Smallpox The most dangerous virus in the 15th century

The smallpox virus was named one of the most dangerous and deadly viruses of the 15th century. Killing millions of people at a time.

Smallpox gets its reputation because when it hits a group of people, it will whiteout 90% of that groups population. From the 15th century to the 19th century, the virus killed 80 million people.

Smallpox shows up as small blisters on the skin. It starts on the hands and the head, then works its way down to the feet. Smallpox spreads through the air from person to person or with body fluids.

If you were lucky enough to survive the virus, you would either have to suffer the second stage which is weakness and possibly die or live and suffer blindness.

On the good side of things, Smallpox was one of the first viruses to be cured with a vaccine. The vaccine was created in 1796.

Two ways that the virus effected America are that the Americans didn't know that Smallpox existed which caused the second problem. No cure to keep these people safe.

Now, smallpox is not as big as a deal. There is a vaccine and you will most likely not die. Unfortunately, they did not have a cure in the olden day so your life was not a guarantee if you caught Smallpox.

Sources:

  • Wojcik, Lauren. “Smallpox.” Encyclopedia of Native American History, Volume 3, Facts On File, 2011. American Indian History, online.infobase.com/HRC/Search/Details/359008?q=Smallpox. Accessed 2017.
  • Inglesby, Thomas V. "Smallpox." World Book Student, World Book, 2017, www.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar515020. Accessed 24 Apr. 2017.
  • Kessel, William B., and Robert Wooster. “Effects of Smallpox.” Encyclopedia of Native American Wars and Warfare, Facts On File, 2005. American Indian History, online.infobase.com/HRC/Search/Details/190044?q=Smallpox. Accessed 2017.
  • Images from ImageQuest

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