History of bridges

Bridges first begun being built in ancient times when the first civilizations started rising in the Mesopotamian. They could not span a long way because mortar was not yet invented because dirt fillings would wash away by rain.

In the nineteenth century, bridge building became a strong focus after a backlash brought about by disasters in which bridges failed to endure predictable loads. Disasters that could have just been a dense crowd of people that could be up to 140 pounds per square foot.

One of the first big project was the Cincinnati bridge that called for a 1057 foot long suspension bridge over the Ohio river. And the man who was constructing that project was Washington.

Caissons were a very important part of the bridge. Which they were made from wood and iron from the shipyard on the east river, then sealed to be waterproof, were then launched down a ramp into a river just like a ship.

From the bridges in Rome, to the Brooklyn bridge, many things have changed the way that bridges are built and the leaders that have constructed them since then.

Credits:

Created with images by Smabs Sputzer - "Very Old Postcard" • Patrick Feller - "Pony Girder Railroad Bridge over Cedar Bayou, Baytown, Texas 1309281515BW" • Seattle Municipal Archives - "Crowd on half-built Fremont Bridge, circa 1916" • Wildernessman - "john a roebling bridge cincinnati bridge cityscape" • MSVG - "Humber Bay Arch Bridge" • Jauher Ali Nasir - "Brooklyn Bridge"

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.