Lord of the Flies Release of Beast

Setting

on an uninhabited island in the Pacific Ocean, at an unknown—but probably 1950ish—year during a fictional atomic war. And what an island it is. We don't find out much about the scenery until the boys do, so we get the same thrill of exploration and satisfaction of discovery.

Characters

The First Character we met in the story. The elected leader of the boys and the main protagonist. He is neither the smartest nor the strongest but has a kind of quiet charisma and good looks.
The second character we met. He provides the brains of the group, as well as the spectacles necessary to start the fire.
The most complicated character described in the book, who completely changed during they are in the island. The leader of the choir/hunters. Already militant as a choir leader, Jack leads his group of choirboys-turned-hunters in mutiny against Ralph's leadership by playing on the boys' baser instincts.
The youngest children, which grouped as "littluns". They remain with Ralph during the mutiny.

Events

A lot of cruel and thriller thing happened here...

story Begins

In the midst of a nuclear war, a group of British boys find themselves stranded without adult supervision on a tropical island. The group is roughly divided into the "littluns," boys around the age of six, and the "biguns," who are between the ages of ten and twelve. Initially, the boys attempt to form a culture similar to the one they left behind. They elect a leader, Ralph, who, with the advice and support of Piggy (the intellectual of the group), strives to establish rules for housing and sanitation. Ralph also makes a signal fire the group's first priority, hoping that a passing ship will see the smoke signal and rescue them. A major challenge to Ralph's leadership is Jack, who also wants to lead. Jack commands a group of choirboys-turned-hunters who sacrifice the duty of tending the fire so that they can participate in the hunts. Jack draws the other boys slowly away from Ralph's influence because of their natural attraction to and inclination toward the adventurous hunting activities symbolizing violence and evil.

Conflict Appeared

The conflict between Jack and Ralph — and the forces of savagery and civilization that they represent — is exacerbated by the boys' literal fear of a mythical beast roaming the island. One night, an aerial battle occurs above the island, and a casualty of the battle floats down with his opened parachute, ultimately coming to rest on the mountaintop. Breezes occasionally inflate the parachute, making the body appear to sit up and then sink forward again. This sight panics the boys as they mistake the dead body for the beast they fear. In a reaction to this panic, Jack forms a splinter group that is eventually joined by all but a few of the boys. The boys who join Jack are enticed by the protection Jack's ferocity seems to provide, as well as by the prospect of playing the role of savages: putting on camouflaging face paint, hunting, and performing ritualistic tribal dances. Eventually, Jack's group actually slaughters a sow and, as an offering to the beast, puts the sow's head on a stick.

Dangerous Atmosphere

Of all the boys, only the mystic Simon has the courage to discover the true identity of the beast sighted on the mountain. After witnessing the death of the sow and the gift made of her head to the beast, Simon begins to hallucinate, and the staked sow's head becomes the Lord of the Flies, imparting to Simon what he has already suspected: The beast is not an animal on the loose but is hidden in each boy's psyche. Weakened by his horrific vision, Simon loses consciousness. Recovering later that evening, he struggles to the mountaintop and finds that the beast is only a dead pilot/soldier. Attempting to bring the news to the other boys, he stumbles into the tribal frenzy of their dance. Perceiving him as the beast, the boys beat him to death.

Tragedy

Soon only three of the older boys, including Piggy, are still in Ralph's camp. Jack's group steals Piggy's glasses to start its cooking fires, leaving Ralph unable to maintain his signal fire. When Ralph and his small group approach Jack's tribe to request the return of the glasses, one of Jack's hunters releases a huge boulder on Piggy, killing him. The tribe captures the other two biguns prisoners, leaving Ralph on his own.

Humanity Decay

The tribe undertakes a manhunt to track down and kill Ralph, and they start a fire to smoke him out of one of his hiding places, creating an island-wide forest fire. A passing ship sees the smoke from the fire, and a British naval officer arrives on the beach just in time to save Ralph from certain death at the hands of the schoolboys turned savages.

Theme

Civilization versus Savagery

If some adult has ever snapped at you to be "civilized," then you probably know that "civilized" ends up referring to all kinds of arbitrary things: get your elbows off the table; say "please" and "thank you"; don't chew with your mouth open; don't flick spitballs at your sister. You know. Being "civilized" usually means not doing what comes naturally. At least, that's how Lord of the Flies seems to see it. What comes naturally is running around slaughtering pigs in war paint; and what's civilized is having names, addresses, meetings, and elected leaders. But those arbitrary markings of civilization might be the only things that make life worth living.

Loss of Innocence

The boys of Lord of the Flies are stranded on the island at just the right age (between six and twelve, roughly) to drop the idealism of youth and face the real world. How convenient. And what better place to do so than an uninhabited island free of rules, restrictions, and adults? Their real world is less the soul-killing drudgery of a 9-5 job, property taxes, and a baby who won't sleep through the night than the savagery of untamed human nature—but it's a loss of innocence all the same, when we (and the kids) realize that there's nothing innocent about childhood, after all. The novel ends with its main character, Ralph, weeping for "the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart."

Symbols

Conch, Ralph and Piggy discover the conch shell on the beach at the start of the novel and use it to summon the boys together after the crash separates them. Used in this capacity, the conch shell becomes a powerful symbol of civilization and order in the novel. The shell effectively governs the boys’ meetings, for the boy who holds the shell holds the right to speak.
Piggy's Glasses, Piggy is the most intelligent, rational boy in the group, and his glasses represent the power of science and intellectual endeavor in society. This symbolic significance is clear from the start of the novel, when the boys use the lenses from Piggy’s glasses to focus the sunlight and start a fire. When Jack’s hunters raid Ralph’s camp and steal the glasses, the savages effectively take the power to make fire, leaving Ralph’s group helpless.
Beast, The imaginary beast that frightens all the boys stands for the primal instinct of savagery that exists within all human beings. The boys are afraid of the beast, but only Simon reaches the realization that they fear the beast because it exists within each of them. As the boys grow more savage, their belief in the beast grows stronger. By the end of the novel, the boys are leaving it sacrifices and treating it as a totemic god. The boys’ behavior is what brings the beast into existence, so the more savagely the boys act, the more real the beast seems to become.

Credits:

Created with images by jumpinjimmyjava - "Lord of the Flies ( revisited )" • D-Stanley - "Admiralty Islands" • werner22brigitte - "soldier spear war" • 40799 - "fabric texture the substance" Littluns <https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5542456ce4b024b3a75503a1/554b9f11e4b05d8d6a64b101/554b9f1ee4b05d8d6a64b16e/1431019295549/littluns.jpg> Ralph <http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5veza9gBJ58/VvQlKLcc40I/AAAAAAAAAiA/Ol2N0VbRQI4vugb5L6szya9crA2VVjbWQ/s1600/tumblr_mrcl2tkOb41spdj1mo4_1280.jpg> Piggy <https://www.denvercenter.org/images/default-source/Series-images/lordoftheflies/lord-of-the-flies.png?sfvrsn=0> Jack <http://static1.squarespace.com/static/5542456ce4b024b3a75503a1/554b9f11e4b05d8d6a64b101/554b9f1fe4b00110a3e6a7b7/1431019295372/jack.jpg?format=750w> Conch <https://userscontent2.emaze.com/images/79a766fe-f383-408c-9461-480308a7483c/9a5a584453b6b0d4cc9bbcdc03e1d758.jpg> Glasses <http://wholesaleuk.org/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/g/j/gj416.jpg>

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