Bourrée By: kaitlynn Jensen

The Bourrée or "french clog dance " was first introduced by Marguerit de Navarre in 1565. It originates in Auvergne, France. Bourrée was first mentioned as popular in 1665. It was also known as a ballet step, Pas de Bourrée; in which one foot crosses in front or behind the other, a basic ballet step. This step appears in the Nutcracker. The famous composer Bach wrote E minor for the flute, just for this dance. This dance uses 3/8 time music.

Bourrée is proformed by these snowflake fairies

The steps to Bourrée: First and formost this dance is led with the left foot, and you move with your shoulders. The dance can be done with a partner or solo.

Start with your feet together, then step forward with left foot, bring right foot forward and quickly step; right-left-right, then you step back and repeat 4 times. After the fourth time you step forward turn sideways;right-left-right and spin to face opposite direction and repeat 4 times. You continue to do this as long as your music goes, but it is optional.

this link shows how to do the dance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDCbfE0p3_Q

what the women would wear
what the men would traditionally wear

Resources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourr%C3%A9e

https://www.reference.com/beauty-fashion/traditional-dress-france-e74c2a1bb48a1b56

https://www.britannica.com/art/bourree

Created By
Kaitlynn Jensen
Appreciate

Credits:

Created with images by MichelV - "french flag france flag" • Larry1732 - "The Nutcracker" • wisegie - "French flag"

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