors influence your fly fishing success, from water temperatures to tides. Even the position of the sun and moon can play a big role in your catch rate. While some consider moon phase fishing to be an old wives tale, others have noticed a difference in their success rates when fishing by the phases of the moon.

This controversial concept is known as the solunar theory. It was developed in America by John Alden Knight in 1926. Since then, the theory has gained considerable support from scientists and biologists. The name stems from Sol (sun) and Lunar (moon). It is based on the sun and moon’s ability to influence nature and has two periods – major and minor. These periods take place four times a day.

Please remember that using the moon phases to predict a fishing trip is not an exact science and is only one factor in planning a fishing strategy.

Tip 1: "Trout and albacore fishing is usually slower around the full moon because the fish feed at night."

Tip 2: "Migratory fish often come into a river system in greater than average numbers on a higher tide, when weather conditions are favorable."

Tip 3: "Tides are strongest on the full moon which usually makes for the best sturgeon and striper fishing."

Tip 4: "Estuary fish will often feed strongest around a full moon as the increased tidal flow brings greater movement of the bait."

Tip 5: "Saltwater flats will be deeper or shallower during Full Moons and New Moons respectively."

CONEJO VALLEY FLY FISHER'S CALENDAR | Cast, strike, set . . .
COURTESY LISTINGS | in the riffle . . .

COURTESY LISTINGS worth the mention

CONEJO VALLEY FLY FISHER'S | social media . . .
BEAUTY IN WATER . . .

CONTINUE THE ADVENTURE . . .

Fish more, everything less . . .

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

  • President: Charley Beals
  • Vice President: Gary Scott
  • Secretary: Bob Kieling
  • Treasurer / Membership: Kit Korf
  • Trout in the Classroom: Rich & Judy Bollinger
  • Member at Large: Scott Olson
  • Club Outings: Videographer & Marketing: Rick Ferrante
  • Fly Tying Director: Gary Scott
  • Fundraising Chairman: Peter Sumner & Scott Olson
  • Contributing writers: Scott Olson, Mike Weigand, Charley Beals
  • Newsletter/ Website / Facebook / Program Coordinator: Cece Rubin
  • info@conejovalleyflyfishers.com

Opening newsletter photo: "Ride to Low Tide, Huntin' for Corbina" - Charley Beals

Credits:

Created with images by Luca Bravo - "untitled image" • Atharva Dharmadhikari - "untitled image" • Taylor Grote - "Fly Fisherman" • Kalen Emsley - "Wet mountain valley" • Dan Roizer - "Virgin forests around a river" • kazuend - "Rushing Stream" • Jeremy Bishop - "untitled image"