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“Here He Comes!” photography by denver bryan

Used to be, a guy could fool old bulls with just a single-reed bugle call and corrugated tube. But there are more hunters in the woods these days, and the elk have heard it all. When they turn vocal in mid-September, less is usually more. A gentle cow or calf call and good positioning are more important than being able to belt out a three-octave ear-buster. Better to talk sweet, ’cause the big guy knows exactly where you are.
There comes a moment when you know the conversation has turned. Classic bugling subsides to guttural chuckles punctuated by antlers thrashing the spruce. Limbs breaking. A hoof falling. The barrel-chested breaths getting closer. This wapiti game has changed, with more people playing. But one thing remains the same: You still have to speak their language.

Denver Bryan captured the images of his nephew, Justin Bryan, while hunting elk on private land in Montana’s Bridger Mountains, where they were part of an elk camp whose hunters chased bulls for a long and tiring week during the peak of the rut.

Created By
Gray's Sporting journal MMN
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Credits:

photography by Denver Bryan

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