Dada(ism) Jaime Diaz de Rivera, 8I, CN:12

🔑 Facts

  • Started 1916, ended 1924
  • A conceptual art not focusing on aesthetically-pleasing artworks, but rather, focusing on propaganda that opposed bourgeois cultures.
  • Dadaists used to have a rendezvous place called the "Cabaret Voltaire" in Zurich, and they also had protests against bourgeois culture.
  • They were known to use ready-made objects: objects that can be presented as art with little manipulation by the artist.
Examples of Dadaism

Neo-Dadaism

🗝 Facts

  • Started 1952, ended 1970
  • This time, they provoked through covert strategies which are more suitable during the Cold War
  • Neo-Dadaists simultaneously mocked and celebrated consumer culture, united opposing conventions of abstraction and realism, etc.
  • They encouraged viewers to look beyond traditional aesthetic standards, and interpret meaning through a process of critical thinking generated by contradictions, absurd juxtapositions, coded narratives, and other mixed signals.
Examples of Neo-Dadaism

Sources

  • Neo-Dada Movement, Artists and Major Works. (n.d.). Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://www.theartstory.org/movement-neo-dada.htm
  • Dada Movement, Artists and Major Works. (n.d.). Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://www.theartstory.org/movement-dada.htm

Credits:

Sources: Dada Movement, Artists and Major Works. (n.d.). Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://www.theartstory.org/movement-dada.htm Neo-Dada Movement, Artists and Major Works. (n.d.). Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://www.theartstory.org/movement-neo-dada.htm

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