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Closed ecosystem terrariums bring spring inside Kristina Chaney '23

Inside a jar, a tiny world of moss flourishes. The water from the moss evaporates, condenses on the glass sides, and "rains" back down into the moss. The tiny world supports itself forever. Closed ecosystem terrariums are miniature ecosystems of moss kept indefinitely within glass containers. Once created, they do not have to be watered or cared for at all. These small worlds are a simple craft that can liven up a room without the pressure of watering a plant.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Find a glass container to put the terrarium in. You can use any kind of jar or bottle, as long as it can be closed.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Collect some small rocks and put them at the bottom of the jar.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Use scissors to cut a piece of wire mesh (or burlap) to cover the rocks. Measure with the bottom of the jar. Put it in the jar and smooth it as flat as possible.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23
Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Add a small amount of activated charcoal to the jar.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23
Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Add a layer of potting soil to the jar.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Go for a hike or to a forest to find moss.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Dig up small patches of it and put them in the jar.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23
Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

You can add small toys such as fake animals or plants if you want.

Photo by Kristina Chaney '23

Finally, close the jar. As long as you keep the terrarium out of direct sunlight, you will be able to leave it indefinitely without any need for water or cleaning.

Credits:

All photos by Kristina Chaney '23