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Love Stream A fairy tale in Shanghai told in real-time. By Justin Jin

In the world’s most crowded social media galaxy, where internet stars burn out as fast as they form, a young Chinese woman stares into a magic mirror that tells her, she is the fairest of them all.

This slender new migrant in Shanghai, constantly walks around with a mobile phone on a selfie stick. The live-streamer self-broadcasts in a country that leads the world in embracing real-time content.

Every day she wakes around midday in her immaculate 20-metre apartment. After ordering a Chinese brunch on her mobile app and applying make-up, she looks at her phone again: a selfie-app further whitens her skin, enlarges her eyes and chisels her chin.

“Friends, ni hao!” she speaks cheerfully to the digital image of herself.

Nai Nai, a 23-year-old live-streamer in Shanghai, China, eats noodles in front of her fans.

Nai Nai’s fans are mostly Chinese men between 15 and 30 years old who post messages and virtual gifts, visible to everyone logged on to her chatroom. 

China’s live­streaming industry reached 425 million subscribers in 2018 out of a current total internet user base of more than 829 million, according to government statistics cited in Chinese state media. Live­stream hosting is an increasingly popular career choice, especially for young Chinese women like Nai Nai.
Nai Nai is spotted in a night market.
Nai Nai and her agent.
Traditional clothes and hair style.
A megastar approaches Nai Nai
Nai Nai, a 23-year-old live-streamer from Shanghai, China, fights like lovers with her friend, the famous live-streamer Jiang Bo in Wuhan city. 

Nai Nai’s fans are mostly Chinese men between 15 and 30 years old who post messages and virtual gifts, visible to everyone logged on to her chatroom. 

China’s live­streaming industry reached 425 million subscribers in 2018 out of a current total internet user base of more than 829 million, according to government statistics cited in Chinese state media. Live­stream hosting is an increasingly popular career choice, especially for young Chinese women like Nai Nai.
Nai Nai, a 23-year-old live-streamer from Shanghai, China, fights like lovers with her friend, the famous live-streamer Jiang Bo in Wuhan city. 

Nai Nai’s fans are mostly Chinese men between 15 and 30 years old who post messages and virtual gifts, visible to everyone logged on to her chatroom. 

China’s live­streaming industry reached 425 million subscribers in 2018 out of a current total internet user base of more than 829 million, according to government statistics cited in Chinese state media. Live­stream hosting is an increasingly popular career choice, especially for young Chinese women like Nai Nai.
Nai Nai, a 23-year-old live-streamer from Shanghai, China, fights like lovers with her friend, the famous live-streamer Jiang Bo in Wuhan city. 

Nai Nai’s fans are mostly Chinese men between 15 and 30 years old who post messages and virtual gifts, visible to everyone logged on to her chatroom. 

China’s live­streaming industry reached 425 million subscribers in 2018 out of a current total internet user base of more than 829 million, according to government statistics cited in Chinese state media. Live­stream hosting is an increasingly popular career choice, especially for young Chinese women like Nai Nai.
Jiang Bo and Nai Nai fight like lovers.
Nai Nai (right), a 23-year-old live-streamer in Shanghai, China, joins other live-streamers at a military boot camp for a broadcasting program.
Looking out of the window from the block of Nai Nai.
Nai Nai, a 23-year-old live-streamer in Shanghai, China, learns Korean K-pop dance to improve her shows.

Photographer. Writer. Storyteller. Justin Jin captures a changing world through stories of real lives.

Justin is commissioned by global media, corporations and NGOs to craft visual and text narratives around the world. He uniquely combines image-making and long-form writing to tell stories for high-end magazines such as GEO. International prizes attest to his dedication.

Speaking five languages -- English, Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese, Russian, French and Dutch, Justin cuts through cultural barriers to the heart of diverse themes.

Born in Hong Kong, he studied philosophy and social science at Cambridge University. His started his career as a journalist at Reuters news agency in London and Beijing, and then embarked on an independent path, having lived in Moscow, Amsterdam and now Brussels.

Justin is Sony's global ambassador.

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