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By Air, Land and Sea Delivering health supplies to Haiti's last mile ​

In Haiti, the journey to deliver health commodities to the last mile is no easy task.

As of 2011, Haiti had approximately 1,700 kilometers of paved roads, more than 2,600 kilometers of unpaved roads, and bridges that were not passable or in disrepair. Because many of the roads are unmapped and unmarked, local knowledge is critical to traversing the country.

The USAID Global Health Supply Chain Program-Procurement and Supply Management (GHSC-PSM) project procures and distributes HIV/AIDS and family planning commodities to health clinics across Haiti. Because of the challenging terrain, ensuring all patients have access to the medicines they need requires ingenuity and novel approaches.

By air.

When civil unrest blocked roads and disrupted ground transportation, GHSC-PSM contracted inter-regional aircraft to deliver ARVs to remote health centers and hospitals so patients could continue to access treatment.

By motorized vehicle. ​ ​

Often, the project uses its own vehicles or the services of a third party logistics provider to reach service delivery points.

By donkey.

In remote areas such as Duty in the Nord-Ouest province, donkeys or mules make deliveries possible when roads are no longer passable.

By boat. ​

GHSC-PSM delivers commodities to several islands that can only be reached by boat, such as Ile de la Tortue (Turtle Island).

By motorcycle.

Once deliveries arrive on shore, they are then taken by motorcycle to clinics and hospitals. Motorcycles are the only means of motorized transport on the island.

Since 2016, GHSC-PSM has delivered more than 1,695 tons of HIV/AIDS and family planning and reproductive health commodities to patients across Haiti.

“Being stocked out would be catastrophic for the lives of patients, most of whom travel miles to get treatment here. We were worried that we would not be able to receive the medicines on time. In spite of all, you came here. You helped prevent a stockout in the site. The action is admirable. Sacrifice to save people's lives is priceless. All we can say is thanks a lot for all this dedication.” - Dieuseul Bien-Aimé, Stock Manager, ​ Pignon Espérance Hospital

For more information, please go to:

Credits:

GHSC-PSM/Rodny Darenard

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