How Cholesterol could stab you in the back 🔪

What Is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that’s found in all cells of the body.

Your body needs some cholesterol to make hormones, vitamin D, and substances that help you digest foods. Your body makes all the cholesterol it needs.

LDL & HDL

What are LDL and HDL?

LDL and HDL are Lipoproteins that help carry cholesterol in the bloodstream.

LDL are low-density lipoproteins HDL are high-density lipoproteins

How do LDL and HDL differ structurally and functionally?

50 percent of the weight of an LDL particle is cholesterol and only 25 percent is protein. High-density lipoprotein particles, on the other hand, consist of 20 percent cholesterol by weight and 50 percent protein. LDL is to carry cholesterol to different parts of the body.

Why do doctors monitor the concentrations of LDL and HDL in patients’ blood?

They are used to help determine the patient's risk of heart disease.

How are the concentrations of LDL and HDL associated with the risk for heart disease and associated disorders?

An excess of LDL can result in plaque buildup on arterial walls which can ultimately result in atherosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis

What other molecules in a patient’s blood are monitored along with LDL and HDL?

Triglyceride, blood sugar level and total cholesterol

High risk: 240 mg/dL and above

Borderline high risk: 200-239 mg/dL

Desirable: Less than 200 mg/dL

Good LDL Below 100 mg/dL

Bad LDL higher than 160 mg/dL

Good HDL greater than 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Bad HDL less than 40 mg/dL

What can patients do to change the levels of LDL and HDL in their blood?

A healthy diet with reduced fat and cholesterol will increase HDL levels and decrease LDL levels.

How does intake of unsaturated, saturated, and Trans fats affect cholesterol levels and overall health?

Unsaturated bring it down and saturated or trans bring it up.

Sources

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/cholesterol-tests-understand-your-results#1

http://www.healthline.com/health/high-cholesterol/vitamin-d-relationship#Cholesterol3

by : Karen Gonzalez , Ivan Albiter

Credits:

Created with images by sportsstan - "Blue Streak" • dtmarch - "Blue" • qimono - "blood cells red" • hakamadare - "wonky_blue" • juhansonin - "Desktop Blood Test" • kalmdown - "IMG_2661.JPG" • medithIT - "website"

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