Fortunate Son

The song "Fortunate Son" is written and performed by the band Creedence Clearwater Revival.

It was released in September, 1969. "Fortunate Son" was released alongside another song by the same band titled "Down On the Corner".

Lyrics

Some folks are born made to wave the flag

Ooh, they're red, white and blue

And when the band plays "Hail to the chief"

Ooh, they point the cannon at you, Lord

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no senator's son, son

It ain't me, it ain't me; I ain't no fortunate one, no

Some folks are born silver spoon in hand

Lord, don't they help themselves, oh

But when the taxman comes to the door

Lord, the house looks like a rummage sale, yes

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no millionaire's son, no

It ain't me, it ain't me; I ain't no fortunate one, no

Yeah, yeah

Some folks inherit star spangled eyes

Ooh, they send you down to war, Lord

And when you ask them, "How much should we give?"

Ooh, they only answer More! more! more! y'all

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no military son, son

It ain't me, it ain't me; I ain't no fortunate one, one

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate one, no no no

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate son, no no no

Analysis

During the time "Fortunate Son' was released, the American public was coming to realize the that the Vietnam war was an issue. The war was escalating, and anti war activists were beginning to perform peaceful demonstrations. The members of Credence Clearwater Revival were all antiwar musicians, writing music about their beliefs and spreading them through their music. The song not only spoke against the Vietnam war but also against the divide between the upper class and working class of America. The lines "Some folks are born silver spoon in hand" and "Lord, don't they help themselves, oh" are stating that those in the upper class are born with all their needs covered and only help themselves despite the fact that others need help. Delving deeper into the economical divide and how it related to the Vietnam war, the lines "And when you ask them, "How much should we give?" and "Ooh, they only answer More! more! more! y'all" are impugning the credibility of those who are sending soldiers to fight and are demanding too much.

The song ultimately displays the resentment of blind patriotism and the rich. Credence Clearwater Revival is saying "not everyone is born wealthy, and not everyone is born to fight a war".

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