Costa Rica saN José

Costa Rica, meaning "Rich Coast"), officially the Republic of Costa Rica (Spanish: República de Costa Rica), is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua to the north, Panama to the southeast, the Pacific Ocean to the west, the Caribbean Sea to the east, and Ecuador to the south of Cocos Island. It has a population of around 4.5 million, of whom nearly a quarter live in the metropolitan area of the capital and largest city, San José.

Like most countries, Costa Rica has their own traditional clothing. These traditional garments are worn on holidays and special occasions. During other times, Ticos wear normal western clothing like shorts and t-shirts. A strange fact is that though the weather is warm, men always wear long pants instead of shorts. Still don’t be afraid to wear shorts on the beach, no one will look at you strangely! Costa Ricans, especially working-class people, sometimes eat less to get good stylish clothing because they believe that good clothing leaves a good first impression and that dress is most important, especially when meeting new people. Everyone is expected to wear clean, unwrinkled clothing, especially boys and men. Many people wear jeans and t-shirts and other common clothes, but girls still in grade school can only wear their school uniform during the day because they consider it proper for a girl.

The Pacific coast around Guanacaste, on the other hand is hot and dry, perfect for the many world-class beaches. Costa Rica itself has an average temperature of 70 F to 81 F. Due to its proximity to the equator, it has no real summer or winter. It does however have a rainy season from May to November.

The national flag of the Republic of Costa Rica is based on a design created in 1848. It is also used as the military ensign, and includes the coat of arms of Costa Rica. The civil ensign, commonly used as an unofficial national flag, omits the coat of arms.The flag was officially adopted on November 27, 1906, including a slight modification to the placement and design of the entrenched coat of arms. The flag was updated to reflect concurrent modifications to the national coat of arms in 1964 and 1998.[1]

You can’t set foot in the country without encountering the Costa Rican take on rice and beans. Local lore points to its origin in the tiny town of San Sebastían, where long ago a local resident, Don Bernabe, boasted widely of his prized gallo pinto (spotted hen), which he was saving for the town’s Christmas celebrations. Small-town gossip spread and grew to daunting proportions when Don Bernabe unexpectedly received a crowd of townsfolk eager to try his spotted hen. Being the quick thinker that he was, Don Bernabe decided to pay homage to the appearance of his gallo pinto by frying up copious amounts of white rice and black beans so that everyone had something to eat.The true Costa Rican twist? A few dashes of Salsa Lizano, the ubiquitous national sauce that’s tangy and smoky with a hint of cumin.6. Rice ‘n’ beans.

Translated literally, casado means “married.” Found in nearly any soda (small restaurant serving typical Costa Rican dishes) across the country, casado is the fixed pairing of white rice with a side of savory black beans, a vegetable side (like cabbage slaw dressed in citrus), and a protein — usually a fish fillet, charcoal grilled chicken, or pork chop — smothered in sautéed onions. Pretty much everything you need.

This article is about the demographic features of the population of Costa Rica, including population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population.According to the United Nations, in 2009 Costa Rica has an estimated population of 4,579,000 people. Together, whites and mestizos make up a 94% of the population, 3% are black people, 1% Amerindians, 1% Asians, and 1% other.Just under 3% of the population is of black African descent who are called Afro-Costa Ricans or West Indians and are English-speaking descendants of 19th century black Jamaican immigrant workers. Another 1% is composed of ethnic Chinese, and less than 1% are Middle Easterners, mainly of Lebanese descent but also Palestinians.

One US dollar (USD)equals 555.430 (CRC) Costa Rican Colon. So make sure you know the worth of your money.

Luis Guillermo Solís Rivera (born 25 April 1958) is a Costa Rican politician who has been President of Costa Rica since 2014. He is a member of the center-left Citizens' Action Party (PAC). Solís led the field in the 2014 presidential election, and he was effectively handed the presidency after the runner-up in the first round, San José mayor Johnny Araya Monge, ceased active campaigning. Solís has a long academic and political career, culminating in his election as the first President of Costa Rica to be a member of the PAC. He is the 47th president of Costa Rica. The type of government Unitary presidential constitution republic.

In 1502, Christopher Columbus made landfall in Costa Rica. Soon after, his forces overcame the indigenous people. He incorporated the territory into the Captaincy General of Guatemala as a province of New Spain in 1524. For the next 300 years, Costa Rica was a colony of Spain. As a result, Costa Rica's culture has been greatly influenced by the culture of Spain.[1] During this period, Costa Rica remained sparsely developed and impoverished.Following the Mexican War of Independence (1810–1821), Costa Rica became part of the independent Mexican Empire in 1821. Subsequently, Costa Rica was part of the Federal Republic of Central America in 1823, before gaining full independence in 1838. Its economy struggled due to lack of connections with European suppliers. In 1856, Costa Rica resisted American settlers from mounting a take-over of the government.

They speak Spanish in Costa Rica.

The Roman Catholic Church in Costa Rica is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope in Rome. There are approximately 3.2 million Catholics in Costa Rica - 76% of the total population.[1] The country is divided into eight dioceses and one archdiocese.

This is a map of Costa Rica.

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Created with images by Naturefreak - "toucan brown back-toucan costa rica"

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