Cameras and Collective Learning Created By: Elizabeth freiburger

At the very of the photo grid below you will see a black and white photo of a big contraption with some men in the back round it. Well that thing would be the first camera ever. It was made back in 1685 by Johann Zahn. He wasn't able to take an actual picture with it but that is what Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826/1827 did. He took a picture of what people think is a window. (The picture is at the very bottom right corner).

These bottom two pictures are of the first camera ever, created by using a light from the camera lens which then takes the image and holds it on film. The lenses can be any shape or size for the picture. Then the film is developed in a dark room where they are printed on to paper. And then the first photo ever which was taken by using heliography. Heliography is basically copying things and using the copy to make a picture. Joseph Nicéphore was the one to create heliography and he tried many times before he was able to get a picture without it fading away.
The one on the left is Joseph Nicephore Niepce, the man to take the first photo and the one on the right is Johann Zahn, the man to make the first camera.

Cameras are important for the global society for many different reasons. One reason is that without them news wouldn't be shared the same way and not as fast. Cameras are also helpful because they can capture an image in time that you could then look upon again years later. That is helpful because then we can see pictures of how things were, which helps us understand the history that goes with it. Lastly, cameras are helpful for the global society because they help to spread collective learning. Cameras help spread news and deliver a different type of information that can then be shared with other people and used for learning purposes.

Collective Learning

This video will help explain what collective learning is and how it happens.

Looking at the big history site, you can see that there are many different thresholds that helped make the society that we have today. These thresholds are important because by looking at them you can see what happened and what went wrong or right, so that things are the way they are today.

Increasing complexity-

Increasing complexity is when things start to grow and expand, for example humans. Billions of years ago we had started out as just a little, single celled organism. Now we have become so complex as humans. We have increased our complexity, by using collective learning.

These are some Thresholds that can connect with the invention of the camera/photograph.

Threshold 1 connects to the camera because, the camera needed certain things to happen/go right so that it could be made and be able to take a photo. Threshold one talks about the Goldilocks conditions and how they had played a huge role in the making of the universe, this in a way applies to the camera. The camera needed certain things to be able to operate. First off, the camera needed certain materials, at the right amounts and the camera also needed a certain lighting to be able to take a photograph. This is an example of the Goldilocks conditions because if the powder used to make the photo was never thought of for this process then the first photo might not have come until later or be different. Also, if the right amount of materials have not been planned out then things could have changed so that nothing showed up or that the image came out better, but who knows?

Threshold 2 also talks about the Goldilocks conditions and how they effected the way that our world came out. Threshold 2, also talks about a certain outcome that happened that lead to new things being created. This relates to the first photograph because when the first photograph happened/was taken it must have made people go nuts. When anything new and useful is invented it gets very famous and people try to find a way to make it better. So, when the first photograph was taken more people had tried to make new ways to take a photograph and make new cameras. Which had led to cameras getting smaller, travel size, pictures in color and so on. This all connects back to collective learning because without the first photograph people might not have pushed as hard to find a new way to use a camera and new ways to take photographs. They did this by looking and learning about the person before them had done the process and then thinking of new ways to shorten it or simplify it.

Threshold 3 an be connected with the camera and with the Goldilocks conditions because they are kind of talking about the same things. In Threshold 3 it discusses how new chemicals were made and how those chemicals then helped complexity further expand by having chemistry being born. When the giant start mentioned in Threshold 3 collapsed, it made new chemicals, which then helped make the powder, bitumen which was used to take the first photo. Then over time bitumen had been used for different things, for example, some people know it as asphalt. Asphalt can be used to repair things like roads or roofs. This also applies to Threshold 5 because in Threshold 5, the Goldilocks conditions occur which then lead to new things being made and new things put into motion that then start things up for the future.

Threshold 6 is about Collective learning. This ties in very well with the camera because, the camera is part of Collective learning. The camera made things so that when you take a picture you can analyze the photograph and you can tell what is going on at that time. With the photograph you can see more into the history that you are trying to learn about, you can see a visual of how the person or place was at the time being in the photo. In Threshold 6 it explains how collective learning also needs the Goldilocks conditions, and how that because of the Goldilocks conditions we are able to be as connected as we are in the many ways we are.

The impact of cameras to different cultures/societies-

The camera has been used for many different things, such as, photography, movies, they are used to document things, cameras are used in fashion and in portraits, etc. Cameras are pretty useful objects yet sometimes they have negative affects on different people. For example, there are cameras in phones, so this will sort of be about phones as well. Anyway, their impacts have not been small ones, once you take a picture almost on any device even if it is an actual camera there is still a way for you to immediately share it to the world. One a photo is into the internet it is forever there. It can't be erased or deleted because lots of people have already seem it and may have passed it on. So, lets say you're a younger kid of maybe 11-13 ish and you have this one picture of your friend and let's just say she is wearing a look all of her own. Now what happens, it the kid that you are thinks it is funny to post things like that on the internet. Then what happens, now the picture of your friend is in the abyss for everyone to see. This is one of the negative affects because with being able to share things as fast as we can it can affect the way people think. For example, some people think that it is okay to say really rude things o stranger they most likely haven't even met. A positive way that cameras have affected is that cameras/pictures can sometimes make a person more informed about what they are learning, which is a good thing that they are learning more.

These are just some photos that illustrate the negative ways the camera has affected us.

Work Cited-

  • https://petapixel.com/2015/05/23/20-first-photos-from-the-history-of-photography/
  • http://www.whoinvented.org/who-invented-camera/
  • http://www.innovateus.net/invention/camera
  • http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/exhibitions/permanent/firstphotograph/process/#top
  • http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/exhibitions/permanent/firstphotograph/
  • http://www.shawacademy.com/blog/top-15-genres-of-photography-that-you-need-to-know/
  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jim-luce/the-impact-of-cell-phones_b_508011.html
  • https://www.reference.com/technology/camera-changed-lives-2d80004d08de0fe
  • http://www.whoinvented.org/who-invented-camera/
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_camera
  • https://www.reference.com/technology/cameras-changed-over-years-2352309d186ea068
  • http://www.engineersgarage.com/invention-stories/camera-history
  • http://photodoto.com/camera-history-timeline/
  • http://www.photopedagogy.com/threshold-concepts.html
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppIzSaP2jWI
  • https://school.bighistoryproject.com/pages/console/
  • I had also used Google and Google Images

Credits:

Created with images by Alexas_Fotos - "frog photographer soap bubble" • kaboompics - "canon camera analog" • 955169 - "camera old new" • rpavich - "My new baby...the X-T1."

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