YISHUN Is it that bad?

OPENING

We often see Yishun as the urban neighbourhood where anything horrible can happen. What happens when we explore the nature side of this bad-mouthed town of Singapore?

PHOTO ESSAY

Among all the different towns in Singapore, Yishun stands out. There's no evidence that Yishun is the only town with crimes and mysterious occurrences, so is Yishun like a rock that is being nitpicked on, despite being similar to the rest?
Here at Lower Seletar Reservoir, a Buoy sits standing at bay (quite literally), with no lifeguard in sight. There are no patrolling officers, and if someone were to be at risk of drowning in the water, no one could save them, in this lonely, rarely visited part of Yishun.
Many have wondered: "What is wrong with Yishun?". Unlike this fenced-up kayak storage hut, Yishun has been open about what goes on in the town. Lhu Wen Kai of The Yishun Dream and JianHao Tan have both done uninterrupted research on Yishun, with the latter even visiting the town to try to witness anything out of the ordinary. The key that 'unlocked' the bad press in Yishun can be said to be that of STOMP, where citizens brought up the happenings in the town.
Like an old tree, Yishun has most of its 'happenings' in Yishun Ring Road, which was cited in 'The Yishun Dream'. After being brought down by bad press and negative media portrayals, many have been too scared to visit Yishun, with many 'Yishunites' (residents of Yishun) defending their beautiful town of much history. Did the media bark up the wrong tree? Is Yishun just like any other town?
Many Singaporeans have found themselves lost in the sea of bad press, wondering if Yishun is indeed that bad. The teachings of the Singaporean media anchors us down in the belief that Singapore has low crime rates, and Yishun seems to have an excessive amount of crime. Is this just due to the over-exposure of events in Yishun? Or is it something that is true to the town? Shrouded in bad press, all residents of Yishun are on the same boat, unable to figure out what to do.

A photo essay by Maximilian Oh of Yishun Junior College.

Created By
Max Oh
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